CONCURRENT SESSIONS

As you select your concurrent session choices, please note several vendor-sponsored sessions during Concurrent Block 8 on Friday morning. These sessions are provided to give attendees additional information about some products and services.

Neither AHEAD nor PEPNet expressly endorses any particular commercial entity.

Concurrent Block 1| Concurrent Block 2 | Concurrent Block 3

Concurrent Block 4| Concurrent Block 5 | Concurrent Block 6

Concurrent Block 7 | Concurrent Block 8 | Concurrent Block 9

The 2010 Conference offers a number of informative concurrent sessions arranged in Topical Tracks. While you may choose any session that you’d like, we offer these themes for those who want to explore particular topics in depth. Words in bold italics after each description indicate the topical tracks and areas.

Pre-selection of sessions you will attend is required. Please review the following session information, choose the one session during each block that you will attend, and indicate those choices on your Conference Registration Form.

Concurrent Block 1

Wednesday, July 14, 2010  9:00 am - 11:00 am

#1.1 Pulse Pen in Higher Education

Jayme Johnson, High Tech Center Training Unit, California Community Colleges

The Pulse Pen is an innovative combination of pen, audio recorder, and computer, that allows for efficient note taking, studying, and sharing in an online learning community. Using a sophisticated reference system to create a paper-based interface, the Pulse Pen can be used to capture audio and written information as well as an interactive playback and interface system. In addition to the traditional writing and reading via paper, the information can also be uploaded to a computer and further processed to provide alternate formats and multiple options for distribution and sharing content. In addition to being used as a note taking solution, the Pulse Pen also offers exciting capabilities as an instructional technology. Participants will learn about the Pulse Pen system and the various components, as well as how to use the Pulse Pen as a note taking accommodation. Strategies for effective note-taking will be discussed, and an overview of the online community will be provided to give a better understanding of how the Pulse Pen can be used in different contexts. Participants will learn how to use the Pulse Pen to create basic demos of functional programs, mathematic calculations, and foreign language translation, in addition to using the Pulse Pen to take notes and effectively interact with the notes in a study session.

Audience: Novice

AT Hands-On Lab                                                               

#1.2 Making Your Mark in Disability Services as a New Professional

This first session for new and newer service providers brings together four seasoned professionals to highlight disability services as a career field and offer strategies for effective services delivery.  It offers a chance to meet other “new” professionals and get oriented to the wealth and depth of the work.

Ten Tips for New Disability Service Providers

Shelley Ducatt, Texas Tech University

Tamara Mancini, Texas Tech University

Entering the field of Disability Services can be overwhelming. Learning to navigate the political climate of a campus while effectively serving students can be tricky. Through this interactive session, participants will learn strategies for connecting with students and faculty, keeping-up with changing laws and technologies, and collaborating with other campus support systems.

Disability Services as a Career-Why we love it...in spite of it!

Jean Ashmore, Rice University

Anne Reber, Texas A&M University

Helicopter parents? Shrinking budgets? Litigation? With a light-hearted approach and serious intent, these presenters will highlight the top reasons for choosing a career in disability services - and sticking with it. Years of experience between the presenters yield sage and sound advice for any newcomer to the field. Walk away with tangible ideas and a renewed passion for your work.

Audience: Novice

New and Newer DS

#1.3 Intersecting within Diversity on our Campuses & Profession

Ruth Warick, The University of British Columbia

Jenny Dugger, Drexel University

Jose J. Soto, Southeast Community College Area

Melanie V. Thompson, Southeast Missouri State University

Disability within diversity is approached differently among institutions of higher education. In this session, a panel of disability professionals discuss the organizational frameworks for advancing diversity work in relation to disability on their campus. Initiatives and strategies to include disability within diversity work will be shared. Challenges will be identified and an opportunity for discussion will be provided.

Audience: All

Diverse Viewpoints

#1.4 Returning Veterans: Supporting the Transition to College from

a Distance

Kelly Hermann, SUNY Empire State College

Linda Frank, SUNY Empire State College

Transitioning to college for returning veterans can be a challenging experience for students and faculty. As a ACE/Walmart Success for Veterans’ Initiative grant recipient, we have developed comprehensive educational modules regarding the needs of veterans transitioning to college. Participants will be given a guided tour of these online resources as well as tips and strategies to work with returning veterans.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Emerging Student Populations

#1.5 Documentation Gone Green: Operating the DS Office with Nominal Need for Documentation

Adam Meyer, Eastern Michigan University

The current DS paradigm revolves heavily around the concept that documentation is required for students to access disability services. This presentation will review one college’s year long journey from operating under the “must submit documentation for accommodation services” model to operating under the notion that quality campus services can be provided with minimal to no documentation in most cases.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Innovations and Outcomes

#1.6 Transitioning Students with Learning Disabilities into the World of Work

Gretchen Walsh, Notre Dame College

Marcie Anne Estepp, Notre Dame College

Shane Duncan, Notre Dame College

Disability service programs and career services programs in higher education must provide comprehensive services to students with learning disabilities to equip them with tools and strategies necessary to make a successful transition into the world of work. DSS coaches will present their findings from the integration of a career component into a program for students with learning differences.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Preparing Students for Careers

#1.7 Physical Access: Being an Agent for Campus Change and Compliance, Part I

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

James Bostrom, U.S. Department of Justice

Jack Catlin, LCM Architects

DSS professionals and colleagues may have the opportunity to influence changes in accessibility on their campus. Armed with basic knowledge and practical approaches, they can provide critical input for increasing physical access for students and others. Join two experienced architects and a former DOJ enforcement attorney for informative presentations, photos of good and bad examples, best practices, and regulation updates. Part II follows after the break.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

ADA @ 20 Years

#1.8 Strategic Planning: A, B, C’s (Assessment, Budget and Communication)

Emily Singer, The Catholic University of America

Tom Thompson, William R. Harper College

Karen Pettus, University of South Carolina

Learn about gathering data, developing resources and creative/strategic ways to communicate about the needs of your program and the presence of students with disabilities on campus. Three presenters from different settings will share their experiences and successes, while engaging you in dialogue about your campus.

Audience: All                                                                                     

Topics in Disability Services: Management

#1.9 Transforming your Campus to Work with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders/Asperger’s Syndrome Part I

Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut School of Law

Lisa King, St. Catherine University

Lorraine Wolf, Boston University

This multi-part workshop is designed to provide participants with a model for educating stakeholders and introduce change to their campus in order to provide the support and integration necessary for students with autism spectrum disorders to be successful. We will review areas of difficulty commonly faced in academic, residential, social and co-curricular domains. Information will be provided to improve service delivery across multiple settings. Part II follows after the break.

Audience: Intermediate                                

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#1.10 Global Perspective of Challenges that Students with Invisible Disabilities Face

Bea Awoniyi, The Florida State University

Ruth Aderanti, Babcock University

Disability is a human characteristic. Therefore, it does not matter whether you live in Los Angeles, United States or Lagos, Nigeria. The impact of disability is far reaching and has no geographic boundary. The challenge for those who live with disabilities and have to deal with them in educational institutions is often compounded by the lack of understanding and education of those who hold the access key to their educational progress and persistence. Two studies conducted using two different approaches (quantitative and qualitative approaches) in two different and diverse continents of the world will be discussed. Results of the studies and implications for disability service providers and college/university faculties will also be shared.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

International Perspectives

#1.11 Assistive Technology 101: A Live Demonstration of AT in Action

Tim Montgomery, The University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Andrew Luiz, Easter Seals of Southern Nevada

Assistive technology can be an invaluable resource for students with various disabilities to achieve equal access to curriculum and course materials. This technology can also be intimidating and a source of frustration to service providers, students and faculty/staff on campuses. The target audience will be new disability service providers, single person DSS offices and/or others unfamiliar with types of assistive technologies. This presentation will provide an overview and demonstration of assistive technologies. Participants will gain a clearer understanding and knowledge of various types of support technology (including but not limited to; various screen reader technologies, alternative media format for texts/course materials, speech recognition software, etc.) along with a first hand, live experience of those types of technologies. An emphasis will be placed on highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each type of technology along with effective strategies for use and strategic placement on campuses.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

Assistive Technology

#1.12 LD/ADHD College Coaching: A Wellness Model Celebrating Diversity

As postsecondary students become increasingly diverse, DS professionals promulgate Universal Design practices that anticipate and respond to a wide range of learner needs and preferences. This four-session symposium (#1.12, #2.12, #3.12, #4.12) focuses on LD/ADHD college coaching, an emerging “wellness” service delivery model, as an example of human-centered design. It updates last year’s popular preconference on ADHD coaching with new demonstrations, current research findings, and provocative discussions.

Session 1: Discover the Power of College Coaching: Not Just for Students with ADHD?

Jodi Sleeper-Triplett, JST Coaching, LLC

Coaching for college students reaches beyond academics and, perhaps, students with ADHD. For many postsecondary students with executive functioning issues, coaching helps them develop or refine techniques for greater focus, organization, time and task management, and other essential tools for effective daily living. These skills are the building blocks for success in college and the future. By facilitating access to coaching services, DS providers are able to motivate students and help them build self-confidence and self-awareness. This interactive session will offer information, handouts, demonstrations and discussion valuable to disability service providers, allied professionals, other campus partners and, by extension, the students and parents who contact DS offices.

Audience: All                                                                                             

Topics in Disability Services: Coaching

#1.13 Difference, Privilege, and Oppression: A Dialogue about Relationships and Responsibilities

Scott Marshall, University of Minnesota

Sean Virnig, University of Minnesota

Oppression. Power. Privilege. Difference. For many people these are uncomfortable concepts to consider. Using a case study, dialogue, self-reflection, and presentation, this interactive workshop will challenge participants to: 1. Confront notions and perceptions of concepts such as privilege, oppression, and power, 2. Consider various roles and responsibilities, and 3. Commit to identifying and practicing alternative approaches in higher education.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

PEPNet

#1.14 Resources Every Educational Interpreter Should Know About

Denise Kavin, PEPNet-Northeast

Josie Durkow, PEPNet-Northeast

Lori Hutchison,PEPNet-Northeast

Desiree Duda, PEPNet-Northeast

This presentation will cover various resources available through the Postsecondary Education Programs-Network to assist sign language interpreters in educating faculty about the unique communication needs of deaf postsecondary students. These resources include the PEPNet Dissemination Center which offers various products and materials related to serving deaf and hard of hearing including tipsheets, handbooks, videotapes, newsletters, etc., a listserv for personnel working with such students, and online training modules.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

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Concurrent Block 2

Wednesday, July 14, 2010  11:30 am - 12:30 pm

#2.1 Universally-Designed Course Materials

Jesse Hausler, Colorado State University

Marla Roll, Colorado State University

The Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) provides a convenient way to transport, view, and print electronic documents. PDF files are typically created in other applications like Microsoft Word and PowerPoint. They can also be produced by scanning the pages of a book or journal article. This session will focus on tools and techniques to assist faculty and other content creators in maximizing the accessibility of the PDF documents that they create. This session examines some of the features that make PDF documents more usable by a diverse audience. It also provides techniques for improving the accessibility of existing and new PDF documents.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

AT Hands-On Lab

#2.2 Infusing AHEAD’s Values into Service Delivery

Cheryl Muller, University of Arizona

Carol Funckes, University of Arizona

AHEAD enumerates its values as including a sociopolitical paradigm of disability; diversity; equitable, sustainable and usable environments; student autonomy; and collaboration. Yet, DS roles are usually defined in terms of accommodation delivery and compliance consultation, and training traditionally focuses on accommodation determination/coordination and policy/procedure development. As new professionals find their days quickly over-filling with individual issues, the presenters offer strategies for contributing to the larger agenda while providing services.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

New and Newer DS

#2.3 Disability as Just Another Form of Diversity

Kirsten Behling, Suffolk University

How do you incorporate disability into your campus climate? Suffolk University developed an interactive, reflective workshop that asks the audience to consider how disability impacts their life, examines perceptions of disabilities, and places disability as a diversity. You will experience the workshop and walk away with a toolkit for bringing it home with little effort but a lot of success.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Diverse Viewpoints

#2.4 Cultural Experiences of College Students with Disabilities: How do Cultural Elements Support or Hinder Academic Progress?

Beverley Argus-Calvo, The University of Texas at El Paso

Neelam Agrawal, The University of Texas at El Paso

This presentation examines how cultural elements are perceived by Mexican and Mexican American students with disabilities and the impact of such in their daily struggles towards achieving a college degree.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

Emerging Populations

#2.5 Disability Microaggressions: Increasing Institutional Sensitivity to Subtle Forms of Ableism

Richard Keller, Teachers College, Columbia University

Corinne Galgay, Teachers College, Columbia University

Danielle Ryan, Teachers College, Columbia University

This lecture will present research demonstrating the existence of microaggressions, or subtle acts of discrimination, toward people with disabilities. Lead researcher, Richard Keller, PhD, will identify eight microaggressions, discuss their effects on people with disabilities, and suggest implications for further research. A discussion on preventing ableism at participants’ home institutions will follow the lecture.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Innovations and Outcomes

#2.6 The Economy and College Graduates with Disabilities:

Access and Transition

Veronica Porter, Northeastern University

The economy has had a major impact on the labor market. Gaining access to employment requires an understanding of the labor market and how choices made by students can affect transition to employment. This session will discuss the current labor market conditions, and discuss strategies for helping students transition from college to employment.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Preparing Students for Careers

#2.7 Physical Access: Being an Agent for Campus Change and

Compliance, Part II

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

James Bostrom, U.S. Department of Justice

Jack Catlin, LCM Architects

DSS professionals and colleagues may have the opportunity to influence changes in accessibility on their campus. Armed with basic knowledge and practical approaches, they can provide critical input for increasing physical access for students and others. Join two experienced architects and a former DOJ enforcement attorney for informative presentations, photos of good and bad examples, best practices, and regulation updates.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

ADA @ 20 Years

#2.8 Expanding Cultural Awareness of Exceptional Learners (EXCEL) in Postsecondary Environments

Hilary Gerdes, University of Oregon

Allison Lombardi, University of Oregon

Christopher Murray, University of Oregon

This presentation provides an overview a project that promotes organizational supports for postsecondary students with disabilities through a train-the-trainer model of faculty development, web-based resources for faculty, and the distribution of print-based materials for faculty. Session participants will receive a CD containing all of our training materials and copies of our campus-wide assessment tools.

Audience: Intermediate                                

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#2.9 Transforming your Campus to Work with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders/Asperger’s Syndrome Part II

Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut School of Law

Lisa King, St. Catherine’s University

Lorraine Wolf, Boston University

This workshop is designed to provide participants with a model for educating stakeholders and introduce change to their campus in order to provide the support and integration necessary for students with autism spectrum disorders to be successful. We will review areas of difficulty commonly faced in academic, residential, social and co-curricular domains. Information will be provided to improve service delivery across multiple settings.

Audience: Intermediate                                

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#2.10 Considering Culture: Working with International Students with Disabilities

Olivia Hardin, Mobility International USA

Alisyn Henneck, Mobility International

International students with disabilities are appearing on U.S. campuses eager to benefit from the same educational opportunities as their peers. Learn practical methods to advise international students with disabilities on navigating new adaptive technologies, evaluating insurance coverage, providing documentation, adapting to U.S. disability culture, and other considerations.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

International Perspectives

#2.11 Creating Accommodations for Higher Education’s Diverse Learners the Next Step Way

Tammy Day, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center

Attend this session to learn about the Next Step Program, which was created to support students with intellectual disabilities. Partnering with the their local technology center, the two-year certificate program develops each student’s personalized and comprehensive Program of Study including detailed full-day schedules and tools such as assistive technology software to foster independent living and guide career development and employment.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

Assistive Technology

#2.12 LD/ADHD College Coaching: A Wellness Model Celebrating Diversity

Session 2: What Do We Know? – Highlights from 20 Years of

Coaching Research

Sarah Wright, Sarah Wright Coaching & Consulting

Despite being relatively new on postsecondary campuses, coaching has an extensive theoretical foundation and research base. Executive and personal coaching has been studied in numerous countries for over two decades. More recently, studies of ADD college coaching have begun to appear in the literature. This presentation will summarize key themes and meaningful findings from this body of evidence and identify remaining questions that call for ongoing research.

Audience: All                                                                                             

Topics in Disability Services: Coaching

#2.13 Captioning Beyond Compliance: Making Today’s Media Format Accessible: YouTube, iTunes and Captured Lectures

Pat Brogan, Automatic Sync Technologies

Captioning is typically done as an accommodation for a specific student. This session explains the value of captioning beyond compliance for improved learning, and shows options for captioning. Special focus on captioning for popular media types like YouTube, iTunes and recorded lectures will be covered.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

#2.14 PEPNet’s Online College Guide

Cindy Camp, PEPNet-South, Jacksonville State University

Loriann Macko, PEPNet-Northeast, NTID

Deaf and hard of hearing students often struggle to locate colleges and universities which cater to their specific disability. This presentation will provide an overview of a new online resource for students, parents, teachers, and counselors to locate “deaf friendly” colleges and postsecondary programs.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

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Concurrent Block 3

Wednesday, July 14, 2010  2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

#3.1 Explore Clockwork Scheduling and Database Software

Barouch Chai, Microcomputer Science Centre Inc

Mike Dinunzio, TechnoPro Solutions

ClockWork Database Scheduler software is researched and designed by universities and colleges to be used by the disability and counseling centers at colleges and universities. Meetings, counseling appointments, availability schedules, exams / tests, workshops, events, rooms and resources are easily entered and tracked. The scheduler eliminates confusion and conflicts by centralizing the appointment data and making everyone’s schedule immediately available at any time. Clockwork is flexible and has a customizable data forms generator that lets the user create all type of forms quickly and easily. It assists in appointment assessment and notes management, accommodations letters and management, exam and test booking, note-taking management, batch emailing and well as a more extensive permissions system. Clockwork has built-in customizable report generator that provides handy statistics and standardizes reporting.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

AT Hands-On Lab

#3.2 Identity Development in an Ableistic Society

Arlene Stewart, Clemson University

Hal Stevens, Clemson University

The presenters will discuss the concept of identity development for individuals with disabilities in an ableistic society and show how it can be an important variable in service provision and program management. A developmental model for students with and without disabilities that has implications for social change will be presented and discussed.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

New and Newer DS

#3.3 Broken Bodies, Twisted Minds: Disability as Evil in Literature and Fiction

Edith Miller, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

Julianne Albiero-Walton, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

This presentation examines the portrayal of characters with physical disabilities as evil in seven examples of western literature and fiction across four centuries from Shakespeare to Dan Brown. The foundations are explored through medieval church teachings and Biblical passages that express what Lane (1999) calls “victim theology” and traced through the Age of Enlightenment and Victorian sensibilities to current attitudes.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

Diverse Viewpoints

#3.4 Keys to Understanding and Serving College Students with Chronic Illnesses

Christine Goodwin, St. John’s University - New York

As the field of medicine continues to advance, more students with chronic illnesses will be able to fulfill their dreams of earning a college degree. This mixed-method study will show how institutions are serving this population. Disabled Student Service Coordinators who need to be prepared to support this population will be provided with guidelines and suggestions for future innovations.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Emerging Student Populations

#3.5 Perceptions of Communication, Classroom Interaction Frequency, and Academic Achievement in Online Classes

Gary Long, National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Richard Fasse, Rochester Institute of Technology

James Mallory, Rochester Institute of Technology

An increase in online course enrollments by deaf students at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) combined with positive student perceptions of communication ease and learning, caused us to examine the potential link of this online format to academic achievement (GPA). Research findings and their implications regarding access to learning for deaf students in mainstream settings will be discussed.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Innovations and Outcomes

#3.6 Simmer and Serve: An Easy Recipe for Student Success and

Career Development

Brittany Burnett, Maryland Department of Disabilities

Jade Gingerich, Maryland Department of Disabilities

This session presents a replicable model of highly effective career development workshops proven to increase employment outcomes for students with disabilities. By taking advantage of existing career development resources on campus, these low-cost programs can be easily replicated through active collaboration with Career Services. We will provide electronic copies of documents and materials for easy editing and replication.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Preparing Students for Careers

#3.7 AHEAD and CAS: Framing the Dialogue for Self-Evaluation

Kate Broderick, Old Dominion University

Beth Hunsinger, The Community College of Baltimore

Many Student Affairs professionals use the CAS Standards to evaluate whether their programs are meeting their goals. With the release of “Learning Reconsidered” and other professional programs, learning goals in addition to student development must be evaluated. This program will examine the relationship between AHEAD and CAS, discuss initiatives by CAS to evaluate how the disability standards are being used, and suggest ways that attendees may use the CAS Disability Standards to assess goals using basic self-assessment techniques.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#3.8 The AccessText Network Update: Improving the Accessibility of College Textbooks

Christopher Lee, AccessText Network

Presenters will discuss and demonstrate the AccessText Network (ATN), an initiative of the Association of American Publishers, and give an update of their first year of operation. The ATN improves the accessibility of college textbooks by providing a simple, consistent method for a college’s disabled student service office to request and receive electronic files from the largest academic publishers in the country.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#3.9 Social Dyslexia/Social Thinking: Understanding Students with

Autism Spectrum Disorders

Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut School of Law

Lorraine Wolf, Boston University

Social thinking is a term used by Michelle Garcia Winner to define the behavior used to think as a social being in interpersonal interaction. Using social thinking is a skill many people with ASD need to learn, it does not come naturally the way it does with most college students. When social thinking is impaired by social dyslexia, how do we as college service providers accommodate? This session will look at the concept of Social Dyslexia and apply social thinking for college students with autism spectrum disorders.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#3.10 Barcelona to Buenos Aires: Application of the ADA to Study Abroad Programs

Christine Street, Washington University in St. Louis

Providing accommodations abroad is difficult. This presentation, by a DSS professional and attorney, will provide an overview of the ADA’s extraterritorial application. Effective practices for making accommodations abroad that value students and improve diversity will be discussed, as will case studies for accommodating students with various disabilities, including hearing impairments. There will be ample time for questions and discussion.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

International Perspectives

#3.11 Strategies for Coordinating Organizational and Technology

Resources to Increase Assistive Technology on Campus

Jeremiah Woolsey, California State University, Dominguez Hills

Mohammad Eyadat, California State University, Dominguez Hills

Ron Bergmann, California State University, Dominguez Hills


To effectively implement accessible technology initiatives in an academic environment, the number of organizations and departments involved must act in a unified manner. This article examines how a campus Assistive Technology Committee can act in a matrix-based organizational approach to develop and implement strategies to deliver the best assistive technologies available.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

Assistive Technology

#3.12 LD/ADHD College Coaching: A Wellness Model Celebrating Diversity

Session 3: Coaching - Helping Individuals and Groups Thrive in Challenging Academic Environments

Theresa E. Laurie Maitland, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Kristen Rademacher, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

David R. Parker, Wayne State University


This presentation will summarize the research design and initial findings from a pilot study of coaching services provided at a highly competitive public university. These services are provided in-person by disability service providers who have been trained as coaches. The presenters will also describe how coaching is being provided in group settings to promote the academic/life success of transfer students as well as freshmen. The presenters will describe how coaching has changed how they think about students and which students they think could benefit from coaching.

Audience: All                                                                                             

Topics in Disability Services: Coaching

#3.13 Guide to Access Planning: Developing Self-Advocacy Skills in Teens for Communication Access

Cheryl Johnson, THE ADVantage

Carrie Spangler, Stark County Education Service Center

Discover a program to assist teens who are deaf and hard of hearing, their parents, and professionals with developing self-advocacy skills related to communication access and hearing/hearing loss associated technologies. This interactive CD ROM focuses on knowledge and skills that teens need to know to be independent and sophisticated users of hearing and assistive technology and the requisite accommodations.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

#3.14 “Remote Text Services” After You’ve Made the Decision

Philip Hyssong, Alternative Communication Services

Schools throughout the country are opting for remote text services for students with hearing loss. However, they are missing some key steps in understanding the process that is leading to disappointment and frustration. This workshop will allow participants to troubleshoot the toughest challenges and be ready for a successful remote text experience.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

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Concurrent Block 4

Wednesday, July 14, 2010  3:30 pm - 4:45 pm

#4.1 Delivering Captioned Media: in iTunes U, YouTube, and Web Pages

Sean Keegan, Stanford University

Creating caption files is just one step to delivering captioned presentations. Integrating the caption file with the original media is another important step to ensure access to the final presentation. This hands-on presentation will identify different methods for including captions in the iTunes U, YouTube, and Web page environment as well as considerations for using accessible, Web-based media players.

Audience: Intermediate

AT Hands-On Lab           

#4.2 Transition to College for Students with Asperger's Syndrome: Challenges and Strategies for the New Provider

Lisa King, St. Catherine’s University

Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut, School of Law

This presentation is designed to provide disability providers new to working with students with autism spectrum disorders with an overview of Asperger Syndrome as a disability condition on college campuses, address evidenced-based practices for facilitating smooth transitions for the first year student and provide the novice DS provider tools to work proactively rather than reactively with this complex population. Participants will obtain tools, strategies and sample templates to use and adapt in different settings.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

New and Newer DS

#4.3 Diversity, Disability and Design: A Panel of Perspectives

Kaela Parks, University of Alaska Anchorage

Tom Thompson, William R Harper College

Melanie Thompson, Southeast Missouri State University

Scott McAward, University of Utah


A panel of professionals discuss examples from their individual campuses that showcase how institutions can move beyond a strict compliance model to proactively plan for a wide range of users. Examples include partnerships and collaborations, design decisions, policy developments, budgeting approaches, and programming that foster inclusive campus climates. Participants will be encouraged to share their own experiences.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Diverse Perspectives

#4.4 Providing Disability Services to Students with Intellectual Disabilities

Cate Weir, Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Debra Hart, Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Meg Grigal, TransCen., Inc.

Changes to the Higher Education Opportunity Act (2008) have encouraged the development of postsecondary education opportunities for students with intellectual disabilities. This session will review the HEOA provisions related to students with intellectual disabilities, describe the current state of the practice as determined by a recently completed national survey, and discuss emerging best practices in the provision of appropriate accommodations and services to students with ID.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Emerging Student Populations

#4.5 Universal Design in Education and Campus Accessibility - Best Practices: Overview of Pre-conference Symposium

Aura Hirschman, R2D2 Center, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Conference attendees who are interested in campus-wide issues of universal design and accessibility are invited to this overview of the presentations and best practices shared at the Universal Design in Education Pre-conference Symposium. Presenters will offer a snapshot of existing best practices relative to the infusion of universal design into campus accessibility policies and practices regarding the instructional, service, media and physical environments.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

Innovations and Outcomes

#4.6 National Service Programs: The Next Step for Students with

Disabilities in Preparing for Employment

Sheila Fesko, Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Gayann Brandenburg, CTAT Denver Options

Service learning, volunteering and internships are tools that students with disabilities can use to obtain experience and develop their resume as well as making connections that will support their job search. Staff from a national center on Service to Employment for Individuals with Disabilities will present case studies of national service programs practices that promote employment outcomes for service participants with disabilities.

Audience: Novice                                                                                            

Preparing Students for Careers

#4.7 Section 508 Goes to College

Gaeir Dietrich, High Tech Center Training Unit, California Community Colleges

Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act pertains to electronic and information technology (E&IT) on college campuses throughout California. Does it apply to your state and college too? Come find out how the Section 508 standards affect you and your college.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

ADA @ 20 Years

#4.8 Success Strategies for Students with Learning and Attention

Challenges in STEM Courses

Heather Haeger, University of Arizona, SALT Center

Claudia Sandoval, University of Arizona, SALT Center

Jennifer Bell, University of Arizona

Many college students with learning disabilities struggle in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses and as a result, are steered away from majors in these fields. This interactive session will address issues affecting students in these courses and will outline strategies to improve student success in STEM classes and majors.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#4.9 Building Disability Service Policies Collaboratively -a 2010 AHEAD Initiative

Jean Ashmore, Rice University

In 2010 AHEAD initiated an interactive member “think tank” on the essential elements for inclusion in campus policies on animals, housing accommodations, and other “hot” topics. “Guiding questions” for development of a solid policy were combined with members’ best practice suggestions. The results are excellent member resources useful in writing site-specific disability service policies. This concurrent session will review outcomes from this innovative resource development process, provide a demonstration on how to use this approach and discuss AHEAD’s future plans using this methodology.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#4.10 Accessible Media Policies: A Canadian Model for Development, Implementation and Sustainability in Post-Secondary Institutions

Karen Walker, George Brown College

Anne Villahermosa, George Brown College

Effectively developing an accessible media policy in a postsecondary institution requires a model based on change, development and implementation strategies to sustain the use of universal design principles in learning environments. This session will illustrate the policy model used at one provincial college and how it can be adapted for use at other postsecondary institutions.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

International Perspectives

#4.11 Getting Started with Dragon NaturallySpeaking version 10

Denice Roberts, ATP/WesTAC, University of Colorado Denver

Dragon NaturallySpeaking is a speech recognition software program designed to help individuals with disabilities access a computer to type or write down their thoughts. In this presentation creating a voice file, dictating a memo, correcting an existing document, and the command “mouse grid” will be demonstrated. The new commands for accessing the Web will also be demonstrated.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Assistive Technology

#4.12 LD/ADHD College Coaching: A Wellness Model Celebrating Diversity

Session 4: Quantifying the Effectiveness of Coaching for College

Students with ADHD: Initial Findings from a National Study

Sharon Field, Wayne State University

David R. Parker, Wayne State University

Robert M. Tudisco, Edge Foundation

Wayne State University has completed a one-year study of ADD coaching on 12 campuses from all four regions of the U.S. (including 2- and 4-year institutions). A randomized group design was used to compare the outcomes of undergraduates with ADHD who were coached with those who were not. Weekly coaching sessions were conducted by phone by highly trained Edge Foundation coaches. This study, the largest of its kind to date, utilized rigorous methods to explore the relationship between coaching and students’ GPA, persistence, self-regulation, and study skills. A number of students participated in qualitative interviews to shed more light on their perceptions of coaching. This presentation will summarize the research design and initial findings from this groundbreaking study.

Audience: All                                                                                                             

Topics in Disability Services: Coaching

#4.13 A National View: 2009 Postsecondary Interpreting and Speech-to-Text Salaries and Policies

Bambi Riehl, PEPNet/University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Curious how your institution compares to others in the U.S. or your region? This session provides participants abundant information about 120 institutions regarding interpreting and speech-to-text salaries, credentials, staffing patterns, working conditions and use of hourly and agency providers versus staff providers. The presenter will disseminate the main findings of the 2009 PEPNet Postsecondary Interpreting and Speech to Text Survey, and show participants how to access online results to make them useful in raising institutional awareness and developing sustainable, equitable models.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

#4.14 Delivering Remote Interpreting Services to Deaf Students in

Rural Areas

Barbara Keefe, PEPNet-Northeast

Lori Hutchison, PEPNet-Northeast

Joyce Gallagher, Owner, Sign Language Specialist of West Virginia

Lloyd Scott, Southwest Vermont Supervisory Union

Deaf students in rural areas are entitled to the same support services as their urban peers. Limited access to resources in remote regions of the country frequently compromise that expectation. Too often qualified interpreters are simply not available in these communities. Special education administrators are legally responsible for providing access to the curriculum for a student who is deaf. This panel of professionals will discuss the issues, and offer solutions to respond to this challenge.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

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Concurrent Block 5

Thursday, July 15, 2010  11:00 am - 12:30 pm

#5.1 Foreign Language E-Text Production: Techniques and Considerations

Teresa Haven, Arizona State University

Although the workshop will discuss general e-text production techniques as part of its foundation, participants should already be familiar with the basics of this process. Beginners who do not yet have knowledge or experience of e-text production are encouraged to take the E-Text Institute in advance of this workshop. This workshop will build on the basics of e-text production in English to prepare participants to appropriately produce e-text in other languages. Considerations will include roman versus non-roman writing systems, diacritics, and how various access technologies may interface with the text. Participants will practice producing sample materials in various languages and experience using the materials with different types of access technology.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

AT Hands-On Lab

#5.2 Disability Service Providers As Faculty Developers: It’s a New World!

Elizabeth Harrison, University of Dayton

Increasingly, Disability Service providers are recognizing the important role that good design plays in the inclusion of students with disabilities. Active outreach to faculty members has minimized the need for individual accommodations and improved the academic experiences of growing numbers of students. However, for new professionals, taking on the role of ‘faculty developer’ can feel like entering a whole new, not-so-friendly world. Come learn and discuss successful strategies for engaging faculty in the creation of inclusive academic experiences.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

New and Newer DS

#5.3 Yes We Can! Disability Studies and Disability Services Finding Common Ground

Michael Rembis, University of Arizona

Randy Borst, University at Buffalo

Susan Mann Dolce, University at Buffalo

Karen Pettus, University of South Carolina

Moderated roundtable describing and discussing the individual and joint work of the Center for Disability Studies and Disability Services at the University at Buffalo from January to June 2010, including what worked, what didn’t, lessons learned and possible strategies for finding common ground and moving forward.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Diverse Viewpoints

#5.4 Understanding and Advising First-Year Students with Executive Function Disorders

Sarah Crowther, Culver-Stockton College

This workshop will address the increasing trend of students arriving unprepared to navigate college due to executive function disorders. This workshop will explore the definition of EF, early detection, intervention and advising methods for bringing structure and order to what can become a chaotic first semester.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

Emerging Student Populations

#5.5 Universal Design for Instruction: Applications in Modern Language Classrooms and Technology-Enhanced Courses

Sally Scott, University of Mary Washington

Joan McGuire, University of Connecticut

Manju Banerjee, University of Connecticut

Wade Edwards, Longwood University

Applications of Universal Design for Instruction (UDI) are being explored in college classrooms. Examples and demonstrations of instructional strategies from two faculty projects will be shared: one in the discipline of modern languages and one that is focused on the integration of low-cost, no-cost e-tools in blended and online courses. Discussion will include strategies for promoting inclusive instruction on campus.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Innovations and Outcomes

#5.6 Providing Effective Career Guidance for Federal Employment and AmeriCorps Service Opportunities

Kathy McCreedy, DiverseAbility LLC

Cathy McAdam, M. Catherine McAdam ACSW LLC

Paula Sotnik, National Service Inclusion Project

Star Smith, US Internal Revenue Service

DSS professionals working with partners in Career Services are seeking ways to improve student employment outcomes after graduation. This panel of practitioners, who support students with disabilities in obtaining opportunities in AmeriCorps and federal job opportunities, will share practical guidance on accessing information about these opportunities, including the use of Schedule A hiring authority for federal job positions.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Preparing Students for Careers

#5.7 The 2008 Higher Education Opportunity Act: Implications for

Disability Services Offices

Wendy Harbour, Syracuse University

Debra Hart, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Judy Shanley, U.S. Department of Education

The 2008 Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) created an unprecedented level of federal involvement in postsecondary disability issues. Changes affect how campuses share information about disability services, access to college and financial aid for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and funding for research and development grants. This panel will share information about the HEOA and implications for disability services.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

ADA@20 Years

#5.8 Learn How to Save Time and Money Acquiring Braille and

Electronic Textbooks.

Mike Bastine, Alternate Text Production Center

Sandy Greenberg, Alternate Text Production Center

Jaime Montgomery, Alternate Text Production Center

The Alternate Text Production Center (ATPC) will provide time and money saving ways to acquire alternative textbooks. New resources and services will be highlighted to attain Braille and Electronic Textbooks (E-Text) products. The ATPC will define quality Braille; Braille’s future in the classroom; and the Center’s new capabilities to fulfill textbook requests for students with print related disabilities.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#5.9 A High School-College Collaboration to Prepare Students with Disabilities for College

Linda Lopez, Nassau BOCES Alternative Learning Program

Genette Alvarez-Ortiz, Nassau Community College

Low college retention of students with social and learning disabilities has been attributed to poor preparation during high school for college demands. A high school psychologist and a college counselor will describe a five-year collaboration between a high school for students with disabilities and a community college that provides direct instruction in life skills needed for college success.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Transition to College

#5.10 Growing Our Documentation Requirements to Meet the Growing Need

Jane Jarrow, Disability Access Information and Support/DCCOL

L. Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

The ADA Amendments Act. The explosion of online and hybrid classes. The significant influx of returning vets, students with Asperger’s Syndrome, and more. The students and the environment have evolved over time, our documentation practices adapt as well! Join two of the field’s trusted practitioners as they suggest how to meet new challenges and greet new students.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#5.11 Selecting Software for Students with Learning Disabilities

Jayme Johnson, High Tech Center Training Unit, California Community Colleges

Selecting appropriate educational software for students with learning disabilities can often be a difficult and complicated process. This online resource helps faculty identify appropriate and effective educational software to deal with specific cognitive deficits as identified through the common learning disability testing instruments. Learn how this resource came to be created, and how you can use it.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Assistive Technology

#5.12 Reframing Learning Styles: Engaging Traditional & Nontraditional Learners

Myra Lerch, Butte College

This interactive presentation will provide a fresh framework for understanding a diverse range of learners, traditional and nontraditional. It will introduce the recently-developed Learning Styles Profile and the concept of the passive/active divide. Tangible tools/strategies will be demonstrated. Specific teaching strategies based on universal design concepts in learning will be modeled throughout the presentation, including opportunities for active participation.

Audience: All                                                     

Topics in Disability Services: Curriculum and Instruction

#5.13 Promoting Genuine Access with Sign Language Interpreters: Best Practices for Hiring, Screening, Utilization, and Development

Karen Kazlowski Graham, SignOn: A Sign Language Interpreting Resource

Janice Humphrey, SignOn: A Sign Language Interpreting Resource

It has long been assumed that providing a sign language interpreter offers inclusion to Deaf and Hard of Hearing students in postsecondary settings. In this round table discussion, participants will look at the truth of that assumption and ways to improve screening, hiring, and developing interpreters to maximize the inclusion and independence of DHH students.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

#5.14 A Think Tank: Providing Quality Communication Services in an Economic Struggle

Naomi Sheneman, Network Interpreting Service, Inc.

Colleges are suffering budget cuts which impact interpreting and speech-to-text service provisions. This Think Tank will discuss two main questions: 1. What creative solutions did your organization come up with to ensure quality services were still being provided with limited funds available? 2. What steps are being taken to avoid making Deaf/Hard of Hearing students feel liable for the costs?

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

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Concurrent Block 6

Thursday, July 15, 2010  2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

#6.1 Real World Tools and Techniques for Accessible Instructional

Materials (AIM)

Ron Stewart, AltFormat Solutions LLC; Chair, AHEAD Instructional Materials Accessibility Group

One of the most problematic and significant issues facing the success of students with disabilities in today’s educational environment is the timely and efficient access to instructional materials and systems. This hands-on session will take a pragmatic look at tools that we have found most robust in the work of the AHEAD Instructional Materials Accessibility Group and will explore tools and techniques that have been developed to try and make the process more efficient and effective.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

AT Hands-On Lab

#6.2 Online 101: An Introduction to Online and Distance Education

Julie Scaff, University of Phoenix

Kelly Hermann, Empire State College

Robert Becker, University of Phoenix-Online Campus

Online course offerings are taking an increasingly more visible role at many universities across the country. This session offers new and seasoned DS providers an opportunity to get up to speed on how online programs work. Examples of various online learning management systems, a review of commonly used terms in the online educational arena, and considerations for access and accommodations in the online and distance education settings will be presented and discussed.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

New and Newer DS

#6.3 Disability Culture Through the Eyes of College Students with Varying Physical Disabilities

Anjali Forber-Pratt, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

This study presents views of four people with physical disabilities on their perceptions of disability culture. Qualitative, participatory research methods were used. In-depth interviews were conducted to capture interpretations of the core features of disability culture. This is important, as these individuals are the first generation to have lived all or the majority of their lives covered by the ADA.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Diverse Perspectives

#6.4 Vets-to-Vets Project

Gaeir Dietrich, High Tech CenterTraining Unit, California Community Colleges

Myra Lerch, Butte College

The High Tech Center Training Unit (HTCTU) of the California community colleges has begun a pilot project to assist returning veterans in the re-entry transition to the community colleges by creating Veterans Resource Centers on campus. The VRC provides a model for assisting wounded warriors to reintegrate into the classroom setting.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Emerging Populations

#6.5 Partnering to Provide Expanded Mental Health Services to Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

Eric Wagenfeld, Indiana Purdue - Ft. Wayne

In challenging economic times, the need to provide increased services to students with psychiatric disabilities can be problematic. The presenter will provide an overview, and facilitate discussion on the development, implementation, and assessment data, of this institution’s partnership model of increased mental health care delivery, with a major regional health system, while reducing overall cost to the institution.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Innovations and Outcomes

#6.6 College Students and Graduates with Psychiatric Disabilities: Career Development and Employment Transition

Sarah Helm, The University of Tennessee

The presentation will focus specifically on students and recent graduates with psychiatric disabilities and will explore the career development, transition, and employment issues unique to this population. The presenter will review the recent literature on the topic and will discuss findings from a qualitative study focused on the career development experiences and employment concerns of university seniors with psychiatric disabilities.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Preparing Students for Careers

#6.7 From Compliance to Proactive Accessibility: How Small Institutions Create Success

Christie Gilson, Moravian College

Small, private institutions of higher education often find compliance with laws mandating accessibility particularly challenging. And yet, such institutions must comply with federal disability discrimination legislation, regulations, and court rulings. Presentation participants will examine case studies of challenging issues and collaboratively generate solutions for their institutions’ unique needs.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

ADA@20 Years

#6.8 Documentation for Students with Specific Learning Disabilities: A Collaborative Approach

Barbara Palmer, Colorado Department of Education

Greg Sullivan, Metropolitan State College of Denver

This interactive session, led by representatives of a collaborative work group composed of State Department, secondary school educators, school psychologists, parent representative, and college/university disability office directors will provide discussion of the documentation gap compounded by the changes in IDEA 2004 related to Specific Learning Disability eligibility criteria. A series of technical assistance materials will be shared.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#6.9 Parent or Professional: Which Hat Do I Wear Today?

Lisa Meeks, John Carroll University

Jane Jarrow, Disability Access Information and Support/DCCOL

Two experienced DS providers share their insights from their daughters’ freshman year. When you know what SHOULD be happening, how do you cope when it isn’t? Do you call the DS provider, or do you keep your mouth shut? What things do parents know that DS providers should know? Get a bird’s eye view of the empty (DS) nest.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Transition to College

#6.10 Process Model for Determining Reasonable Accommodations Based on Technical Standards

Susie Pletcher-Rood, Central Michigan University

Trey Stohlman, Central Michigan University

Many colleges and universities require students to demonstrate their ability to speak in a public setting by requiring a speech or communication class. But what is the best means by which to accommodate students with anxiety disorders in such a setting? The deliberative process and research results will be shared from a doctoral study conducted at Central Michigan University. Participants will have a model to follow when determining reasonable accommodations based on technical standards from this session.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#6.11 Presidential “Suspire”

Mike Shuttic, Oklahoma State University

Come take a “long deep breath” AKA “suspire” in this facilitated discussion with seasoned, knowledgeable DS providers on the more complex issues impacting the field. Focus on ideological perspectives, impacting variables, priorities and feasibility. The intent is on strategizing and identifying appropriate means of addressing needs and concerns within and without the DS field that have significant impact on persons with disabilities.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

Innovations and Outcomes

#6.12 Universal Design of Mathematics Instruction: A Collaborative Model

Michel Smith, Auburn University

Laura Smith, Auburn University

Tracy Donald, Auburn University

The Mathematics Department at a land-grant university, with the assistance of the disability services office, is in the process of implementing a multi-component approach to promote the improvement of undergraduate access, success and retention in mathematics courses and the enhancement of instruction of mathematics. Mathematics competency will allow students greater choice of major in college, and, career upon graduation.

Audience: All                                                                     

Topics in Disability Services: Curriculum and Instruction

#6.13 Doing More with Less: Scheduling and Communication Solutions for Disability Services Providers

Tia Ivanko, Bergen Community College

Jennifer Flynn, Bergen Community College

Maria Bohn, Bergen Community College

Disability service coordinators can easily become inundated with accommodations requests from students. This presentation will be a “show and show how-to” session for implementing online solutions to streamline communications and service requests from students. Various free online platforms will be demonstrated that have resulted in an efficient work flow, increased accessibility and availability of staff, and fostered self-sufficiency for the student population.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

#6.14 Supporting Students with Disabilities with Tablet PCs in

STEM Courses

Lisa Elliot, Rochester Institute of Technology

Pamela Francis, Rochester Institute of Technology

This presentation for administrators and support service personnel investigates the Universal Design for Instruction applications of Tablet PCs and a meaning-for-meaning text interpreting system in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses involving students who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing, those with learning disabilities, those who are English language learners, and those who do not have difficulty comprehending spoken English.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

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Concurrent Block 7

Thursday, July 15, 2010  4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

#7.1 Tools for Accessing and Interacting with Graphics

Lucia Hasty, Rocky Mountain Braille Associates

Course content may require a student to determine the atomic weight of selenium from the Periodic Table of Elements, identify the major cities in each of the European Union countries, graph a series of equations, meet a project team in the main building of the science complex. What tools are available for the blind or visually impaired student to independently access and interact with this information? What tools support production of accessible media? Through hands-on lab activities, participants will become familiar with software/ hardware combinations that support both production of and access to graphic materials. Technology covered: Touch tablets, SmartPen adaptive applications, audible graphing calculator, TMAP Project, Duxbury Braille Translation and QuickTac for graphics, and other new technologies. Participants are encouraged to bring projects requested by students as examples for group problem-solving discussion.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

AT Hands-On Lab

#7.2 How Much Flexibility? Exploring When Attendance/ Assignment Deadline Accommodations are Appropriate.

Melissa Engstrom, University of Minnesota

Linda Wolford, University of Minnesota

Disability services offices are seeing an increase of students with chronic health conditions, i.e. mental health and systemic conditions, and a corresponding increase in requests for modification of attendance requirements and assignments deadlines. Facilitators will share best practice resources and case scenarios to guide new and seasoned DS staff in considering the concept of “reasonableness”, the role of students and faculty, and the relevance of institutional policies and universal design in responding to these requests.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

New and Newer DS

#7.3 Intersection: Power, Privilege, and Disability

Gladys Loewen, University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Melanie Thornton, University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Power and privilege have played a significant role in maintaining discrimination in the history of minority groups, including people with disabilities. Little attention has been given to power and privilege as they relate to the provision of disability services and resources. This session will examine the intersection of disability, power and privilege in higher education and the intended and unintended outcomes of that juncture.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Diverse Perspectives

#7.4 Disability Services: Helping Those Who Serve Their Country

Brenda York, Montana State University

Disability Service offices across the country are a natural partner for helping returning veterans acclimate to the campus environment. This presentation will highlight the commonly seen afflictions of returning veterans and ways for disability services to help these veterans be successful on campus.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Emerging Student Populations

#7.5 The Documentation of Disability Debate: a Panel Discussion of a Controversial Issue

Michael Brooks, Brigham Young University

Adam Meyer, Eastern Michigan University

James Martin, University of Oklahoma

Gretchen Steil Weiss, Western Illinois University

DSS Coordinators make critical decisions regarding what level of disability documentation is required to receive services. Unfortunately, the law is largely silent on this issue, leaving many coordinators unsure of what requirements satisfy both their institutions’ and students’ needs. This moderated panel discussion of DSS directors will present the different approaches to this question and address implications for each position.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Innovations and Outcomes

#7.6 Taking it to the Next Level: Advancing Awareness and Equity of Medical Trainees with Invisible Disabilities

Barbara Blacklock, University of Minnesota

Medical trainees with invisible disabilities (psychiatric, attentional and learning) add to the diversity of medical schools across the country. However they face unique barriers. In this interactive session, participants will learn about current research on the primary barriers medical trainees with invisible disabilities face and the potential strategies to remove these barriers.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

Preparing Students for Careers

#7.7 Office for Civil Rights: The Year in Review

Erica Austin, Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education

Howard Kallem, Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education

Two representatives of OCR will present 10-12 important OCR letters and/or resolution agreements issued within the past few years. While the specific topics were not established at “press time,” you can be sure that the presentation will include issues of great interest to all disability service practitioners. While letters issued by OCR regional offices do not represent agency policy, they can be a guide to how the agency approaches issues and be a great resource to you as you manage your program.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

ADA@20 Years

#7.8 Implementing a Social Justice Model: How One University is Making the Transition

Amanda Retsek, University of New Mexico

Joan Green, University of New Mexico

DSS Offices are responsible for ensuring equal access to the university environment. In this presentation, the staff from a DSS office will discuss how they made the transition to a social justice model of working with students with disabilities. They will discuss creating a mission and vision statement, the positive impact on students, working with faculty, and increasing available resources.

Audience: All                                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#7.9 Access College Today: A College Visitation Program for Students with Disabilities

Grady Landrum, Wichita State University

This presentation will look at the pros of developing separate college visitation programs designed specifically for students with disabilities to help in the transition process from high school to a postsecondary educational setting. The purpose, planning, and evaluation of how this has been done at Wichita State University for the past 3 years will be the focus of the presentation.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Transition to College

#7.10 New Student Orientation: A Nuts and Bolts Orientation Model for DSS Departments and Their Students

Mary Barrows, Northeastern University

DSS professionals will learn, hands on, strategies that will enable them to implement a new student orientation program. A brief history will outline the evolution of the present day model, followed by an interactive review of practical materials. This will include everything from invitation letters to a two day agenda. Campus logistics which involve multi-departmental collaboration will be discussed. Finally, a consumable student booklet, complete with PowerPoint presentations for workshops detailing transition to college and strategies for success, will be examined.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Transition to College

#7.11 Teaching Web Accessibility at the Source: in a University Media Design Class

Howard Kramer, University of Colorado-Boulder

Vijay Patel, University of Colorado-Boulder

In order to promote accessible design in the university curriculum, a course on universal and accessible design was developed in the spring of 2009 at the University of Colorado-Boulder. The curriculum for this course examines the standards and methods for designing digital material which are not only accessible for persons with disabilities - a particularly important requirement for the web sites of public entities - but also effective and usable for all users. This session will cover the content of the course, pedagogy used, student response, problems encountered and associated solutions.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

Assistive Technology

#7.12 The Way I Learn: Self-Awareness in Successful University Students with Learning Disabilities

Tabetha Bernstein-Danis, University of Pittsburgh

This study focuses on the self-awareness, personal learning strategies, and support systems that have enabled students with learning disabilities or ADHD to achieve academic success. The findings suggest that a deep understanding of one’s own strengths, needs, and learning style supports student success in the college transition process. Implications indicate the importance developing self-knowledge and personalized learning strategies.

Audience: All                                                                     

Topics in Disability Services: Curriculum and Instruction

#7.13 Remote English Literacy Instruction for Deaf Adults using

Videconferencing Technologies

Kat Burland, LaGuardia Community College

Garrett Zuercher, LaGuardia Community College

Denise Kavin, PEPNet-Northeast

PEPNet Northeast at NTID/RIT and the Program for Deaf Adults at LaGuardia Community College in New York City collaborated on the implementation of distance learning courses focusing on English instruction for Deaf and Hard of Hearing students. The learning needs of Deaf and Hard of Hearing postsecondary students were evaluated using the TABE Reading placement and writing assessment test. The classes were taught by a continuing education teacher at LaGuardia Community College and conducted via video conferencing technologies to remote sites in VT and PA.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

PEPNet

#7.14 Using the NCES Data Analysis System (DAS) to Answer Questions Posed by Constituents

Gerard Walter, PEPNet-Northeast

Dianne Bills, Rochester Institute of Technology

Often DSS personnel are asked questions concerning the national characteristics of disabled postsecondary students. DSS personnel are often at a loss to provide reliable statistics. Yet, a number of national studies include such information. This workshop conducted by an institutional researcher, and professor of Information Technology will demonstrate how to use the NCES Data Analysis System (DAS) to create tabular information about postsecondary disabled students. (Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop to the session)

Audience: All

PEPNet

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Concurrent Block 8

Friday, July 16, 2010  9:00 am - 10:30 am

#8.1 Accessible Equations: Strategies for Alternate Formats with Math and Science

Sean Keegan, Stanford University

Authoring math and science content into alternate formats requires knowledge of math authoring tools, the limitations upon conversion, and the capabilities of the student to use different formats. This hands-on presentation will review different math authoring tools, including MathType and Scientific Notebook, and how these applications may be used to support the creation of math content in alternate formats.

Audience: Intermediate

#8.2 MHSA/Caption Mic

Mark Hall, MHSA/Caption Mic

We represent solutions for creating captions and accessibility for Deaf and Hard of Hearing students. These solutions include: Caption Mic, CaptionSync. Caption Mic creates captions for both live events (such as classes), pre-produced media and can be used on-site or from a remote location. CaptionSync produces files for pre-produced media.

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

#8.3 In Touch Graphics/Click & Go Wayfinding Maps

Joe Cioffi, In Touch Graphics

We will present and demonstrate how we produce tactile maps for the blind, and also introduce a fully accessible wayfinding technology for blind travelers, ClickAndGo Wayfinding Maps. This enables a traveler to generate walking directions (Braille or speech) by selecting a travel location (i.e., hotel, university), choosing starting and destination, and clicking “GO.”

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

8.4 Strada Communications, Inc.: Communication Access - Choosing What Works

Chanel Carlascio, Strada Communications, Inc.

Speech-to-Text or Interpreter? PocketTalker or Loop? TypeWell or C.A.R.T? Not sure which product, service or accommodation, will work in YOUR situation? Come for a quick review of currently available services, products and accommodation options. Speaker will cover topics such as: using speech-to-text services to provide communication access for students experiencing a broad spectrum of disabilities (not just hearing loss), 5 Myths about Meaning-for-Meaning services, pros/cons of  meaning-for-meaning vs. verbatim services and how to choose an accommodation that works. An audience lead discussion to follow lecture.

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

#8.5 A Degree of Success: Graduate Business School for People with Disabilities

Kendra Johnson & Sacha Thompson, GMAC

Charles Schwab didn’t let dyslexia stop him from getting an MBA at Stanford University and founding the brokerage house that bears his name. Paul Orfalea credits his dyslexia and ADHD with contributing to his success founding Kinko’s and teaching entrepreneurship at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business. There’s even a school of thought that says those with ADHD have so much passion and creativity that they’re natural entrepreneurs. Join our session and discover the upcoming and existing products, tools, and services that the Graduate Management Admission Council makes available to promote graduate management education to students with disabilities.

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

#8.6 Improved Listening

Ralph Regula, Improved Listening Systems, Inc.

Our goal at Improved Listening is to help people hear. We assist persons who require hearing assistance by offering the technology to listen critically in a meeting environment, (meeting rooms, classrooms, courtrooms, etc). Listen clearly to the speaker, instead of surrounding conversations. You have the right to hear.

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

#8.7 Plextalk: Realization of Direct Manipulation for Visually Impaired on Touch Panel Interface

TBD, Plextalk, Inc.

In this presentation, we report the real benefit of direct manipulation of touch panel for the visually impaired by typical finger gestures and taps. Along with implementation of DAISY digital talking book navigation, by up/down and left/right finger flick operation.

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

#8.8 Heyward, Lawton and Associates

Salome Heyward, JD

Come join Salome Heyward as she provides a preview of her upcoming Best Practices series. She will explain why colleges and universities must adopt a new approach to addressing the needs of people with psychiatric disabilities and will highlight the significant amendments to the ADA and FERPA. She will also demonstrate her new, comprehensive web-based resource, entitled Disability Direct Response. This subscription based website provides access to Salome’s 30-plus years of compliance expertise in the form of case reviews and assessments; best practices; decision support tools; analysis of agency rulings and court decisions; and research documents.

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

#8.9 Captioning Beyond Compliance: Improving the Quality of your Media

Kevin Erler, Automatic Sync Technologies, LLC

This session discusses the value of captioning beyond regulatory compliance for improved learning, and shows options for captioning. With the rapid deployment of new media types and the increasing ease of publishing multimedia content, the scope of the captioning problem in education is growing at an exponential rate. The need for understanding how to provide quick, useful, and compliant captioning without creating undue workflow or budget burdens has never been more important.

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

#8.10 Help Students Transition to Higher Education with Read&Write GOLD: A Paneled Presentation

Greg Sullivan, Metropolitan College of Denver Access Center

Selim Ozi, Director, Instructional Technology, Metropolitan College of Denver Access Center

Cath-Stager Kilcommons, Coordinator AT, University of Colorado Boulder

Jeanne O'Conner, Disabilities Support Coordinator, Middlesex Community College

Mo Doherty, Regional Sales Director, Texthelp Systems

Learn from a panel of presenters how the support tools in Texthelp’s Read&Write GOLD help students achieve success when transitioning to higher education. Hear first-hand examples of how the software has been integrated into each school’s unique consultation and training programs to solve the many challenges associated with providing all students the support they need. With its many advanced features, Read&Write GOLD is essential to learning in the college setting.

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

#8.11 Introducing ZoomText 10

Doug Hacker, AI Squared

Ai Squared will demonstrate ZoomText 10, the newest version of their popular Screen Magnifier / Reader software for the visually impaired. We’ll focus on the design principles behind this release – ease of use, performance enhancements, compatibility and reliability. Of special interest to AHEAD participants will be our new user interface and the enhanced licensing models that will alleviate concerns for deployment and installation in educational institutions.

Audience: All                     

Exhibitor sponsored session

FEATURED PEPNet PANEL

#8.12 Students’ Perspectives... Students’ Successes

A panel discussion moderated by:

Wendy Harbour, Ph.D. Syracuse University

DS staff get caught up in the day to day work of resource management and problem solving. There seem to be few opportunities to take a breather and listen to the student experience. As students transition from secondary to postsecondary education, and from postsecondary education to employment, numerous factors may have contributed to their success. This session will feature a panel of current and former students who are deaf and hard of hearing who will share their perspectives of what “success” is as well as experiences that contributed to their success.

Audience: All     

PEPNet

#8.13 Social Networks: An introduction to Social Networking and your Accessible Web Presence.

Patrick Smith, PEPNet-Northeast

Social Networks: Facebook, NING, Second Life, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc. familiar names that hold little or no meaning to you? Is your organization planning to use social networking to provide services to your Deaf and Hard of Hearing stakeholders? This presentation will give you a better understanding, some tips and warnings as you enter into the world of social networking.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

PEPNet

#8.14 Tracking, Analyzing and Projecting Interpreting and Real-Time Captioning Expenses

Jennie Bourgeois, PEPNet, Louisiana State University

Benjamin Cornwell, Louisiana State University

Determining how much to budget for accommodations such as interpreting and real-time captioning services is always a challenge for disability service providers. Without knowing the potential variable costs, estimating and projecting for these budgetary needs can be problematic throughout the fiscal year as well. This session will provide ideas, solutions and suggestions for tracking and projecting for these expenses annually.

Audience: Intermediate                                                                                

PEPNet

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Concurrent Block 9

Friday, July 16, 2010  2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

#9.1 Creating Accessible PDF Documents with MS Word and Acrobat Pro

Jayme Johnson, High Tech Center Training Unit, California Community Colleges

While it is generally easy to make an accessible PDF document, many people have never been taught the basic aspects of creating accessible information and therefore have little understanding of what needs to be done, much less how to go about doing it. This session will introduce you to the use of common “workhorses” MS Word and Acrobat Pro, and best practices for creating accessible electronic information with a minimum amount of stress or confusion.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

AT Hands-On Lab

#9.2 OCR & You: Gaining Confidence through Collaboration

Stacey Reycraft, The University of Mississippi

Katie C. Johnson, The University of Mississippi

Geared specifically to new disability service providers, this session is designed to explore how postsecondary institutions interact with OCR and why that interaction is so critical. Through lecture, discussion and real-life scenarios, we will take away the mystery of OCR by exploring perceptions, experiences and what service providers need to know about OCR’s expectations. Presented by experienced DSS professionals for new DSS professionals, attendees will gain increased confidence in their decision-making skills.

Audience: Novice                                                                                                            

New and Newer DS

#9.3 Appreciative Inquiry and Universal Design: Bringing Your Campus Along On The Journey

Sharon Downs, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Appreciative Inquiry (AI) turns the traditional “problem solving” model upside-down. AI enables individuals and organizations to look at their goals and missions through new eyes. Participants will be shown the AI concepts, as well as specific examples of how AI, Social Model of Disability and Universal Design complement each other, and can help create meaningful change on their campuses.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Diverse Viewpoints

#9.4 Symposium: Understanding and Supporting the Unique Needs of Students on the Autism Spectrum: Individual, Group and Family Perspectives

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure: Addressing the Unique Needs of Students with Asperger’s Disorder

Lisa Meeks, John Carroll University

Tracy Masterson, John Carroll University

Universities are struggling to identify accommodations for their Asperger’s population. They spend a considerable amount of time ‘putting out fires’ and reacting to situations rather than being proactive. This program addresses grey areas between typical accommodations and those needed for Asperger’s students while addressing the most common issues disability providers encounter and thoughtful, pro-active solutions for working with Asperger’s students.

Using StrengthsquestTM with Students on the Autism Spectrum

Garret Westlake, Arizona State University

Accommodating increasing numbers of students on the Autism Spectrum (AS) is a growing challenge at the postsecondary level. Learn to lead an AS group using StrengthsquestTM and a curriculum that maximizes resources, empowers students, and builds community.

Supporting the Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder in College: A Parent’s Perspective

Ann Palmer, Autism Society of North Carolina

An increasing number of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder are attending college. Preparing the student for transitioning to college and the importance of self-advocacy will be discussed. The presenter, an author and professional in the field of autism and parent of a college graduate with autism, will provide a realistic view of the parent’s perspective and ways parents can support DSS providers.

Audience: All                                                                                                             

Emerging Student Populations

#9.5 Universal Yoga: Welcoming, Comfortable and Safe Instruction and Practice for All Students

Susan Mann Dolce, University at Buffalo

Randy Borst, University at Buffalo

Designed and taught for full participation by all students, Universal Yoga is based on Universal Design and the WHO’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. We will describe and discuss the theoretical basis, development, implementation and outcomes of the 2008-2009 program at the University at Buffalo as well as the essential features for replicating the program at your institution.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Innovations and Outcomes

#9.6 Disability as Diversity in Employment: Hear from a Panel of Employers

Alan Muir, Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities

COSD partners with more than 400 major national employers and they all understand the importance of diversity in their recruitment and hiring practices. Up to three employers, with a specific focus on disability as a major part of their diversity recruitment, hiring and retention plans, will be discussing their initiatives to recruit college students and recent graduates with disabilities.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Preparing Students for Careers

#9.7 Demystifying the ADAAA, ADAAG, and Other New Laws and Regulations

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

L. Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

Jo Anne Simon, Attorney At Law

Paul Grossman, Hastings College of Law

(Throughout this conference, Mr. Grossman is participating in his private capacity. The views expressed in his presentations will be the result of his independent research and do not necessarily represent the views of the US Department of Education or government.)

It’s an active time in the disability legal realm: the ADA Amendments Act is firmly in place, providing inclusive protection to people with disabilities as intended. The EEOC and DOJ have proposed, but not finalized, regulations under the ADAAA and the ADA. At the same time it’s a little confusing for Disability Resource/Service professionals. Has the definition of “disability” changed? Are there new ADAAG regulations? How does the HEOA come into play? And what’s happening with Section 504? Our panel will clarify the terms and agencies involved and discuss the real and potential impact of the laws on the college campus environment.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

ADA@20 Years

#9.8 Symposium: Wounded Warriors and Disability Services:

Preparedness and Models of Leadership

Statewide Educational Initiatives for Veterans with Disabilities: How AHEAD Can Lead

Lee Henson, University of Missouri

Barbara Hammer, University of Missouri

Tabitha Haynes, Missouri State University

Dan Sewell, Mizzou Student Veterans’ Association

This presentation will review statewide efforts regarding access to postsecondary opportunities for American veterans, efforts that specifically include veterans with disabilities, how in some states AHEAD provides leadership in these activities, and why such leadership is valuable. The presentation will include extensive handouts about model approaches, along with supporting data. Ample time will be provided for comments, questions, experience-sharing, etc.

Wounded Warrior Research: One Year Later

Mary Lee Vance, University of Wisconsin – Superior

Wayne Miller, University of Connecticut

In Fall 2009, Vance and Miller surveyed the AHEAD membership and affiliates to learn how prepared disability services professionals felt they are to serve wounded warriors. The study revealed that the majority of those surveyed felt underprepared. During Spring 2010 the researchers again tried to ascertain, a year later, the level of preparedness of the professionals. This presentation will share results and insights from both studies.

Audience: All                                                                                                             

Emerging Student Populations

#9.9 Providing an Accessible Health Sciences Program for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities

John A. Hosterman, Association of American Medical Colleges

Betty Reiter, University of Calgary

Marcia Kolvitz, PEPNet-South

DS staff are usually called upon to help create an accessible program of instruction for students with disabilities (e.g., LD, AD/HD, psychiatric, musculoskeletal, chronic health, visual, hearing) who are enrolled in health sciences programs. DS practitioners and psychologists will discuss access, support, and accommodative services appropriate for students specifically enrolled in health sciences programs, including classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#9.10 Mining Learning Disability Documentation for Clues in Determining Eligibility for Specific Accommodations

Manjushri Banerjee, University of Connecticut

Loring Brinckerhoff, Educational Testing Service

Participants will learn how to look for markers within disability documentation in making eligibility decisions regarding accommodations such as, 1) foreign language course substitutions; 2) note-taker services; 3) reduced course load, and 4) alternative media. Participants will learn ways to elicit targeted information from a potpourri of disability documents using a new Documentation Decision Making Model.

Audience: Advanced                                      

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#9.11 Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities Transitioning to College

Janet Peters, Great Lakes ADA Center

Ron Stewart, Altformat Solutions LLC

Russ Holland, Adirondack AccessAbility, Inc.

Bryan Ayres, Technology and Curriculum Access Center

Students with disabilities who are transitioning to college with assistive technology needs will be more successful by understanding their strengths, needs, and by having strong self-advocacy and technology literacy skills. Resources are available through the collaboration called Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology-Post Secondary www.qiat-ps.org to assist students and colleges in providing a satisfying post-secondary environment and curriculum.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

Transition to College

#9.12 Executive Function Impairments in High IQ Post-Secondary

Students with ADHD/LD

Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D., Yale University School of Medicine

This presentation will describe how executive functions are related to impairments of ADHD and specific learning disorders, even in high-IQ students. Practical examples will be provided to show how these impairments appear in postsecondary students, often accompanied by other learning disorders and problems with emotional and social functioning. Implications for assessment and intervention for complicated cases of ADHD will be described.

Audience: All                                                     

Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#9.13 Test Equity: The Challenges and Issues

Ginny Chiaverina, PEPNet-Midwest, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Mary Morrison, PEPNet-West, University of Montana

PEPNet convened a 2008 Test Equity Summit in response to widespread requests from stakeholders for information addressing test equity issues. Summit participants examined the challenges and problems academic and psychoeducational tests pose for individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. This presentation will identify test equity issues, explore the Summit’s recommendations and provide newly developed PEPNet resources.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

#9.14 Putting It Together: Accommodations for the Student with Deafblindness

Larry Rhodes, PEPNet-West at COPD-AZ

Timothy Chevalier, PEPNet-West at University of Colorado

This session provides an overview of how to identify and provide appropriate supports for students who have both visual and auditory impairments. The session will also share resources that DSS personnel can access for additional support when providing services to this low incidence student population.

Audience: All                                                                                                     

PEPNet

PLEASE REMEMBER:

All conference registrants must pre-select (and register for) the concurrent sessions they will attend to assure appropriate physical arrangements are made for everyone’s comfort and benefit.