Concurrent Sessions

The AHEAD 2008 Conference offers a number of informative concurrent sessions arranged in Topical Tracks.
While you may choose any session that you’d like, we offer these themes for those who want to explore particular topics in depth. Words in italics after each description indicate the topical tracks and areas.

Pre-selection of sessions you will attend is required. Please review the following session information below or online, choose the one session during each block that you will attend, and indicate those choices on your Conference Registration Form.

- Concurrent Block One
- Concurrent Block Two
- Concurrent Block Three
- Concurrent Block Four
- Concurrent Block Five
- Concurrent Block Six
- Concurrent Block Seven
- Concurrent Block Eight
- Concurrent Block Nine


Concurrent Block One

Wednesday, July 16th 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

#1.1 Alternate Math: Strategies for Accessible Math for the Web and Alternate Formats
Sean Keegan, California Community Colleges, HTCTU

MathType and Scientific Notebook are just two applications that can be used to create MathML-based Web pages as well as support the transformation to alternate formats, such as Nemeth Braille. Hands-on activities will be conducted to inform participants how to format and process math content into formats usable by students with disabilities.
Audience:All
disability and technology

#1.2 Tools and Strategies to Adapt to Changes in Support During Overseas Study
Olivia Emilia, National Clearinghouse Disability and Exchange, MIUSA
Rebecca Ritter, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Ross E. Colgate, SIT Study Abroad

An increasing number of students with disabilities are participating in overseas programs, and while abroad, these students may encounter changes in how disability is viewed and accommodated. This session presents tools students can use to prepare for study abroad experiences, and discusses strategies professionals can use for advising both students going abroad and colleagues in the overseas study office.
Audience: All
disability and the academic curriculum

#1.3 Disability within Diversity: The Challenges and Opportunities of an Intersectional Approach
Ruth Warick, University of British Columbia
Janet Mee, University of British Columbia

The formation of Access and Diversity at UBC in 2003 marked the creation of a unique model in student affairs in Canada. Disability services was combined with other social justice units which involved a paradigm shift to an intersectional approach which recognizes that disability intersects with race and ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientations. The implications of this approach will be discussed.
Audience: Intermediate
disability and diversity

#1.4 Success or Access: Why Am I Making These Accommodations?
Jane Jarrow, Disability Access Information and Support

These days, service providers seem more focused on legal compliance than functional limitations when it comes to assigning accommodations. In doing so, we may be creating our own problems in decision-making, justification, and usefulness of the accommodation. It’s time to go back to basics and examine WHAT the accommodation is, WHY we are making it, and WHO should get it!
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disability service centers

#1.5 Taking it to the Next Level: Universal Design in Graduate School
Nina Ghiselli, Alliant International University
Heather Wilson, Alliant International University
Celia Lopez, Alliant International University
Kirk Ditterich, graduate student

As students with disabilities acquire higher levels of education, graduate programs need to address their needs. Traditional modes of study have excluded students with disabilities by their very design. This program will discuss ways to implement universal design to address the barriers
encountered in graduate schools and programs focused on professional training.
Audience: Intermediate
disability and graduate/professional programs

#1.6 In and Out: Transitions for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut School of Law
Lorraine Wolf, Boston University
Ruth Bork, Northeastern University

Transition for this population is a very difficult task since routine and rituals are strong and significant. Our session will discuss both the transition into higher ed and some useful models and the transition out to the world of work, and models. We will present specific cases, how the transition was handled and how it can be improved.
Audience: All
higher education and transition

#1.7 Winning with People: Effective Strategies for Supporting Student-Athletes with Disabilities
Kimberly Doran, The Ohio State University
Caitlyn McCandless, The Ohio State University

This presentation will demonstrate how collaboration between the Office for Disability Services and Student-Athlete Support Services has created a system that helps student-athletes who have been diagnosed with a disability become successful in the classroom. You will leave with an understanding of how experience-proven methods have been effective in working with the diverse population at The Ohio State University.
Audience: All
disability and the co-curriculum

#1.8 Intersect Affirmation and Commitment to Achieve Access for Student Veterans with Disabilities
Cheryl Branker, North Carolina State University
Moses Gloria, US Department of Veterans Affairs

Many veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts are returning to institutions of higher learning as students with physical and/or mental impairments. This presentation will explain how the Disability Services Office at NC State University and its regional Department of Veterans Affairs affirmed and expressed their unified commitment to a new generation of student veterans.
Audience: All
disability and external forces

#1.9 Fostering a Collaborative Relationship with Legal Counsel: Benefits and Strategies
Angela Stowe, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
Allison Solomon, The University of Alabama at Birmingham

Let’s face it, Disability Services offices exist to ensure that institutions are complying with the law. As a result, our jobs frequently intersect with issues that require legal expertise. While we may be thoroughly trained in the ADA and Section 504, having a strong collaborative relationship with legal counsel can provide much-needed support, credibility, leverage, and legal expertise. This presentation will discuss strategies and provide examples of how a strong relationship with legal counsel can enhance your program.
Audience: All
the disability service professional and legal issues

#1.10 Disability and Spirituality: A Complex Intersection
Melanie Gangle, University of Portland
Kathy McGillivray, Bethel University

While disability services providers are primarily concerned with the academic and student development aspects of college life, it is critical to understand that many students have a faith tradition which may affect their experience of disability in a variety of ways. In this thought-provoking session, the presenters will facilitate a panel discussion that explores the intersection between the individual and
group experience of disability, and faith/spirituality. Panelists will represent a variety of faith traditions.
Audience: All
disability and external forces

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Concurrent Block Two

Wednesday July 16th 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

#2.1 Selecting Software for Students with Learning Disabilities: An Online Educational Resource
Jayme Johnson, California Community Colleges, HTCTU

Selecting appropriate educational software for students with learning disabilities can often be a difficult and complicated process. This online resource helps faculty identify appropriate and effective educational software to deal with specific cognitive deficits as identified through the common learning disability testing instruments. Learn how this resource came to be created, and how you can use it.
Audience: All
disability and technology

#2.2 Diversity in Action: Applications of Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education
Mari Guillermo, San Diego State University
Bobbie J. Atkins, San Diego State University

Institutions must be equipped to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse student population, including students with disabilities. This presentation will highlight innovations at higher education institutions that embrace diversity through the active application of universal design for learning principles. The collaborative nature of an Asset-Oriented model along with the capitalization on individual expertise will also be presented.
Audience: All
disability and the academic curriculum

#2.3 An Introductory Discussion of Disability in Diverse Cultures
Carlie Andrews, Capella University

Cultural competence. Have you got it? In an ever diversifying world,
disability service providers must offer their services in ways that meet the needs of their students in culturally competent ways. This session will talk about how various cultures view disability and will provide a chance to discuss some of the challenges encountered when serving a diverse student body.
Audience: Intermediate
disability and diversity

#2.4 The Dual Role of the Disability Service Provider: Access for Students with Psychiatric Disabilities, Part I
Aaron Cohen, University of California, Berkeley
Barb Blacklock, University of Minnesota

This interactive session is Part I of a two-part session. The presenter will provide an overview of best practices in determining disability and facilitating reasonable accommodations for students with psychiatric disabilities. The presenter will use case scenarios to provide an opportunity for the participants to apply the concepts.
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disability service centers

#2.5 Conversations about Graduate School and Learning Disability: An Inclusive Research Model
Jacqueline Leber, Teachers College, Columbia University
Susan Baglieri, Long Island University-Brooklyn

Conversations about Learning Disabilities and Graduate School center on the self-told stories of graduate students who identify as LD, and culminates in a website that highlights the issues and concerns that our participants felt were important to tell. Our research design included a mentored relationship and partnership between LD and non-LD researchers to forefront a value for collaboration among many stakeholders in learning disability research.
Audience: All
disability and graduate/professional programs

#2.6 Community Colleges: Connecting Students to Careers?
Curtis Richards, Institute for Educational Leadership

Community colleges work with employers to ensure that programs and curricula are serving the needs of the local economy and they provide career services to its students. This panel will discuss a recent study of how those services are connected together or not and how the disability student services offices can connect, leading to jobs for students with disabilities.
Audience: Intermediate
higher education and transition

#2.7 It’s Greek To Me!: The Unofficial Guide to Fraternities and Sororities
Marcus Engel, Missouri State University (alum)

When you think of the Greek system, what comes to mind? Beer? Money? Popularity? Fraternities and sororities have long been known as an integral, yet exclusive, part of campus society. Where does this aspect of college co-curriculum fit regarding the DS office? Marcus Engel explores all aspects of Greek life, especially as it relates to persons with disabilities.
Audience: All
disability and the co-curriculum

#2.8 Departmental Accessibility Resource Coordinators (DARCs): A Network Approach to Changing Campus Climate
Aura Hirschman, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Roger O. Smith, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

This workshop explores organizational change theory and practice targeting a piloted strategy to infuse universal design for the educational benefit of all students with disabilities. The establishment of a campus wide departmental network of Departmental Accessibility Resource Coordinators (DARCs), along with ideas for training and dissemination activities, will be presented by representatives from college campuses which have successfully utilized this method.
Audience: All
disability and the policy environment

#2.9 Students with Disabilities in Postsecondary Education: Barriers to Success and Implications for Professionals
Adrianne Johnson, Mount Mary College

Speaker discusses the culture of the disabled college student regarding attitudinal, physical, and support barriers encountered in the postsecondary educational environment. Presentation addresses how a) physical barriers, b) use of student services, c) faculty attitudes, and d) peer attitudes impact postsecondary psychosocial adjustment and influence academic achievement.
Audience: Intermediate
the disability service professional and legal issues

#2.10 Disability and Policy Making Process in India
Gajendra Karna, Jawaharlal Nehru University

This presentation makes a modest effort to critically examine the policy-making and implementation processes in thedisability sector in India, and assess the involvement and participation of the disabled with certain discernible trends. It also analyses the ramifications of the global disability rights movement on development of plans and schemes for the disabled since independence.
Audience: All
disability and external forces

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Concurrent Block Three

Wednesday July 16th 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

#3.1 Affordable Reading Systems
Gaeir Dietrich, California Community Colleges, HTCTU
Jayme Johnson, California Community Colleges, HTCTU

Growing numbers of students with print disabilities are requesting e-text and audio versions of instructional materials. While some e-text and audio format players come with big price tags, there is software available at low cost or even free of charge. Learn more about the features and usability of these inexpensive products and where you can find them.
Audience: All
disability and technology

#3.2 A Systems Approach to Altering One University Context: Productive Learning u Strategies (PLuS)
Christopher Murray, University of Oregon
Carol Wren, DePaul University
Judith Kolar, DePaul University

In this presentation we describe an innovative university training program which is designed to alter the context of one four-year university. The approach is guided by a systems change perspective and targets university faculty and staff as agents for institutional change. This presentation will bring together a panel of presenters who have participated in implementing training activities and is designed to support students with LD within the university context by improving faculty and staff understanding about students with LD. The project is a university-wide training effort that targets all faculty and staff within the institution and it has three primary components: 1. A train-the-trainer model for faculty, staff, and administrators from all departments and offices throughout the university; 2. The distribution of print, video and technological resources to faculty, staff and administrators; 3. A customized, individualized web-based support system for faculty who currently teach students with disabilities in their classrooms.
Audience: All
disability and the academic curriculum

#3.3 Developing, Maintaining and Repairing Campus Intersections.
Grady Landrum, Wichita State University
Julie Bunch, Ozark Technical Community College
Martha Lewis, Wichita State University
Kathy Stewart, Wichita State University

In our jobs we must intersect with people at all levels of our institutions to ensure students have the proper access to our programs. These relationships are often fragile and need constant attention. This panel will share their successes, failures, and lessons learned in their combined 45+ years of providing services. Time will be provided for Q&A in this fun informal
setting.
Audience: Novice
students with disabilities and disability service centers

#3.4 The Dual Role of the Disability Service Provider: Access for Students with Psychiatric Disabilities Part II
Barbara Blacklock, University of Minnesota

This interactive session will focus on using the concepts from Universal Design to improve campus access for students with psychiatric disabilities. Participants will have an opportunity to identify strategies to use on their campuses and to begin development of a campus workplan to proactively address student mental health on their campus.
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disability service centers

#3.5 Law Students with Disabilities: Getting In and Getting Through
Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut, School of Law
Abel Montez, Fordham School of Law
Ellen Swaim, Vermont Law School
Kim Dempsey, Law School Admissions Council

Students with disabilities interested in law school face barriers in accessing accommodations on qualifying exams and securing accommodations in classes and on exams. How do service providers mitigate the impact of the environment while maintaining the intergrity of a rigorous curriculum? A panel will discuss how this process unfolds at three different law schools, and the professional who determines exam accommodations on the LSAT will discuss these interesting and sometimes difficult issues.
Audience: All
disability and professional/graduate programs

#3.6 Job Search Strategies for a Smooth Transition from School to Work
Karen Downs, Rochester Institute of Technology
John Macko, Rochester Institute of Technology

Encouraging deaf and hard of hearing students to make a smooth transition from school to the work environment can be fraught with challenges ranging from conducting a successful job search to communicating effectively with hearing co-workers. This presentation identifies these challenges and provides strategies that can be used to give students the tools they need to find and maintain employment.
Audience: All
higher education and transition

#3.7 How to Plan a Fun, Hands-On Disability Awareness Program Where Students Really Learn!
Jennifer Conway, Central Piedmont Community College

“Walk a Mile in My Shoes” is a successful co-curricular program that annually teaches hundreds of students about disabilities. Workshop attendees will learn about this program and participate in some of the eye-opening hands-on activities. You’ll learn how to build and adapt this program to fit your college environment and leave with a CD of all the documents you need.
Audience: All
disability and the co-curriculum

#3.8 Stepping Out -- How a Small Disability Office Can Institute Organizational Change
Pam Schwartz, Albion College
Jane Boomer, Oberlin College
Virginia Demers, Ringling College of Art & Design

A panel of DSS practitioners will present a multi-step plan designed to guide participants in moving beyond the office in order to develop institutional support for expanding and improving disability services. The panel will present case studies, demonstrating their own experiences in stepping out on their campuses.
Audience: All
disability and the policy environment

#3.9 Complaint Investigation Challenges: Effective Strategies for the Disability Services Provider & the ADA Coordinator
Carole Dubritsky, University of Michigan
Sam Goodin, University of Michigan
Howard Kallem, George Mason University

The roles of the Disability Services Provider and ADA Coordinator differ when there is a dispute regarding accommodations or access. This panel will provide the essential components for internal reviews of student complaints, including strategies for establishing effective policies when the Disability Services Provider is the ADA Coordinator. Critical factors that OCR evaluates during an investigation will also be presented.
Audience: All
the disability service professional and legal issues

#3.10 Advocacy Included!: A Historical Analysis of the Intersection of Student Activism & Disability Services
Colleen Lewis, Columbia University
Christopher Rosa, City University of New York

This presentation will explore the relationship between social movements and inclusive higher education for students with disabilities. We will examine six grass-roots movements for students with disabilities and their impact on the postsecondary environment & the experiences of college students with disabilities in this setting.
Audience: All
disability and external forces

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Concurrent Block Four

Thursday July 17th 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

#4.1 Feature Focus: Comparing Kurzweil, TextHELP, WordQ+Word+WordWeb and WYNN- A Users Perspective!
Sherri Parkins, Seneca College of Applied Arts and Tech.
Kevin Reinhardt, Seneca College of Applied Arts and Tech

Access to written material is paramount in today’s world. Access is a multistep process that can be enhanced by Assistive Technologies. Students who struggle need accommodations provided by programs like Kurzweil, TextHELP, WYNN or the combination of Microsoft Word+WordQ+WordWeb. What ARE the differences between these programs? Investigate toolbars, examine features including scanning,
reading, bookmarking, comprehension, studying, notetaking, and writing supports.
Audience: Intermediate
disability and technology

#4.2 Container, Content, Capability’s Accessibility Considerations for Learning Management Systems
Sean Keegan, California Community Colleges, HTCTU

Addressing the accessibility facets of a Learning Management System (LMS) is an important step before implementing such a platform in order to support institutional needs, as well as access for students with disabilities. Separating an LMS platform into distinguishable components allows for differentiation between what is and what is not accessible within the online learning environment.
Audience: All
disability and the academic curriculum

#4.3. Making Room at the Intersection: An Open Forum on a Proposed Strategic Plan for Addressing Diversities in Disabilites
Vinson Ballard, Jackson State University
Ruth Warick, University of British Columbia
Mattie Grace, University of Southern California
Gerri Wolfe, University of Georgia

This roundtable session will offer participants an opportunity to share helpful, up to date information and resources, and interact with seasoned DS professionals relative to identifying and developing strategies for addressing the diversity of students with disabilites on our campuses. With the “multiple intersections” increasingly represented by those who utilize DS Offices, it is becoming ovelmingly evident that genuine efforts be ascertained.
Audience: All
disability and diversity

#4.4 Extending the Reach of a DS Office: Partnering to Create a Support Group for Students with Psychiatric Disabilities
Sara Hegge, University of Minnesota
Cynthia Fuller, University of Minnesota

Students with psychiatric disabilities encounter barriers to participation in student activities and services on campus. In response, Disability Services (DS) and University Counseling Center (UCS) collaborated on a support group focusing on participants’ multiple needs: managing a mental illness, building personal connections, and developing skills in student roles. The shared interests in and responsibilities for this student population has lead to richer services than either DS or UCS could offer individually. This presentation, will share the development of a collaborative model for service delivery.
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disability service centers

#4.5 Go to the Head of the Class: A Panel Discussion on the Challenges Facing Students with Disabilities in their Chosen Career of Teaching
Moderator: Carol DeSouza, University of Massachusetts, Boston
Panelists TBA

This experienced panel will discuss accommodations for student teaching and on licensure exams and consider strategies that support students as they transition from school into teaching careers. Students with disabilities moving into careers in education must answer the questions of when and how to disclose their disabilities to the supervising practitioner and university supervisor during their student teaching experiences and to their students, parents, principals, school evaluators, etc. in their first years of teaching. We will consider how student with disabilities can “match” their own learning and newly formed teaching styles with the learning styles of their pupils and present data on state licensure exams taken with accommodations.
Audience: All
disability and professional/graduate programs

#4.6 Community Collaborations + Demonstrated Supportive Program = Successful Postsecondary Transition: Learn and Earn
Michelle Campbell, Abilities, Inc.
Sean Cruse, Abilities, Inc.
Karine Pierre-Pierre, Hudson County Community College
Jacqueline Heads, Hudson County Community College

Presentation describes a unique transitional program offering counseling and logistical support for students with disabilities completing high school. In a collegiate setting, Learn and Earn provides educational and career guidance for students who potentially would not be encouraged to pursue post-secondary education. The mechanics of the program, measured outcomes, steps for replication and customization will be discussed by program administrators.
Audience: All
higher education and transition

#4.7 Supports Necessary for a Student on Autism Spectrum to Attend College Using C I P Model
Michael McManmon, College Internship Program

Presentation will outline the supports necessary for students on the autism spectrum to attend college including social, academic, vocational, environmental and emotional. A unique curriculum will be shared of comprehensive services such as Intensive Training Modules, College Liaison Assistance, Tutorials, Study Groups & Study Halls, Student Advising, Vocational Internships & Career Counseling, Individual & Group Therapies, Medication Coordination, Social Mentoring, Residential & Independent Living Supports and Recreational Activities.
Audience: All
disability and the co-curriculum

#4.8 Plot Your Path: Navigating Through the Intersection of Universal Design and Campus Culture
Terra Beethe, Bellevue University

This well-received offering from the Charlotte conference is back to discuss how Implementing Universal Design into a campus environment can be a daunting prospect. Session will provide practical examples of putting UD concepts into action, allow audience members to share individual experiences with UD, and discuss strategies that fit your institution. Presenter will share ways to assess progress toward your UD goals and will prove that it CAN be “all fun and games”!
Audience: Intermediate
disability and the policy environment

#4.9 When Disability Characteristics Intersect with Disciplinary Systems
Robert Harden, Central Washington University
Pamela Wilson, Central Washington University

Collisions aren’t unusual at the intersection of symptoms and systems. Separating disability from behavioral standards can be a difficult task. Experienced International presenters on disability issues explore this complex and increasingly important issue on college campuses. Participants will be provided with guidance based on OCR findings and the latest expert advice. Ample opportunity for discussion is included.
Audience: All
the disability service professional and legal issues

#4.10 The Long Road to Social Justice: The Intersection of Perception, Disability Policy and Change
Gladys Loewen, Assistive Technology-BC
Bill Pollard, MS, University of Massachusetts, Boston

National, state/province and local governmental policies and programs have both a direct and indirect influence on society due to the attitude and thinking of the policy makers. Some policies and programs are charity focused, based on social welfare ideology; others appear to focus on systemic changes that promote effective solutions based on social justice that advance access and effective participation. This session will take an historical look at the development, implementation and impact of social policy on the present day lives of disabled people. Through the exploration of policy and change, the attendee will be provided with the opportunity to assess current campus policies and their effect on services provided and the role of the service professional.
Audience: All
disability and external forces

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Concurrent Block Five

Thursday, July 17th 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

#5.1 Accessible Podcasting
Jayme Johnson, California Community Colleges, HTCTU

Podcasting has become a common way of distributing information. With this rise in popularity, the educational potential of the podcast medium is also being explored. Learn more about how podcasts are made, and how they can be enhanced for accessibility using free and inexpensive tools like iTunes, Quicktime Pro, and others.
Audience: All
disability and technology

#5.2 Junctions: Disability Services, a Learning Center, and Universal Design Working Together to Enhance Student Learning
Arlene Stewart, Clemson University
Elaine Richardson, Clemson University

This session will present ideas on integration of Disability Services activities with a general campus learning center and how to partner to develop the idea of Universal Design across campus. The session will also demonstrate a model for using undergraduate research to further the Universal Design concept.
Audience: All
disability and the academic curriculum

#5.3 Universities’ Role In Preparing Students for Disabilities In the Workplace
Barbara Keaton, Keaton Resources, Inc.
Toby Willis, City University

It is estimated that one in five employees either have a disability or will develop a disability during their employment career. While higher education is preparing students to perform work, it is not preparing students to enter an environment where they will most likely find themselves working with employees with disabilities. Small group interaction will give participants new ways to integrate disability awareness on their campuses.
Audience: All
disability and diversity

#5.4 Career Planning and Placement: Personal Development and Decision Making Skills for Students with Disabilities
Sheila Milan, Northern Illinois University

Students with disabilities are graduating from colleges and universities in great numbers. Legal statues and disability supportive services have provided a vehicle to address issues of accessibility and compliance which have afforded many students with disabilities a venue into higher education. Career Services and other disability employment networking organizations provide valuable resources to all students meeting career goals and yet, the numbers of students with disabilities who graduate do not match the numbers entering the work force. This proposal will share developmental strategies for career service programs, educators, and disability service providers on how to help students with disabilities transition beyond academia into the world of work.
Audience: All
higher education and transition

#5.5 A Profile of Disability Service Providers in Higher Education
Wendy S. Harbour, Harvard University

This session will present a summary of key findings from the 2008 AHEAD member survey. Major topics of the survey included personal and professional backgrounds of disability services professionals, salary and compensation for staff, and general information about similarities and differences of disability services offices across the country. Participants will also learn how the 2008 findings compare to results of previous surveys, as well.
Audience: All
disability services

#5.6 The Iowa Transition Initiative: Support for Accommodation Requests (SAR) Implementation
Carolyn Wassenaar, Consultant State of Iowa
Barb Guy, State of Iowa Department of Education

Transition for students with disabilities from secondary to post-secondary educational environments presents a myriad of challenges. A collaborative group of professionals from the State of Iowa will share current actions, insights, challenges, and opportunities as progress is made toward statewide implementation of the Support for Accommodation Request (SAR) form, a tool developed to address and ease transition challenges.
Audience: All
higher education and transition

#5.7 Beyond the Disability Services Office: Intersection with University and Community Services
Allison Solomon, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
Angela Stowe, The University of Alabama at Birmingham

This session will discuss the not-so-everyday issues that service providers face. We are expected to provide reasonable accommodations ensuring campus accessibility to programs and services; however, we often encounter issues that are beyond providing accommodations. This program will address those situations that call for us to connect with other university and community services.
Audience: All
disability and the co-curriculum

#5.8 Using Research to Inform Practice and Policy that Supports the Education of Students with Chronic Illness
Lynn Royster, DePaul University
Mary Gloria Njoku, DePaul University
Paula Kravitz, DePaul University

In order to facilitate policy modifications, educators and researchers in the field of postsecondary education of persons with chronic illness must ascertain the prevalence and needs of students with chronic illness. The panel will present the epidemiology and a needs assessment of students with chronic illness. They will also discuss ways to address the specific needs identified in this study.
Audience: All
disability and the policy environment

#5.9 AHEAD E-Text Solutions Forum
Ron Stewart, AHEAD
Jim Marks, University of Montana

Learn about current activities of the AHEAD E-Text Solutions Group and get up-to-date developments in the provision of educational materials in accessible formats.
Audience: All
disability services

#5.10 Hitch Your Wagon to a Star: Innovative Partnerships, Technologies and Ideas with the Power to Propel Us Forward
Melanie Thornton, University of Arkansas, Little Rock

The exploration of ways in which disability intersects with current social trends offers more than an academic challenge, it offers opportunities to harness the power of collaboration. Join us as we discuss powerful social trends and consider ways in which our profession might exploit the momentum of these trends to advance new views of disability, change attitudes, and transform environments.
Audience: All
disability and external forces

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Concurrent Block Six

Thursday, July 17th 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

#6.1 Paving the Road to DAISY
Ron Stewart, AHEAD

The DAISY standard is an open-source format for accessible digital audio books that can be played on both software and hardware DAISY players. We will show examples of players and demonstrate the ease with which a DAISY talking book can be navigated and used. We will discuss the flexibility of the DAISY format, along with its expandability to include math and, eventually, multimedia. We will walk through the process of creating a DAISY book, demonstrating markup and showing how to use the DAISY books you create. Then we will use the features in DAISY reader software that allow the user to jump to specific pages, add bookmarks, and search the text.
Audience: All
disability and technology

#6.2 MPLTL: Enhancing Student Academic Success in Gateway Math/Science Courses
David R. Parker, Washington University in St. Louis
Christine Duden Street, Washington University in St. Louis

Professionals with disabilities are underrepresented in math and science careers. Barriers in large, undergraduate “gateway” math and science courses substantially contribute to this problem. The presenters will summarize the results of a National Science Foundation pilot grant that adapted Peer Led Team Learning (PLTL) for students with LD/ADHD to better support collaboration with faculty to enhance student access.
Audience: All
Topical Track: disability and the academic curriculum

#6.3 Rethinking, Reframing and Redesigning Disability
Gladys Loewen, Assistive Technology British Columbia
Sue Kroeger, University of Arizona

Increasing numbers of disability professionals recognize the promise of universal design and the social model of disability. Many of us work to promote this concept within our institutions, yet at times we feel uncertain about how to initiate organizational change. In this workshop, we will explore avenues for moving our profession in more progressive directions that are informed by Disability Studies and current thinking about disability. Participants will move from theory to practice, considering strategies for realizing a vision of full participation of people with disabilities through the creation of usable, sustainable and inclusive learning environments.
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disability service centers

#6.4 Highlights of a Longitudinal Study of Adults with Learning Disabilities up to 20 Years after Exit from College
Susan Vogel, Northern Illinois University

The purpose of this session is to describe findings regarding educational, occupational, and financial attainments of 59 adults with LD as compared to those without disabilities up to 20 years after exit from college. We will share their insights regarding changes in the impact of LD across the lifespan, emotional and physical well-being, disclosure, accommodations, and compensatory strategies. Implications for intervention will be drawn.
Audience: All
higher education and transition

#6.5 Access to Clinical Experiences in Health Care Programs: Case Studies in Collaboration
Carol Sitterly, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Health care programs present unique challenges for students with disabilities in classroom and experiential settings, with access and quality of experience dependent on DSS partnerships with administrators, faculty and preceptors. Student narratives and case studies of clinical rotation and clerkship experiences that lead to access, success and collaboration will be presented and discussed.
Audience: All
disability and graduate/professional programs

#6.6 Enhancing the Transition to Higher Education through Peer Mentoring
Edith Miller, East Stroudsburg University of PA
Julianne Albiero-Walton, East Stroudsburg University
Program Mentors TBA

Faculty members from the DS Office and peer mentors will describe the program established to enhance the transition of first-year students with disabilities to higher education. The program matches upper class or graduate honor students with freshmen who have similar disabilities/majors/interests. The panel will discuss mentor selection, training, activities, responsibilities, and results of surveys completed by mentors and mentees.
Audience: Intermediate
higher education and transition

#6.7 A Student Measure of Campus Accessibility: The ACES Taxonomy
Roger O. Smith, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Aura Hirschman, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Margaret Kastner, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

The ACCESS-ed Project has been developing a new measurement tool to assist college campuses in becoming more inclusive by applying universal design in learning, information, service and physical environments. The ACES (Accessible Campus Environment Survey) Taxonomy elicits a student snapshot of a campus’ accessibility. The ACES data also proposes a method for longitudinal program evaluation from a student perspective on the college experience.
Audience: Intermediate
disability and the co-curriculum

#6.8 Connecting the Synergy of Emergency Preparation, Higher Education and Individuals with Disabilities
Vinson Ballard, Jackson State University
Ron Venable, University of North Texas
Dawn Stevenson, Ftichburg State University

Members of the newly formed Emergency Preparedness SIG will offer helpful resources and an interactive session relative to acquiring desirable synergy to address the awesome task of campus readiness. This will be discussed by individuals from the AHEAD membership as a follow up to the important first steps taken during the gathering at the Charlotte, North Carolina conference in 2007.
Audience: All
disability and the policy environment

#6.9 When Colleges Serve Students with Disabilities, Everyone Benefits
Paul Grossman, Hastings College of Law, US Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, San Francisco

This foundational session offers key concepts for DS professionals, such as equal access, essential program components, documentation and the accommodations process and how these principles make for a better campus for all faculty, staff, students and the greater community.
Audience: Novice to Intermediate
the disability service professional and legal issues

#6.10 From Jerry’s Kids to Beijing: The Intersection of Sports and Disability
Trey Duffy, CalPoly

The Special Olympics began in 1968. Forty years later, during the summer of 2008, a disabled athlete is barred from the Beijing Olympics (not Paralympics) because his prosthetic is considered an advantage. One of the few Supreme Court cases finding in favor of a disabled plaintiff was for a golfer. Murderball was an award-winning movie. What is the intersection between sports and disability? What can we learn from sports that is useful in our day-to-day work? You’d be surprised.
Audience: All
disability and external forces

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Concurrent Block Seven

Friday, July 18th 8:30 am – 10:30 am

#7.1 Authoring Accessible PDF Documents from Microsoft Word
Sean Keegan, California Community Colleges, HTCTU

Developing accessible PDF documents begins with adding the appropriate accessibility information during the document authoring process as well as choosing the correct applications to create the final document. This hands-on session will review the procedures necessary for creating accessible PDF files and include strategies for improving the accessibility of legacy PDF documents.
Audience: All
disability and technology

#7.2 CSSI: San Diego (College Student Success Initiatives at City College)
Debra Wright-Howard, San Diego City College
Barbara Mason, San Diego City College
Brian Stockert, San Diego City College

CSSI-San Diego: Join us for a lively presentation and discussion of our DNA (Disability Network Activities) year in San Diego where we worked to integrate core course faculty, DSPS faculty, the concept of student community and technology tools. We will share resources (fingerprints), pedagogy (footprints), and how the CSSI team efforts have been successful for students.
Audience: All
disability and the academic curriculum

#7.3 DISABLED Faculty and Staff: Perspectives From a Year Later
Moderator: Mary Lee Vance, University of Wisconsin, Superior
Panelists TBA

A year ago, AHEAD published a groundbreaking book containing contributions written by 33 disabled faculty and staff around the world representing diverse disabilities, racial backgrounds, sexual orientations and nationalities. In this session, 11 of the contributors discuss their book chapters, and what life has been like for them during the past year. Time will be provided for audience questions
Audience: All
disability and diversity

#7.4 Students with Asperger’s Syndrome: Supporting Social Development in Higher Education
Kendall Swanson, St. Edward’s University
Jan Serrantino, University of California, Irvine

Experts in the field of autism tell us two things about social development and students with Asperger’s Syndrome who are entering higher education: Their degree of academic success is often linked to their degree of social success, and close relationships with others can alter academic success and integration into the campus community. This presentation offers two universities’ perspectives on strategies for developing social thinking opportunities, as well as increasing support for students with Asperger’s Syndrome.
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disability service centers

#7.5 Intersection or Interference? The Forced Encounter Between Students and DS Offices
Molly Sirois, University of Oregon

DS professionals know better than anyone why students intersect with DS offices; because those students intersect with an educational environment that is not designed for them. What do we do with this knowledge? How might DS professionals use this knowledge to change institutional perceptions and practices? This session is for critical analysis of the student/DS intersection and for strategic planning to change the educational environment that forces that intersection.
Audience: All
disability and the policy environment

#7.6 Research and Program Symposium on Transition: Four Perspectives

National Picture of the Postsecondary Experiences of Students who had Received Special Education Services in High School Lynn Newman, SRI International

What happens to high school students with disabilities once they leave high school with its protective umbrella of IDEA and they enter postsecondary schools? This session provides a national picture of students’ postsecondary experiences - including enrollment rates, self-identification issues, accommodations and support received, courses of study, and completion rates - based on data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study - 2 (NLTS2).

Executive Function and the Transition to College
Ben Mitchell, Landmark College

Only 54% of college students finish their degree within six years: for LD students it’s as low as 40%. Data from a 2007 joint survey by Landmark College and AHEAD points to executive function as one of the central problems that derails bright and motivated college students with learning difficulties.

Examining College Student Attitudes Toward Requesting Accommodations
Lucy Barnard, Texas Tech University
William Lan, Texas Tech University
Deann Lechtenberger, Texas Tech University

In contrast to elementary and secondary education, students must request accommodations for their disabilities in higher education. We developed a survey to examine attitudes toward requesting accommodations of college students with disabilities at a large, public university located in the Southwest. Results indicate that those students requesting accommodations have significantly more positive attitudes toward requesting accommodations and better academic achievement.

A Semester-Long Approach to Transitioning: A Course for First-Year Students with Disabilities
Allison Tate, Baylor University
Dae Vasek, Baylor University

During the fall 2007 semester, Baylor University Office of Access and Learning Accommodation launched the B.E.A.R.S. Program (Building Excelling, Advocacy, and Resilience for Success), a one semester transition course for first-semester students with disabilities. This presentation will discuss the program, the first year outcomes, and will give attendees the chance to brainstorm ideas for transition programs at their own institutions.

Audience: All
higher education and transition

#7.7 Are you Prepared? Making Sure to Cover all Bases and Intersections
Emily Singer, The Catholic University of America
L. Irene Bowen, U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights
Virginia Reilly, Virginia Tech

We will address how to work with all areas of campus and local resources to be prepared for an emergency. It will help participants ensure that their institutions consider the needs of people with disabilities in all aspects of planning for and response to emergencies. A discussion of practical approaches will follow a brief overview of legal requirements.
Audience: All
disability and the policy environment

#7.8 Program Assessment: From Anecdote to Fact; Case Studies From the Trenches
Richard Riccardi, Southern Connecticut State University
Lynn Kohrn, Southern Connecticut State University
Steve Robillard, SR-PS

Assessment is no longer a buzz word, but an essential requirement for every practitioner. The question is no longer “Why Do I Need to Assess?” “What, When, Where and How Do I Assess?” As a panel, we will focus on the challenges and solutions of assessment, taking the “theories” of assessment and applying them in the real world.
Audience: Intermediate
disability and the policy environment

#7.9 Merging and Diverging Lanes: The US Legal Year in Review
Jo Anne Simon, Attorney at Law

Paul Grossman, Hastings College of Law, US Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, San Francisco
Every year seems to bring a new ride through the landscape of the US legal system. Join us as we examine developments in federal and state law that have an impact on disability and the higher education realm.
Audience: All
the disability service professional and legal issues

#7.10 Media Distortion of Disability and Its Adverse Effects
Sue Kroeger, University of Arizona
Bill Pollard, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Disability is everywhere in mass media including advertising, movies, TV, internet, print, and radio. Yet, the disability representations look and sound like something out of the early 1900s. More troubling is the effect that these images have on public policy, social services, education, and employment. This session will include an overview of the media, provide examples of disability images, explore the ways these images impact our thinking and actions both personally and professionally, and strategize ways we can influence the media to change.
Audience: All
disability and external forces

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Concurrent Block Eight

Friday, July 18th 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

#8.1 Creating Talking Tactile Graphics with IVEO
Gaeir Dietrich, De Anza College

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but sometimes the best way to convey information is with words *and* a picture! IVEO software paired with a touch tablet allows you to use text-to-speech (TTS) technology to create a tactile graphic that talks. In this session, we will talk about what makes a good tactile graphic and give you some ideas of how to create graphic templates that can be repurposed for multiple uses. You will see how to transform two-dimensional graphics into raised form and learn to use the IVEO tools to create zones and add auditory tags.
Audience: All
disability and technology

#8.2 Tying the Classroom to the Community Through the Use of Service Learning
Dipte Patel, El Camino College
Geralin Clark, El Camino College

Many students with disabilities struggle to understand academic concepts and how they relate to real life experiences. Service learning creates this intersection. It also increases student motivation, retention, goal setting, choosing a major, and understanding of workplace behaviors, requirements and accommodations. Explore this revitalizing learning tool which provides students with disabilities the joyful act of being of service.
Audience: All
disability and the academic curriculum

#8.3 Update and Implications of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities for Our Profession
Ruth Warick, University of British Columbia
Roxana Stupp, University of Illinois at Chicago

The adoption of a UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is a global milestone and the impacts will be felt on many college campuses around the world sooner than later. Panelists will share the background, key issues and current developments related to the Convention. Through this session, participants can fulfill one of the important components of their role, namely, to keep abreast of evolving developments, new thinking and new laws pertaining to disability.
Audience: All
disability and diversity

#8.4 The Role of the DS Provider: Assessing Potential for Student Violence to Self or Others
Aaron Cohen, University of California, Berkeley

DS providers are becoming more aware of the concerns on campus regarding student violence ot self or others. This session will assist DS Providers with understanding their role when working with students they are concerned may be potentially violent or suicidal. The presnter will provide tools to use when responding to these situations.
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disability service centers

#8.5 The Influence of Disability Services Information on Students’ College Choice
Wendy S. Harbour, Harvard University

This session presents results of a research study of college freshmen with disabilities from across the United States and their experiences with the transition from high school to college. Using data from an online survey (N=31) and in-depth interviews (N=8), research questions focused on three topics: how students learned about postsecondary disability services, when they learned the information, and how it affected their college choice process. Among other findings, the research suggests a highly individualized spectrum of transition planning for college-bound students with disabilities, and transition as a social and legal construct. Recommendations include applications of universal design in transition planning, at both the secondary and postsecondary levels, as well as strategies for communicating disability services information to prospective and current college freshmen.
Audience: All
higher education and transition research

#8.6 Transition from Post-secondary Education to the Labor Market: A Review of Current Research
Veronica Porter, Northeastern University
Larry Markle, Ball State University

The decline in the employment of individuals with disabilities since the passage of the ADA presents a serious concern since, according to research, during the same time period, employment rates for those without disabilities increased. This presentation will present the results of two research studies that were conducted relative to college graduates with disabilities and their labor market experience.
Audience: All
higher education and transition

#8.7 Yikes! My Campus is Changing to the Banner Student System!
Suelaine Matthews, St. Louis Community College-Florissant V
Linda Nissenbaum, St. Louis Community College at Meramec
Deborah Carter, St. Louis Community College-Forest Park
Jan Eudaley, St. Louis Community College at Wildwood

Many colleges/universities are changing to the Banner Unified Digital Campus System or a similar management system. DSS providers ask such questions as “How do you get information out of the system to effectively run your disability support services office?” “How do you get the information needed to help your administration understand your needs?” This session will describe how St. Louis Community College integrated disability information into the Banner System. The presenters will describe the step-by-step process in developing the system. Participants will learn how the Access Offices in a four-campus system are able to generate individualized Instructor Notification memos using Banner. Reports generated from the system and suggestions regarding duplication of the system on each participant’s campuses will be outlined.
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disability service centers

#8.8 Hogwarts Hypothetical: How Do Real Policies Intersect with the Wizarding World?
Elizabeth Worden, Eastern Maine Community College
Ann Ito, University of Hawai’i
Sam Goodin, University of Michigan
Jane Jarrow, Disabilty Access Information and Support
Howard Kallem, George Mason University

Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry has chosen to adopt the focus/intent of Muggle laws regarding access to education for witches and wizards with disabilities. To implement this change they have hired two consultants from the United States for whom they have questions that would resonate with programs that serve Muggles but which occasionally have properties that are unique to Hogwarts.
Audience: All
disability and the policy environment

#8.9 Postsecondary Opportunities for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: A Roundtable Discussion
Karen Pettus, University of South Carolina

Research documents the benefits of postsecondary education for students today. For students with intellectual disabilities, opportunities for inclusion in postsecondary settings can provide similar benefits. This roundtable discussion will include current research, the types of programs, and the benefits for all students. Participants will receive a list of relevant articles, websites, and internet resources.
Audience: All
higher education and transition

#8.10 Provide Better Services with Fewer Dollars: The Intersection of 10 Community Colleges
Esther Schon, Paradise Valley Community College
Gene Heppard, Phoenix College
Donna Young, Scottsdale Community College

This presentation presents a model on the process that Maricopa Community College District Disability Manager’s Council went through to improve services for students with disabilities through collaboration among colleges. Learn how MCCCD identified problem areas, recognized and surmounted obstacles and barriers, and developed strategies and solution that jeopardized the success and realization of the project.
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disability service centers

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Concurrent Block Nine

Saturday, July 19th 9:00 am – 10:30 am

#9.1 Converting Files for Alt Format
Ron Stewart, AHEAD

Moving files from one format to another has become one of the major headaches in the process of producing student-ready alternative format materials. This problem is being resolved by a variety of file conversion tools that are now appearing for the provider’s accommodation toolbox. In this session, we will talk about the issues that surround source files from a variety of providers and explore some of the tools that are now available to meet this challenging issue. Tools will be explored from the simple to the complex and from no-cost open-source to commercially available applications.
Audience: All
disability and technology

#9.2 Developing a Community of Practice: Working with Faculty to Make Courses Accessible
Karen Pettus, University of South Carolina

Communities of Practice, based on work by Lave and Wenger, believe that learning is social and comes from interacting with others. COP members are brought together by common activities and create relationships that develop around things that matter to the participants. Communities of practice are one way to support faculty partnerships in producing accessible materials for students with disabilities.
Audience: All
disability and the academic curriculum

#9.3 Disability & Diversity: Identifying Your DSS Intersection
Melanie Thompson, Southeast Missouri State University

As a DSS provider, do you seek the intersection between disability and diversity on your campus? With the increasing focus in administration on diversity, should you? A DSS Director will overview disability within the diversity literature, facilitate small group analysis of a case study, and moderate audience discussion to assist participants in developing their own game plan to address disability/diversity.
Audience: Intermediate
disability and diversity

#9.4 Disability Support Services: Examples of Best Practices for Supporting Students with LD and ADHD in the Community College Setting
Susan Trist, Western Nevada College
Alicia Brandon, Landmark College Institute for Research
Sandi Patton, North Harris Montgomery Community College

Across community colleges, learning disabilities (LD) and AD/HD are the fastest growing category of reported disabilities among college students today. This panel of DSS coordinators will provide an overview of identified best practices for supporting students with learning disabilities and AD/HD across a variety of community college environments. They will provide examples for: strategic planning and development; supporting academic success for students who struggle; supporting students in transition; providing staff and faculty development; and ways to support “success” as identified by students who struggle.
Audience: All
students with disabilities and disabilty service centers

#9.5 College Students and Graduates with Disabilities in the American Labor Market
Moderator: Ronnie Porter, Northeastern University
Panelists TBA

There is a high correlation between educational attainment and employability of individuals with disabilities. However, since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, the employment rate of individuals with disabilities has declined. This presents a significant challenge to colleges and universities. How can colleges strategically prepare students with disabilities to gain access to the labor market? The change in the American Labor Market created the need for a more highly educated work force. Internships and cooperative education experiences are becoming more important as a key strategy for entrance into the world of work. It is necessary to provide students with the tools that they need to successfully compete for these experiences and jobs. This presentation will focus on current labor market research and success strategies for students as they prepare to compete for these opportunities. Issues to be discussed will include: where to find experiential opportunities for students with disabilities, accommodations, relocating, transportation, disclosure, engaging in work based social activities and more.
Audience: All
disability and graduate/professional programs

#9.6 Career Strategies: A Discussion on Transition from Secondary Education Into the Workforce
Maureen Rice, Brigham Young University
Sherene Berghoff, Brigham Young University

Research consistently shows that the unemployment rate is high for individuals with disabilities. For those interested in helping their students with these concerns, this panel of psychologists will present an overview of an innovative university course specifically designed to teach career strategies to these students. Video clips from qualitative research will provide insights into career obstacles facing students with disabilities.
Audience: All
higher education and transition

#9.7 Counterintuitive Thinking and the Co-curriculum or How Project Reach Reconstructed Our Disability Services Office
Ken Marquard, Miami Dade College, Wolfson Campus

A national grant that creates a new intersection between disability and college civic engagement challenges notions of disability and has forced at least one disability service office to reconstruct itself. This presentation will describe the surprising overhaul, and will work with the audience to confront and engage other potential co-curricular areas as fertile ground to apply new principles of disability.
Audience: All
disability and the co-curriculum

#9.8 Building a Community of Practice: Lessons Learned in the Development of University-Wide Web-Based 508 Documentation Requirements
Sam Ogami, Stanford University

As technology becomes ubiquitous in the educational environment, individuals responsible for the procurement of these technologies must evaluate them and ensure they are accessible. However, there are no forums to share these local evaluations with others considering the same products. This workshop discusses one statewide university’s experience in developing a web-based repository for sharing Section 508 documentation.
Audience: All
disability and the policy environment

#9.9 Going a Different Direction in Providing Text Captioning Services: Intersecting DS and Remote Services
Emily Singer, Catholic University of America
Phil Hyssong, Alternative Communication Services, Inc.

This session will share how one school and one remote service worked together to provide real-time captioning on campus. Through a demonstration of remote captioning, we will share our experiences and provide tips on how to prepare you, your students and your institution for an exciting new way of providing communication access in your classrooms and beyond.
Audience: All
disability services

#9.10 Disability Services: Parasitic or Mutualistic?
Alberto Guzman, University of Arizona

This interactive presentation focuses on the powerful impact of the disability service industry on the construction of disability. Participants will explore negative and positive aspects of professionals and professions, using disability services in higher education as a platform. The session will include a short overview, small group exercise, and discussion.
Audience: All
disability and external forces