Concurrent Sessions

As you select your concurrent session choices, please note several vendor-sponsored sessions during Concurrent Block 6 on Friday Morning. These sessions are provided to give attendees additional information about some products and services. AHEAD does not expressly endorse any particular commercial entity.

Concurrent Block 1| Concurrent Block 2 | Concurrent Block 3

Concurrent Block 4| Concurrent Block 5 | Concurrent Block 6

Concurrent Block 7 | Concurrent Block 8 | Concurrent Block 9

The AHEAD 2011 Conference offers a number of informative concurrent sessions arranged in Topical Tracks. While you may choose any session that you’d like, we offer these themes for those who want to explore particular topics in depth. Words in italics after each description indicate the topical tracks and areas along with the intended audience level. Information below was current to date and may be subject to change.

Pre-selection of sessions you will attend is required. Please review the following session information below or online, choose the one session during each block that you will attend, and indicate those choices on your Conference Registration Form.

Concurrent Block 1

Wednesday July 13, 2011 11:00 am-12:30 pm

#1.1 Accessible Video: Techniques, Tools, Strategies, and Solutions - Session I

(This session is the first of a three part overview of Accessible Video Production)

Jayme Johnson, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

Sean Keegan, Stanford University

Ken Petri, The Ohio State University

Terrill Thompson, DO-IT, University of Washington

Creating accessible video is often viewed as a difficult, hands-on process, requiring specific skills and technologies. By identifying the proper tools and refining video production processes, it is possible to integrate accessibility into media presentations. As video becomes an ever increasing delivery format, it is necessary that institutions are familiar with the appropriate technologies available to address captioning and audio descriptions for their video productions.

Audience: Intermediate

Sustainable Access Through Technology

#1.2 Partnering Diversity & Disability: Understanding an Intersectional Framework Through Case Studies.

Kirsten Behling, Suffolk University

Ruth Warick, University of British Columbia

Kuan Foo, University of British Columbia

Sarah Knitter, University of British Columbia

As our diversity understanding embraces issues related to gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and more, we as practitioners need to have an increased awareness of how these issues inform disability services. Hear how two universities have reframed disability within the diversity lens through case studies and an interactive workshop. Discuss the issues and receive helpful tools for moving forward.

Audience: All

Partnering to Promote Diversity

#1.3 UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities and other International Updates

Judith E. Heumann, U.S. Department of State, Special Advisor, International Disability Rights

David Hutt, Attorney, National Disability Rights Network; Board Member, U.S. International Council on Disabilities

Join Judy Heumann and David Hutt to talk about the United Nations “treaty” on the rights of disabled people around the world. Learn how countries are responding to this historic affirmation of the human rights of people with disabilities, what steps are being taken to promote ratification in the US, and other activism going on across the globe. This session follows the Opening Keynote and will afford an opportunity for dialogue with Judy as well as a chance for more in-depth discussion about the CRPD and international initiatives that focus on people with disabilities.

Audience: All

International Perspectives and Partnerships

#1.4 Advisory Commission on Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM) in Postsecondary Education Update

Gaeir Dietrich, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

Congress established the Advisory Commission on Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM) in Postsecondary Education in 2008 to improve the availability of AIM for postsecondary students with disabilities. This session reports the progress of the commission, provides information on staying apprised of commission activities, and explains how to share your comments and suggestions.

Audience: All

Civil Rights and Disability Legislation: Sustaining our Work

#1.5 Student Records Management Tools: A Hands-On Introduction to Accuracy, Consistency, and Critical Timeliness

David Anderson, The University of Georgia

Sarah Kesler, The University of Georgia

One of the hardest things as a new professional is being able to process what a student is sharing in a face to face meeting, read the documentation provided by the health care provider(s), and then synthesize it into case notes for their ongoing files. New Disability Service Providers will gain effective strategies for keeping accurate and timely documentation for their case loads. Through discussion and examples of strategies participants will learn how to document the data necessary for their student files, and gain confidence in staying abreast of their paperwork requirements while meeting the needs of their students.

Audience: Novice

New and Newer DS Professionals: Sustaining the Mission

#1.6 Comprehensive Services: Assessment and Service Collaboration within the University System of Georgia

Will Lindstrom, Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders

Joe Tedesco, Alternative Media Access Center

Ann Loyd, Macon State College

Challenges faced by postsecondary disability service providers (DSPs) frequently relate to eligibility decisions and efficient access to alternative media. This panel (a psychologist, an assistive technology expert, and an experienced DSP) will describe the innovative partnership between three University System of Georgia agencies that has resulted in a seamless package of comprehensive, cost-effective, and efficient services for students with disabilities. Participants will understand the benefits of a state-wide, collaborative approach to serving postsecondary students with disabilities and how the innovations specifically related to eligibility decisions, accommodation recommendations, and alternative media service delivery could be applied by other disability service providers.

Audience: Intermediate

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#1.7 Understanding Disability Through Improvisation and Artistic Expression

Patricia Fennell, Albany Health Management Associates, Inc

Lynn Royster, DePaul University

The arts, whether through writing, music, painting, movement, humor or other means, can help students with disability develop acceptance and meaning for their lives and supports their academic, social and career success. Presenters will describe how the five capacities of improvisation -- 1) tolerate ambiguity, 2) take risks, 3) become curious, 4) improvise, and 5) innovate -- helps students find success and creates greater sensitivity and creativity among faculty and administrators.

Audience: All

Partnering with Disability Studies

#1.8 Services for Students on the Autism Spectrum: Program Development and Enhancement

Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut School of Law

Christine Wenzel, University of Connecticut

Lisa Meeks, John Carroll University

Lisa King, St Catherine's University

Programs for college students with Autism Spectrum Disorders continue to develop as the population of students with this diagnoses increases. This session will present college programs from across the country, how to assist students on the spectrum on your campus and/or how to start a program.  The information is not exclusive to those campuses looking to start programs but will be useful to all service providers.

Audience: All

#1.9 Universal Design in Student Affairs: Engagement & Retention

Melanie Thompson, Northern Illinois University

Angela Branson, Northern Illinois University

The principles of Universal Design (UD) will be discussed and demonstrated through examples of the Social Justice model of disability. Participants will have the opportunity to analyze examples of the use of UD across Student Affairs entities and discuss how UD can be applied beyond the compliance component of disabilities to positively impact engagement and retention of multiple students.

Audience: Intermediate

Partnering to Implement Universal Design Across Campus

#1.10 You Are Not Alone! Strengthening Effectiveness through Collaboration

Bridget McNamee, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Paul Hastings, Wheelock College

Timothy Rogers, Simmons College

Susan Mayo, Emmanuel College

Judy Moss, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Are you an office of one or two? Are you interested in sharing ideas, forming working relationships, and troubleshooting with others? A panel of professionals, representing colleges who have a consortial relationship, will present a framework to help you build a collaborative group of colleagues who provide support to students with disabilities. The presentation will guide participants through the process and facilitate the creation of a starter kit for establishing effective partnerships.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#1.11 Digital Smartpens: Enhancing Success by Integrating Technology, Fostering Community and Academic Achievement

Jill Roter, Lehman College

Nicole Dory, College of Staten Island

Maryellen Smolka, College of Staten Island

Integrating technology into student support programming with digital pens through a comprehensive training model can provide sustainable, cost-effective solutions for accessibility issues for students with disabilities, congruent with universal design models. Participants will use digital pens, learn how they work and what makes for successful program implementation, and discover potential for positively impacting disability services, student empowerment, and student learning.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Technology

#1.12 Inciting Resources, Partnerships and Access for a Sustainable Future

Scott Hatley, Incight

Keith Ozols, Incight

Incight will share a model being developed in Oregon focused on increasing partnerships between high schools, colleges and nonprofits to help DS staff expand access and resources for students with disabilities. The presenters will lead a hands-on interactive presentation utilizing online tools and hardcopy resource guidebooks/lessons that address access to higher education, retention and universal design on campus.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

Concurrent Block 2

Wednesday July 13, 2011 4:00 pm-5:30 pm

#2.1 Authoring Math Content for the Web and DAISY

Sean Keegan, Stanford University

Ron Stewart, Chair AHEAD Instructional Materials Accessibility Group

While it is possible to create and present mathematical expressions in digital formats, there are few methods for ensuring the accessibility of science, technology, and math (STEM) content for students using assistive computer technologies. One method is to create mathematical expressions using an equation editor tool and then convert equations into graphics to be placed on the Web page. This requires the addition of alternate text that “linearizes” the equation and poses a risk of miscommunication to individuals using assistive computer technology attempting to “listen” to the equation. A second method involves the use of specific math authoring tools (e.g., MathType and MathDAISY, Scientific Notebook, etc.), specific Web browser plug-ins, and the use of assistive computer technologies and DAISY applications that support MathML-based formats. Implemented properly, the utilization of math authoring tools in conjunction with specific technologies can support a student’s access to STEM materials via the Web and other e-text formats.

Audience: Intermediate

Sustainable Access through Technology

#2.2 Diversity Audit Tools: Assessing Disability within Diversity in Higher Education

Melanie Thompson, Northern Illinois University, Moderator

Disability resource professionals are challenged to infuse disability into diversity initiatives. One way to accomplish this is through diversity audit tools. AHEAD Diversity Initiative leaders will review diversity audit tools, discuss strengths and challenges of each tool, disseminate results regarding the administration of one audit tool, and facilitate dialogue regarding ally/bridge building to promote diversity with disability.

Audience: Advanced

Partnering to Promote Diversity

#2.3 Promoting an Accessible Postsecondary Environment in Canadian Schools of Social Work

Irene Carter, University of Windsor

Roy Hanes, Carleton University

Judy MacDonald, Dalhousie University

Research conducted by the Persons with Disabilities Caucus of CASWE indicated most schools offer disability courses and disability-related placements, and, are making substantive advances with respect to disability access and inclusion. However, disability awareness is still needed in pedagogy, curriculum, and student services; along with active involvement in program development, including professional standards. Attendees will gain knowledge about the current state of accessibility and disability in postsecondary Canadian schools of social work, learn about recent research about courses, programs, field experiences, scholarly activities, equity policies, the numbers of students, and student and faculty involvement in issues about disability, and determine areas needing further research regarding disability and postsecondary education in Canada and elsewhere.

Audience: All

International Perspectives and Partnerships

#2.4 Disability Services: Gate Keeper or Door Opener

William Pollard, University of Massachusetts Boston

Gladys Loewen, Consultant

Many attitudes, policies and practices in Disability Service Offices and higher education in general give an illusion of inclusion and equitable participation for disabled students while actually maintaining a form of discrimination. This interactive session will examine the intersection of disability and DS practices in higher education and the intended and unintended outcomes of that juncture. The focus will be on strategies that create higher education communities who value social justice, the disability experience and universally designed environments. Participants will be able to identify the role that their policies, procedures and practices have on the campus response to disability and impact on social justice and maintaining discrimination.

Audience: All

Civil Rights and Disability Legislation: Sustaining our Work

#2.5 Web Accessibility 101

Terrill Thompson, University of Washington

This session is designed to help participants attain a basic understanding of web accessibility principles. Participants won’t become web accessibility experts, but they will be able to collaborate with web developers on their campuses with fresh new understanding of how certain web features can cause problems for students with disabilities, and how those features can be designed better.

Audience: Novice

Sustainable Access through Technology

#2.6 Documentation Gone Green: Operating the DS Office with Nominal Need for Documentation

Adam Meyer, Eastern Michigan University

The current DS paradigm revolves heavily around the concept that documentation is required for students to access disability services. This presentation will review one college’s two year journey from operating under the “must submit documentation for accommodation services” model to operating under the notion that quality campus services can most often be provided with minimal to no third party documentation. Participants will be provided with an “outside-the-box” way of thinking with regarding to documentation. The presenter will provide points of consideration for participants to take home should they want to contemplate and explore whether or not such a shift could happen within their DS office.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

#2.7 “voicesoftheadageneration” project

Susan Mann Dolce, University at Buffalo

Randy Borst, University at Buffalo

Mike Rembis, University at Buffalo

This concurrent session, valuable for all Conference attendees, highlights the “voicesoftheadageneration,” a program demonstrating strategies for disability service professionals and disability studies faculty working directly with students telling their stories as the first “ADA generation.” Using videos, examples of student essays, and group discussion we will explore program planning, marketing, events and outcomes. Attendees will learn the essential elements in collaborative, student based programming and explore students with disabilities’ stories about their experiences as members of the “ADA” generation.

Audience: All

Partnering with Disability Studies

#2.8 The Essential Six: Helping Parents Support Their College Students with LDs

Lorri LaMagdelaine, Westfield State University

Michaelene Cronin, Landmark College

How can DS providers assist parents on the journey of supporting their college students as emergent adults? The Essential Six are central areas for parents to continually revisit with their college student that empower self-advocacy skills and promote a positive academic self-concept, and guide parents through the dynamic process of transitioning their student to the interdependent relationships of college success. Through an active sharing of experience, discussion, and case study, participants (parents, DS providers, and students) will learn and reflect on the critical role parents of college students with an LD can assume that focuses on the essential six areas that support student interdependence and self-advocacy.

Audience: All

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition

#2.9 Shifting the Paradigm: Agents of Change in the Campus Community

Barbara Hammer, University of Missouri- Columbia

Abbie O’Sullivan, University of Missouri - Columbia

Lee Henson, University of Missouri - Columbia

Take an in-depth look at the work of an un-funded, campus-wide committee and its unique efforts to build support to shift from the medical model of disability toward an inclusive social model. This session will focus on an innovative approach that combines committee members’ collective knowledge and skills to implement organizational change, engaging participants in sharing and discussion.

Audience: All

Partnering to Implement Universal Design Across Campus

#2.10 Sustainable Access: Incorporating Social, Environmental, and Economic Concepts when Serving Student Veterans

Jorja Waybrant, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Sandra Patton, Lone Star College System

Patricia Richter, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania

Merrill Parra, Lehman College CUNY

Brenda York, Montana State University

This roundtable discussion is designed to develop critical thinking skills and to actively involve participants as they increase their awareness, knowledge and an understanding of the fundamental framework for sustainable educational practices. Attendees will learn how to create sustainable partnerships in order to develop, grow, and improve their programs for veterans. Participants are invited to take an active role in this discussion through analytical inquiry and personal input on the delivery of their own services when working with student veterans with disabilities.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#2.11 Technology Accessibility: Transforming our Institutions with New Guidance and New Perspectives

Teresa Haven, Arizona State University

Following recent statements by DOE and DOJ regarding technology accessibility compliance, how can you work with your institution to enact necessary changes? This presentation will provide DS professionals with an overview of recent legal updates, ideas for building alliances, and strategies for engaging key stakeholders in dialogue and helping them learn new perspectives on the need for JUST design. Participants will gain an understanding of technology compliance issues that may impact their organizations presented through social justice perspectives on disability.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Technology

#2.12 Best Practices for Serving Veterans with Disabilities in Postsecondary Settings

Alfred Souma, Seattle Central Community College

Scott Bellman, University of Washington-DO-IT Project

Participants will learn about best practices for serving returning veterans with disabilities in postsecondary settings. Examples of faculty and staff training will be shared, as well as handouts that describe issues unique to serving veterans with disabilities. The session will also include information about specific disabilities common during battle, such as post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Time will be allotted for questions during the presentation.

Audience: All

Topics in DS: Student Veterans

Concurrent Block 3

Thursday July 14, 2011 11:00 am-12:30 pm

#3.1 Accessible Video: Techniques, Tools, Strategies, and Solutions - Session II

Jayme Johnson, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

Sean Keegan, Stanford University

Ken Petri Program Director, The Ohio State University

Terrill Thompson, DO-IT, University of Washington

This session is the second of a three part overview of Accessible Video Production. It is the presenters’ expectation that attendees will have participated in session one of this three part series. Creating accessible video is often viewed as a difficult, hands-on process, requiring specific skills and technologies. By identifying the proper tools and refining video production processes, it is possible to integrate accessibility into media presentations. As video becomes an ever increasing delivery format, it is necessary that institutions are familiar with the appropriate technologies available to address captioning and audio descriptions for their video productions.

Audience: Intermediate

Sustainable Access through Technology

#3.2 Courageous Conversations

Sue Kroeger, University of Arizona

Melanie Thornton, University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Alberto Guzman, University of Arizona

Kevin Johnson, Berklee College of Music

Too often diversity panel discussions do not go beyond educating participants to be more “politically correct”. This conversation promises to take us to the next level. Panelists will answer some of the difficult questions about the dynamics that maintain the status quo in our journey toward social justice and will discuss how diverse groups can work together for change.

Audience: All

Partnering to Promote Diversity

#3.3 Lessons Learned on Students with Disabilities Accessing Study Abroad

Michele Scheib, Mobility International USA

Barbara Hammer, University of Missouri

Polly Livingston, Portland State University

Compelling stories of collaborating with study abroad staff and students will be shared by disability services directors and a professional from a national organization to highlight critical issues of when and how to disclose information about a disability, how to address obstacles if they arise, and what successful strategies can be used for greater access and inclusion in study abroad.

Audience: All

International Perspectives and Partnerships

#3.4 DOJ’s 2010 Regulations: What You Need to Know and How to Prepare, Part I – Dogs and Horses and Segways – Oh, My! Who “gets in” under Federal Law?

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

James Bostrom, US Department of Justice

Scott Lissner, ADA Coordinator’s Off., The Ohio State University

John Catlin, LCM Architects, LLC

In 2010 the Department of Justice issued the first major changes to its 1991 regulations under the ADA, with compliance deadlines of March 2011 and March 2012. This series of three back-to-back sessions explores key issues for higher education -- service animals and mobility devices, effective communication, and approaches to compliance -- from a variety of perspectives. Gain an understanding of the impact of DOJ’s 2010 rules on higher education, learn how to develop policies for particularly thorny issues, and gain practical tools for planning for compliance.

Audience: All

Civil Rights and Disability Legislation: Sustaining our Work

#3.5 Explore Different Delivery Systems: Copy of Classroom Notes

Britt Neff, University of Washington

Susan McPhee, Pierce College, Fort Steilacoom

Ivey West, University of Puget Sound

DSS offices range from one staff member to a team of staff. The procedure for recruiting, hiring and maintaining note-takers has an impact on time and energy for every office as well as our students receiving timely academic adjustments. In addition current economic trends may find you with less dollars and a heavier workload. Join a roundtable discussion where three different models of delivery will be presented. We will discuss the impact of the note taking process on staff and students and lessons learned, such as recourses taken when systems break down. Participants are encouraged to join the discussion to review and apply practical applications into their classroom notes procedure.

Audience: All

New and Newer DS Professionals: Sustaining the Mission

#3.6 Leadership Lessons Learned in Building and Sustaining Momentum for Change

Melanie Thompson, Northern Illinois University,

Adam Meyer, Eastern Michigan University

Creating sustainable access for students with disabilities takes more than management of resources; it takes leadership, commitment, energy and motivation. The presenters will share lessons learned through transitioning from administrators to leaders, including discoveries during moves to new institutions. Big and small steps can be taken to position disability offices in such a way that noticeable campus change is possible.

Audience: Advanced

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

#3.7 What Students with Hidden Disabilities Say About Disclosure at Postsecondary Academic Settings

Julie Alexandrin, University of Southern Maine

Monica Chenard, University of Southern Maine

This session describes the results of a study that examined the disclosure and nondisclosure of students with hidden disabilities at postsecondary institutions; if they do not disclose, why; the experiences of students when they disclose or do not disclose their disabilities; and what is necessary to create environments which are welcoming and supportive for students with hidden disabilities.

Audience: All

Partnering with Disability Studies

#3.8 Dynamics of Disability Identity Within the Student Veteran Community

Amanda Kraus, University of Arizona

Nick Rattray, University of Arizona

Dan Standage, University of Arizona

Using data from University of Arizona’s Disabled Veterans Reintegration and Education Project, this presentation will discuss concepts that shape how veterans think about disability, share preliminary findings on veteran identity, and consider implications for practice within higher education and disability services. We explore how issues of identity affect student veterans as they integrate into institutions of higher education.

Audience: All

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition

#3.9 From Marginalization to Prominence: Exploring One University’s Successes with Disability and Design

Chris Lanterman, Northern Arizona University

Jamie Axelrod, Northern Arizona University

David Camacho, Northern Arizona University

The importance of building inclusive and universally-designed postsecondary environments has been at the forefront of discussions, literature, and Conference presentations for a decade. This session will highlight how Northern Arizona University has moved disability and inclusive/universal design from places of marginalization to places of prominence within the curriculum, culture, and policies of the institution. Participants will engage with panel discussants to explore the factors that have created these opportunities. By the end of the session, participants will: 1) brainstorm solutions to one “show stopper” on their campus, 2) identify key allies across campus, and 3) identify 3 “simple and intuitive” starting points for replicating NAU’s progress.

Audience: All

Partnering to Implement Universal Design Across Campus

#3.10 Creating and Sustaining a Campus-wide Approach to Student Mental Health

Barbara Blacklock, University of Minnesota

Betty Benson, University of Minnesota

Students with mental health conditions have been entering colleges and universities in documented and unprecedented numbers. This session will focus on the benefits to disability services providers of actively leading a campus-wide response to student mental health, through the development of a campus-wide committee. In-session working time will be provided to begin to develop a plan for your campus. Participants will understand the role of the Disability Services office in promoting a campus-wide initiative related to student mental health and the benefits to the campus.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#3.11 Networking and Integrating Assistive Technology in the University/College Environment

Dan Comden, University of Washington

Networked delivery of access technology (screen reading, magnification, text-to-speech) at a large university will be described and discussed, including a description of tools and techniques used, problems encountered, and future plans. Participants will gain knowledge of tools used to create and deploy AT throughout and across facilities in a distributed domain environment.

Audience: Intermediate

Sustainable Access through Technology

#3.12 The Impact of Campus Climate and Disabilities Assessment on Institutional Change

Susan Vogel, Campus Climate and Disabilities, LLC

Kathy Loder-Murphy, Rutgers University

Susan Mann Dolce, University at Buffalo

Gregory A. Moorehead, Rutgers University

Participants will gain an understanding of the four Campus Climate and Disabilities Questionnaires. Actual changes that occurred on three campuses 1-10 years after distributing the Questionnaires will be described as well as how they were achieved. The following characteristics of change were identified including narrow vs. far-reaching, single vs. multi-faceted, direct vs. indirect, and rapid vs. slow rate of change. Achieving these campus changes was attributed to a variety of factors including campus leadership, internal and external pressure, identification and dissemination of results, the specific recommendations, available resources, and timing.

Audience: Novice

Research Topics in DS

Concurrent Block 4

Thursday July 14, 2011 2:00 pm-3:00 pm

#4.1 Optimizing Resources for Improved Braille Production – Part I: MS Word, a Braille Template and DBT

Susan Christensen, Braille Production & Software Specialist

Lucia Hasty, Tactile Graphics Production Specialist

These sessions will provide participants with the basic skills in setting up software for optimal braille and tactile graphics production. It is the expectation of the presenters that participants in the second half of the session will have attended the first half.

DBT’s MS Word Braille template provides an efficient method to prepare doc/docx files for braille production. This hands-on overview will highlight the essentials for using the template.

Audience: Intermediate

Sustainable Access through Technology

#4.2 Simulations No More! Ways to Incorporate Disability into a Diverse University Experience

Alberto Guzman, University of Arizona

Cheryl Muller, University of Arizona

How often do we hear of proposals for such things as “disability simulation evenings” in student residence halls? Would they imagine doing an “African American simulation evening”? Of course not! Instead disability awareness should be reframed throughout the university as part of an integrated diversity program. The purpose of this session will be to provide strategies for implementing such integration. The audience will learn that disability awareness should be reframed throughout the university as part of an integrated diversity program. The purpose of this session will be to provide strategies for implementing such integration.

Audience: Novice

Partnering to Promote Diversity

#4.3 Developing Grass-root Support for Access: Higher Education and Disabilities in Nigeria

Ruth Aderanti, Babcock University, Nigeria

Mary Oluyemisi Aina, Federal College of Education

Olufunke J. Ogunsanmi, University of Ado Ekiti

There have been attempts to liaise with some higher institution lecturers, inquiring from them how students with learning disabilities are being taken care of but it has been discovered that nothing much has been done in this area by various organs involved in the provision of educational facilities. Most of the institutions if not all do not have learning disability centers. This presentation provides quantitative evidences of disabilities in Nigeria higher institutions and strategies for developing grass-root support for access will be discussed.

Audience: All

International Perspectives and Partnerships

#4.4 DOJ’s 2010 Regulations: What You Need to Know and How to Prepare, Part II – Effective Communication and the ADA: interpreters, companions, VRI, TRS, and the Web

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

James Bostrom, US Department of Justice

Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

John Catlin, LCM Architects, LLC

In 2010 the Department of Justice issued the first major changes to its 1991 regulations under the ADA, with compliance deadlines of March 2011 and March 2012. This three-part series of sessions explores key issues for higher education -- service animals and mobility devices, effective communication, and approaches to compliance -- from a variety of perspectives. Attendees will gain an understanding of the impact of DOJ’s 2010 rules on higher education, learn how to develop policies for particularly thorny issues, and gain practical tools for planning for compliance.

Audience: All

Civil Rights and Disability Legislation: Sustaining our Work

#4.5 Transition Jeopardy™: Insight into Postsecondary Transition for New/Newer DS Professionals

Deanna Arbuckle, University of Dayton

Brenda Cooper, University of Dayton

Transition Jeopardy™ will provide attendees with answers to some questions about transition to postsecondary education. We will include answers and questions on the following: importance of documentation of disability, potential post-secondary accommodations, post-secondary assistive technology, and post-secondary processes and how they may differ from the high school.

Participants will have an understanding of differences in transition from high school to post-secondary educational environments through a review of post-secondary disability determination process, accommodations, supports, legislation, etc.

Audience: All

New and Newer DS Professionals: Sustaining the Mission

#4.6 Expanding Cultural Awareness of Exceptional Learners (EXCEL) in Postsecondary Environments - A Project Update

Christopher Murray, University of Oregon

Hilary Gerdes, University of Oregon

Allison Lombardi, University of Oregon

Franklin Bender, University of Oregon

Project EXCEL-UO, in its second year, promotes organizational supports for postsecondary students with disabilities through a faculty train-the-trainer model. We will describe assessments, materials, and communication mediums developed to track and improve student perceptions of campus climate and faculty progress toward incorporation of inclusive instruction based on universal design principles.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

#4.7 Religiosity among Postsecondary Students with Disabilities: Effects on Disability Acceptance and Self-esteem

Ammon McNeff, Brigham Young University

Michael Brooks, Brigham Young University

Jenny Brooks, Brigham Young University

Religiosity is among the most important aspects of self. However, religiosity and its effect on disability acceptance and self-esteem have not been studied extensively in postsecondary students with disabilities. This session reviews survey data from 97 students indicating the significance of religiosity on self-concept and acceptance of disability. Mediating variables (e.g., students’ self-rated functional impairment) are also examined. Attendees will gain understanding of the effects of religiosity on the self-esteem and acceptance of disability of postsecondary students with disabilities. This understanding will aid disability service providers in their ability to help students understand religiosity as it pertains to their disability as well as other student concerns.

Audience: All

Partnering with Disability Studies

#4.8 New Student Orientation: A Nuts and Bolts Orientation Model for DSS Departments and Their Students

Mary Barrows, Northeastern University

DSS professionals will learn, hands on, strategies that will enable them to implement a new student orientation program. A brief history will outline the evolution of the present day model, followed by an interactive review of practical materials. This will include everything from invitation letters to a two day agenda. Campus logistics which involve multi-departmental collaboration will be discussed. Finally, a consumable student booklet, complete with PowerPoint presentations for workshops detailing transition to college and strategies for success, will be examined. New to this presentation is the “January” program designed to fit the needs of Northeastern’s January admit students. This admissions initiative poses some challenges to an orientation program and our orientation committee stepped up in a creative way to meet these challenges.

Audience: Intermediate

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition

#4.9 Collaborative Consultation with Faculty to Promote UDL: Supporting Learning Success

Lawrence G. Shelton, University of Vermont

Susan W. Edelman, University of Vermont

Presenters will walk participants through a project developed at a New England university to involve faculty in a collaborative consultation process that helps them apply Universal Design for Learning principles in their courses. In this interactive workshop, participants will develop frameworks for providing similar consultation tailored to their own institutions.

Audience: All

Partnering to Implement Universal Design Across Campus

#4.10 Accommodations in Online Learning: You Can’t Do It Alone. You Shouldn’t Try.

Kelly Hermann, Empire State College

Jane Jarrow, DCCOL

If you think services to students with disabilities are not different for online/blended classes, you are wrong. If you think accommodations in online learning can be handled by diligent attention to technological access, you are wrong. If you think you are underprepared and overwhelmed by the thought of supporting online learners, you may be right! But we’ve got a plan! Participants will gain a better understanding of how online learning contexts pose new challenges for both learners and service providers, and be provided a framework for examining their existing policies, procedures, and practices to determine what, if any, changes are needed. All will receive a “to do” list of practical actions to take on return to their own campuses.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#4.11 Engaging Unheard Voices: Two New Technologies for Including Deaf/blind Students in Technologically-mediated Instruction

Valerie Haven, University of Massachusetts

This presentation will showcase two technology toolkit suites designed to include deaf/blind learners in technologically-mediated instruction and distance education.

Remote captioning for students who are both deaf and blind is problematic because of the technical limitations of the use of stream text in synchronous conferencing and remote video captioning.

Two toolkit suites developed at the University of Massachusetts will be discussed and demonstrated. The software used to create the toolkits will be showcased along with discussion of the support issues. Teaching strategies that compliment the toolkits will also be presented.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Technology

#4.12 Determining Commonly Requested Accommodations: Applying Best Practices to Complex Cases for Decision-Making

Manju Banerjee, University of Connecticut

Loring Brinckerhoff, Educational Testing Service

This session is for veterans in the field who routinely review disability documentation to determine eligibility for accommodations. The presenters will discuss complex cases involving three commonly requested accommodations: extra time, note-takers, and alternate media. The session will include a step-by-step best practices guide to accommodation decision making including use of student intake data and non-traditional approaches to accommodation determination.

Audience: Advanced

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

Concurrent Block 5

Thursday July 14, 2011 4:30 pm-5:30 pm

#5.1 Optimizing Resources for Improved Braille Production – Part II: Graphics Embossers and Software

Susan Christensen, Braille Production & Software Specialist

Lucia Hasty, Tactile Graphics Production Specialist

These sessions will provide participants with the basic skills in setting up software for optimal braille and tactile graphics production. It is the expectation of the presenters that participants in the second half of the session will have attended the first half.

Production of tactile graphics is becoming a simpler task than in the past. This hands-on session offers an overview of current and new software and hardware combinations for production of braille graphics. Participants will have the opportunity to create a simple Braille graphic using several software packages and embossers.

Audience: Intermediate

Sustainable Access through Technology

#5.2 Student Diversity within Disability Services Office - Issues and Best Practices in Promoting Diversity

Elda Zeko-Underwood, Quinsigamond Community College

Minority students with disabilities (MSDs) face more challenges in accessing supportive resources that their non-minority peers with disabilities when pursuing secondary education. This presentation will provide comparative data gathered during three consecutive fall semesters at one particular institution of higher education. It will address issues that affect lower disclosure rates by MSDs and provide information about best practices that would promote diversity within Disability Services Office.

Audience: All

Partnering to Promote Diversity

#5.3 Project Access: A Project Investigating Global Disability Access and Culture

Michelle Rigler, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Leslie Harms, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

International travel is vital in our global job market. This experience, however, is not often an opportunity college students with disabilities take advantage of due to the challenge of managing international accommodations. The Office for Students with Disabilities at UTC developed a program to lead international trips each year designed to study global access. These trips will investigate the disability access in various parts of the world with the culminating product being a documentary grading each country on access. Attendees will gain an understanding of the planning process in setting up international accommodations, and hear first hand from students the inherent benefit in planning, participating in, and presenting about international study trips.

Audience: Intermediate

International Perspectives and Partnerships

#5.4 DOJ’s 2010 Regulations: What You Need to Know and How to Prepare, Part III - Are You There Yet? Deadlines and Duties under DOJ’s 2010 ADA Rules

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

James Bostrom, US Department of Justice

Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

John Catlin, LCM Architects, LLC

In 2010 the Department of Justice issued the first major changes to its 1991 regulations under the ADA, with compliance deadlines of March 2011 and March 2012. This series of sessions explores key issues for higher education -- service animals and mobility devices, effective communication, and approaches to compliance -- from a variety of perspectives.

Audience: All

Civil Rights and Disability Legislation: Sustaining our Work

#5.5 Sustaining Our Mission: Training and Developing the Next Generation of DS Professionals

Krysten Donnay, University of Minnesota

Mary Grace Hyland, University of Minnesota

Betty Benson, University of Minnesota

This session will explore how a disability services office used its mission statement to provide a philosophical foundation for hiring, training, and retaining new professionals. In this interactive session, participants will be provided with examples of successful training measures that can help reduce employee turnover and create sustainability. The presenters are an experienced manager and two young professionals new to the field. Participants will leave this session with low-cost, practical strategies for hiring, training, and retaining new professionals.

Audience: All

New and Newer DS Professionals: Sustaining the Mission

#5.6 Promoting Disability and Social Justice: Campus Initiatives that Inspire Social Change

Cynthia Fuller, University of Minnesota

Linda Wolford, University of Minnesota

Kristen Langer, University of Minnesota

The University of Minnesota’s Disability Services uses a social justice framework for viewing disability, including mental health, as an aspect of identity and diversity. Through presentation and facilitated discussion, participants will learn about four social justice initiatives. Presenters will engage participants in discussing experiences on their campuses for promoting disability identity and strategies for engaging students.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

#5.7 Partnering with Faculty to Infuse Disability Studies into the General Curriculum

Kimberly Tanner, Valdosta State University

Katheryne Staeger-Wilson, Missouri State University

The presenters will share their experiences as members of Project ShIFT (Shaping Inclusion through Foundational Transformation) and how these experiences led them to create partnerships with faculty in order to infuse disability studies into the general curriculum. Success of these partnerships, a faculty book series and the development of new courses, has the potential to influence change in campus culture. Attendees will learn how two different campuses that do not have a Disability Studies program implemented faculty development programming to address disability studies.

Audience: All

Partnering with Disability Studies

#5.8 Supporting the Educational Experience of Students with Aspergers Syndrome through Online and Video Conferencing

Lisa King, St. Catherine University/College Autism Spectrum

Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut School of Law

Video conferencing is a tool for teaching and supporting students with autism spectrum disorders. Free programs available on the internet facilitate idea exchanges and conversations across geographical areas. The presenters use Skype and online role-playing modules to monitor academic issues and provide social supports for college students with ASD. The presenters will demonstrate webcam technology through video of student interactions.

Audience: Intermediate

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition

#5.9 Partnering for Success in Colleges/Universities: A Grass Roots Approach to Infusing UDL

Mari Guillermo, San Diego State University

Bobbie J. Atkins, San Diego State University

The potential for Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Principles to take root in colleges/universities begins with faculty and staff. Partnerships with administrators and programs enhance the potential for systemic change. This presentation will showcase examples of UDL applications in postsecondary institutions and share how a mentoring approach is fostering collaboration and transfer of knowledge within the higher education community.

Audience: All

Partnering to Implement Universal Design Across Campus

#5.10 The AccessText Network: Publishers and DSS Collaborating to Improve College Textbook Accessibility

Christopher Lee, The AccessText Network/Georgia Tech, Moderator

The AccessText Network is the pioneering initiative of the Association of American Publishers to bring college textbook publishers together with disabled student services to improve the accessibility of instructional materials for students with print-related disabilities. A panel of publishers and college DSS staff will present their experiences with AccessText in its first full year of operation. Participants will gain insight on the college textbook market in terms of accessibility, and will learn about the services offered by the AccessText Network, and how peers are utilizing the service.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#5.11 Voice to Text - Successes and Challenges - A Fun Exploration

Philip Hyssong, Alternative Communication Services, LLC

Most DSS offices know about voice-to-text services, but the detail in providing quality services is missed. This workshop will focus on successes and failures that have been learned through the use of CART and Text Interpreting services. In many cases the lessons learned, both good and bad, have humorous elements that will be shared in this laugh and learn workshop.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Technology

#5.12 How to Build Collaborative Working Groups to Help with ADAAA Accommodations

Ruben Robles, University of Redlands

Amy Wilms, University of Redlands

Disability Services are often a one or two person department, especially at a small university or college. This presentation will demonstrate how “Collaborative Working Groups” can alleviate pressures that are naturally inherent with Disability Services. Participants will receive a universal training tool, outlines, and examples of how to create working groups on one’s campus.

Audience: Novice

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

Concurrent Block 6

Friday July 15, 2011 9:00 am-10:30 am

#6.1 Academic Considerations for Mobile Platforms

Sean Keegan, Stanford University

Jayme Johnson, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

Smart phones and iPads grow more popular and raise issues of legality, accessibility, and pedagogy. This presentation will review emerging electronic book reader technologies, such as Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android platform, and assess the functionality of these different systems as it pertains to use by students with mobility, learning, and print-based disabilities.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Technology

#6.2 Improved Listening

Ralph Regula, Improved Listening, Inc.

AHEAD has used the Sound Choice SC-186k infrared emitter at their Conference for the last three years, making all of the meeting rooms “hearing friendly”. Our system allows students who require hearing assistance the option of sitting anywhere in the classroom and amplify all spoken material in the classroom. Did you know that hearing impaired instructors can hear all conversation from their students without passing around a microphone? Come see how deaf students can benefit with remote CART that hears all conversations in the room. We will be showing the latest improvements in hearing amplification. Our goal is to include more students in the classroom experience.

Audience: All

Exhibitor Sponsored Session

#6.3 Alternative Communication Services

Phil Hyssong, Alternative Communication Services, LLC

Mike Cano, Alternative Communication Services, LLC

Rick Prickett, Alternative Communication Services, LLC

This workshop will be an informal overview of the services offered by Alternative Communication Services including CART, remote CART, captioning, text interpreting and sign language. In addition, you will be given the secrets as to why we truly are the alternative! The workshop is great for beginners with little to no knowledge as well as for those who feel they have all the answers! Come and get educated on communication solutions for students with hearing loss.

Audience: All

Exhibitor Sponsored Session

#6.4 Making Bookshare Work for Your Students

Cherie Miller, Bookshare

Betsy Burgess, Bookshare

Bookshare’s online digital library is free for qualified students in the US. Postsecondary students find the collection to be an indispensible resource for finding the books they need for schoolwork and for pleasure reading. Find out what’s new at Bookshare. Your students will benefit!

Audience: All

Exhibitor Sponsored Session

#6.5 Help Students Transition to Higher Education with Read&Write GOLD: A Paneled Presentation

Holly Johnson, Auxiliary Aids and Services Coordinator, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Mo Doherty, Regional Sales Director, Texthelp Systems, Inc.

Michael Heuer, Technology Solutions Manager, Portland Community College

Learn from a panel of presenters how the reading, writing, studying, and research support tools in Texthelp’s Read&Write GOLD can help students achieve success in higher education. Hear educators representing a range of higher education institutions, including a small college, a community college, and a large university, discuss how the software has been integrated into their school’s unique programs to solve the many challenges associated with providing students with suitable accommodations. With an easy-to-use, customizable toolbar that integrates with mainstream applications (e.g., Word, Internet Explorer, Adobe), Read&Write GOLD can be used by all students, on campus and off.

Audience: All

Exhibitor Sponsored Session

#6.6 New Solutions from Dolphin Computer Access

Charlie Hamilton, Dolphin Computer Access, Inc.

A disabled student officer for a college needs to satisfy a last minute request for a book in DAISY format for a student. How does the officer search sources, download, and deliver the book with one easy to use app? Learn about this and other new solutions from Dolphin Computer Access.

Audience: All

Exhibitor Sponsored Session

#6.7 Campus-Wide text Reader Accommodation – Read:OutLoud University

Ben Johnston, Don Johnston, Inc.

As your university increasingly relies on eBooks, Bookshare, and online articles, you have an opportunity to make these materials accessible to students with learning disabilities. This session will demonstrate Read:OutLoud, the new easy-to-use eBook and Internet reader that is available as an affordable campus-wide license for every computer—including student and teacher laptops.

Audience: All

Exhibitor Sponsored Session

#6.8 ClockWork Database Scheduler

Barouch Chai, Microcomputer Science Centre, Inc.

Come learn how counselors and students can benefit from using Clockwork to streamline the management of disabled students’ needs in the Postsecondary world. The ClockWork Scheduler is a secure, multi-purpose, scheduling & tracking database system currently in use in many Colleges and Universities in Canada and the United States. ClockWork helps accessibility offices, student service centres and other departments to computerize student data so that they can organize, manage and assist special needs students in the postsecondary world. Under one networkable software, clockwork allows counselors to share information in an intuitive, flexible and customizable environment. The ClockWork software features online test and exam scheduling, a tutoring module, a note-taking module, plus the ability to interface with any post-secondary database or calendar system, not to mention valuable statistics / reports generation, and much, much more.

Audience: All

Exhibitor Sponsored Session

#6.9 DBTAC: Southeast ADA Center

Elaine Sutton-Mbionwu, Assistant Director / Training & Technical Assistance

The ADA National Network by DBTAC (www.adata.org) is the leader in the provision of customized information, guidance, training, and technical assistance on the Americans with Disabilities Act. Do you have questions about the New Amendments to the ADA? Are you eager to join the ranks of other institutions of higher learning, businesses and other entities seeking voluntary compliance status? If so, we encourage you to join us for a very informative, engaging, and interactive session in which we will explore ways to enhance your efforts towards creating a fully inclusive and accessible learning environment at your home institutions of higher learning.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#6.10 Learn How to Save Time Acquiring Braille and Electronic Textbooks for Students

Mike Bastine, Alternate Text Production Center

Christopher Lee, The Alternative Media Access Center

Sandra Greenberg, Alternate Text Production Center

Jaime Montgomery, Alternate Text Production Center

With altmedia demand remaining high, while our institutional budgets are dwindling, learn how to better utilize the Alternate Text Production Center (ATPC) and the Access Text Network (ATN) to save valuable time in acquiring textbooks. New resources and capabilities will be highlighted describing how to attain Braille and Electronic Textbooks (E-Text) products as quick as possible. The presentation will also define “quality” Braille and Braille’s classroom future.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

#6.11 Thinking Beyond Surveys: Developing an Assessment Plan for Your DS Office

Kristie Orr, Texas A&M University

Paul Harwell, Texas A&M University

Demonstrating effectiveness is becoming critical in higher education. Satisfaction surveys can indicate whether students are satisfied, but how do you know what they are getting out of their experience? This session will provide DS coordinators with multiple methods for measuring satisfaction, learning outcomes, and effectiveness that can be used to develop an assessment plan for DS offices.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

#6.12 International perspective on Disability Studies: Overview and History of Interlinking Popular, Academic, and Service Movements

Devva Kasnitz, Devvaco Consulting President, Society for Disability Studies

Alberto Guzman, University of Arizona, Vice President Society for Disability Studies

Conceived in 1984, the Society for Disability Studies (SDS) is the first and largest of the world’s academic societies of disability studies. We will sketch the growth and the development of disability studies in the light of popular disability social movements and the growth of campus disability services. We will highlight some of the basic theoretical, methodological, and organizational differences in world disability studies approaches and how they connect to disability rights and disability justice movements. One goal of group discussion is to share how academic and service personnel can better ally to achieve and disseminate a more nuanced understanding of disability, in all its complexity, through possible future joint SDS/AHEAD projects.

Audience: All

Partnering with Disability Studies

Concurrent Block 7

Friday July 15, 2011 11:00 am-12:15 pm

#7.1 Singing a Different Tune: Supporting Blind and Low Vision Musicians from Audition through Graduation

Bill McCann, Founder and President, Dancing Dots

Cathy L. Shankman, University of Pennsylvania

A talented blind musician has just been accepted to your school on the strength of a dazzling audition. Your mission: build a team of professionals that can find him accessible materials, resources and training to get him through. But wait! Has anybody asked the student how he plans to handle reading and writing music? Does the student have the literacy skills required to participate fully in music courses? Is further preparation needed before admission is granted? What *is* braille music anyway? Can we magnify print music for him? Who are the people within and outside of your school who can form a team to support the student? What have others done in the past that has worked for them? Come to get answers to these and other questions related to including blind and low vision students in your school’s music courses.

Audience: Intermediate

Sustainable Access through Technology

#7.2 Understanding the Need for Veteran Learning Communities

Mary Lee Vance, University of Montana

Wayne Miller, University of Connecticut: Storrs

Sandra E. Burnett, Santa Monica College

Paul Grossman, Hastings College of the Law

(Throughout this Conference, Mr. Grossman is participating in his private capacity. The views expressed in his presentations will be the result of his independent research and do not necessarily represent the views of the US Department of Education or government.)

Universities committed to diversity have long recognized the need to set aside space for veteran learning communities. However, set aside space for veterans is not yet as widely accepted or understood. In this session, participants will learn about current research, best practices and personal experiences that will be helpful in building cases for campus student veteran centers and their relationship with disability support services.

Audience: All

Partnering to Promote Diversity

#7.3 Diversity and Disability: International Students and Disability Services

Lauren Sebel, Austin Community College

International students with disabilities need to know that they are welcome to participate in all aspects of college life. Programs should reflect the diversity of a campus, by including targeted outreach to and access for students with disabilities as well as other under-represented groups. This program will assist Disability Service providers with the tools to help get international students with disabilities off to the right start, and encourage them to use the services that are available to them.

Audience: All

International Perspectives and Partnerships

#7.4 Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities

Starvis Smith, US IRS Recruitment Office

President Obama’s Executive Order 13548, “Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities” underscores the importance of providing increasing employment opportunities college students, and other young people with disabilities. Each federal agency will be submitting its proposal on how to implement the EO, and the Department of Labor is expected to name the Workforce Recruitment Program as a pipeline for quality applicants. This session will highlight what is being done on a national level for the employment of people with disabilities, as well as an agency perspective of what the Department of Labor plans to do in order to meet the expectations of the President’s EO.

Audience: All

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition

#7.5 Tough Choices: Challenges of Working in a One-Person DSS Office

Andy Christensen, Carleton College

Solo practitioners in disability services are invariably charged with more responsibilities and duties than one person can reasonably handle. We rely on others to make up the difference. We meet with students and parents, evaluate documentation, proctor exams, provide accessible texts, and give input across campus. We will consider which responsibilities to delegate, and which to do ourselves. Attendees will be empowered to make tough decisions about priorities that solo practitioners must make each day by discussing how similar decisions are made on other campuses.

Audience: Novice

New and Newer DS Professionals: Sustaining the Mission

#7.6 Conversation and Collaboration: Faculty and Disability Services Partnerships

Cheryl Muller, University of Arizona

Meghan Sooy, University of Arizona

A partnership between disability resource staff and university faculty is a key component in impacting the academy to create usable courses for students with disabilities. Ongoing, purposeful conversation with faculty is the most effective way to move past retroactive curricular “band-aids” to systemic curricular change. The presenters will provide strategies for leveraging requests for accommodation into opportunities for engaging faculty in discussions about course design to create sustainable curricular changes that benefit all learners.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

#7.7 Introduction to Disability Studies Programs

Dennis Lang, University of Washington

Joanne Woiak, University of Washington

Undergraduate degree programs in disability studies provide students with a foundational understanding of the critical framework of DS by offering an “Introduction to Disability Studies” survey course. The literature on disability pedagogy devotes little attention to the unique objectives and challenges faced by students and instructors in such classes. The discussants will structure a discussion around a set of key pedagogic issues and questions such as: What strategies and exercises do we use to problematize incoming students’ understandings of “disability”; what texts and exercises help to examine disability in context with other features of identity and culture; to what debates in the field; how can we most effectively utilize narrative texts; how do we negotiate our status and authority as disabled or nondisabled instructors; and how do we manage classroom discussion and create space for the voices of the disempowered and contrary opinions. This session will open up conversation about how both students and instructors can become empowered to examine and confront the dominant discourses about disability in higher education and the broader culture.

Audience: All

Partnering with Disability Studies

#7.8 Improving Achievement and Employment Outcomes Through College for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

Margo Izzo, The Ohio State University Nisonger Center

This session describes four postsecondary programs for students with intellectual disabilities that include college classes, internships and social activities. Emerging research indicates that college experiences improve academic, employment and adult living outcomes. See how Ohio is developing a statewide network of universities that provide Project SEARCH internships and college classes to promote improved transition outcomes.

Audience: All

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition

#7.9 Project LINC: A Partnership for Inclusive Foreign Language Learning

Sally Scott, University of Mary Washington

Wade Edwards, Longwood University

This session will provide an overview of Project LINC, a collaborative project and emerging curriculum designed to assist foreign language faculty in providing inclusive college classroom instruction. Communication tools and instructional practices generated during a year-long faculty development series will be shared. Participants will be encouraged to share and discuss successful practices in building partnerships on their own campuses.

Audience: All

Partnering to Implement Universal Design Across Campus

#7.10 Advancing Access for Everyone: A Strategic Planning Process in Support of the Social Justice Model

Susan Aase, University of Minnesota

Donna Johnson, University of Minnesota

Discover the tools to engage in a guided and purposeful strategic planning process resulting in the identification of mission, vision, and values statements, consistent with the social justice model to inform service delivery, collaborations, and partnerships. Take away useful information and practical suggestions in support of a strategic plan for services, initiatives, events, partnerships, and collaborations on a postsecondary campus.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#7.11 Universal Access to High-Quality Information through Mainstream Publishing

Alicia Wise, Elsevier Limited

Publishers around the world are waking up to the opportunities, and challenges, of better serving their customers who are blind, dyslexic, or who have other viewing- or reading-related disabilities. Find out what initiatives are underway and the steps being taken to ensure more publications are accessible to more people.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Technology

#7.12 A Testing Agency’s Response to the ADA Amendments Act

Loring Brinckerhoff, Educational Testing Service

Ruth Loew, Educational Testing Service

With passage of the ADA Amendments Act (ADA AA), testing agencies are reexamining documentation requirements and accommodations provisions. In particular, Educational Testing Service (ETS), the world’s largest testing agency, is modifying some of its procedures. The relevance of the ADA AA to standardized testing will be discussed, as well as how the ADA AA regulations help shape policies and procedures.

Audience: All

Topics in DS: ADAAA in Practice

Concurrent Block 8

Friday July 15, 2011 2:30 pm-4:30 pm

#8.1 Accessible Video: Techniques, Tools, Strategies, and Solutions – Session III

Jayme Johnson, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

Sean Keegan, Stanford University

Ken Petri, The Ohio State University

Terrill Thompson, DO-IT, University of Washington

This session is the last of a three part overview of the day long preconference on Accessible Video Production. It is the presenter’s expectation that participants have attended the preconference or session I & II of this series.

Creating accessible video is often viewed as a difficult, hands-on process, requiring specific skills and technologies. By identifying the proper tools and refining video production processes, it is possible to integrate accessibility into media presentations. As video becomes an ever increasing delivery format, it is necessary that institutions are familiar with the appropriate technologies available to address captioning and audio descriptions for their video productions.

Audience: Intermediate

Sustainable Access through Technology

#8.2 A Strategy to Develop Allies and Create Diversity

Elaine Ostroff, Institute for Human Centered Design

Karen Braitmayer, Studia Pacifica, LTD

William Pollard, University of Massachusetts Boston

This roundtable discussion highlights the strategy of using an RFP as an opportunity to engage allies in solving a shared problem. Brief reviews of recent examples from several universities who have successfully responded to a specific RFP to expand diversity on their campuses will be followed by opportunities for DSS coordinators to share their strategies to create partnerships.

Audience: All

Partnering to Promote Diversity

#8.3 Disabled “Starchitects” by 2020? Why not? How Can we Achieve this Goal?

Sandra Manley, University of the West of England

Ann de Graft-Johnson, University of the West of England

Katie Lucking, University of the West of England

Why are very few disabled people at the top of their professions? Drawing on research by the University of the West of England in partnership with the Royal Institute of British Architects this interactive session will reflect on how good practice in supporting disabled people might help to produce some starchitects or top lawyers, surgeons, engineers, professors etc. At the end of the session delegates should understand the main findings of the RIBA research and through an interactive session designed to draw on the experiences of delegates reflect on the actions they could take in their own situations.

Audience: All

International Perspectives and Partnerships

#8.4 Office for Civil Rights, Year in Review

Howard Kallem, OCR, U.S. Dept. of Education

Joan Rubin, OCR, U.S. Dept. of Education

Two representatives of OCR will present 10-12 important OCR letters and/or resolution agreements issued within the year. While the specific topics were not established at “press time,” you can be sure that the presentation will include issues of great interest to all disability service practitioners. While letters issued by OCR regional offices do not represent agency policy, they can be a guide to how the agency approaches issues and be a great resource to you as you manage your program.

Audience: All

Civil Rights and Disability Legislation: Sustaining our Work

#8.5 Introduction to Access/Assistive Technology

Dan Comden, University of Washington

New to Access/Assitive Technology (AT)? Learn how AT is used in higher ed to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities through discussion, videotape and live demonstration. We’ll cover basics of AT, the importance of non-AT computing support, and a thorough overview of the hardware and software that can be used by students with disabilities. Participants will develop their knowledge of AT and come away with resources to pursue more detailed learning and information about what is working now for technology accommodations in higher education.

Audience: All

New and Newer DS Professionals: Sustaining the Mission

#8.6 Executive Functioning: Helping Students be Successful In and Out of the Classroom

Christy Lendman, Lendman Educational Consulting

Lydia Block, Ohio Wesleyan University

To be successful, students need to set goals, plan and implement, monitor and change course, and maintain motivation and emotional levels. These executive functions help students manage their schedules, navigate campus, balance coursework and access services. This session will discuss the role of executive functions in successful acclimation to higher education both socially and academically.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

#8.7 Access to Employment: The Wrap Around Experiential Education Model for Success

Veronica Porter, Northeastern University

Diane Ciarletta, Northeastern University

Marci Shaffer, Northeastern University

The unemployment rate for college graduates with disabilities is extremely high. A college graduate with a disability is much more likely to be unemployed than a nondisabled peer. This presentation will focus on a holistic systemic approach to working with students with disabilities based on collaboration, advocacy, feedback, knowledge of disabilities, partnerships with employers and available resources.

Participants will learn strategies for collaborating with professionals both inside and outside the college campus to support students toward obtaining access to the world of work.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#8.8 Transitions Project: Opportunities for Postsecondary Success for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

Cathy Schelly, Colorado State University

Julia Kothe, Colorado State University

Presenters will describe a postsecondary program for students with ID, explaining how students are benefitting from academic support, socialization, assistive technology, self-advocacy, and career exploration. Speakers will also provide information on UDL implementation by high school and university instructors to promote academic success for students with ID and all learners.

Audience: All

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition

#8.9 Partnering to Institutionalize Best Practices: A Panel of Perspectives

Kaela Parks, University of Alaska Anchorage

Melanie Thompson, Northern Illinois University

Scott Friedman, William Rainey Harper College

Melanie Gangle, University of Portland

A panel of professionals discuss examples from their individual campuses that showcase how institutions can move beyond a strict compliance model to proactively plan for a wide range of users. Examples include partnerships and collaborations, design decisions, policy developments, budgeting approaches, and programming that foster inclusive campus climates. Participants will be encouraged to share their own experiences.

Audience: All

Partnering to Implement Universal Design Across Campus

#8.10 Symposium on STEM Education (Includes both presentations)

Community Partnerships for Enhancing Access to STEM Education for Students with Disabilities

Ronda Jenson, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Alexis Petri, University of Missouri-Kansas City

A community approach involving DSS coordinators, faculty, administrators, and campus resources from 2-year and 4-year colleges can lead to improved access to STEM education. The presenters will describe how KC-BANCS (Building an Alliance for New Careers in STEM) has employed strategies of collective inquiry to plan for and implement universal design solutions for students with disabilities. Through hearing and viewing examples, participants will learn strategies for facilitating collaborative problem-solving among community partners on the topics of access and universal design.

AccessSTEM and AccessComputing: Creating Sustainable Partnerships at Local and National Levels

Lyla Crawford, DO-IT, University of Washington

Sheryl Burgstahler, DO-IT, University of Washington

Project personnel will explain how they applied methods grounded in multidisciplinary knowledge management, collaboration, and social network theory and practice, to create and evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-tier organizational structure of local and national partners, collaborators, and affiliates. Project partners implemented systemic change in the organizations they represented; undertook recruitment, retention, and training activities; and furthered capacity-building with stakeholders. At this session participants will increase their knowledge of strategies they can use to create sustainable partnerships with local and national collaborators.

Audience: All

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#8.11 From Outrage to Collective Responsibility: Understanding Technologist Views of Web Accessibility

Jeremy Sydik, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Christy Horn, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Many students with disabilities need web accessibility enhancements to equally participate, both in the classroom and in the world. While standards and resources explain accessibility principles, this need is still largely unmet in practice. This lecture presents a qualitative study of technically-oriented discussions about web accessibility and how the themes discovered might inform collaborations to produce accessible content. By examining perceptions about the lack of information about accessible web development, participants will learn more about their ability to successfully inform and guide these collaborations.

Audience: Intermediate

Sustainable Access through Technology

#8.12 Putting It Together: Accommodations for the Student with Deafblindness

Lawrence Rhodes, PEPNet-West

This session provides an overview for identifying and providing appropriate supports for students who have both visual and auditory impairments. It examines the definitions of deafblindness. It then looks at accommodations and supports in the light of the definitions. The session shares resources on state and federal levels that DSS personnel can access for additional supports when providing services to this low incidence student population.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

Concurrent Block 9

Saturday July 16, 2011 9:00 am-10:00 am

#9.1 Techniques for Alt Format Production

Ron Stewart, Chair AHEAD Instructional Materials Accessibility Group

This session will introduce participants to some of the basic concepts and techniques required for the effective production of alternative format materials. Participants will explore the use of document styles as well as other simple techniques that lead to the creating of standardized source files that can then be repurposed to student ready accessible instructional materials (AIM).

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Technology

#9.2 DSS and an Academic Skills Center in Higher Education: Forming a Partnership

Catherine Axe, Brown University

Lessons learned from a new partnership between Disability Support Services and the Academic Support Center at Brown University during the 2010 to 2011 academic year will be presented. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and share their own experiences about inter-departmental collaborations. Participants will gain knowledge about others’ experiences with collaborations to gain insight about what aspects of collaboration to seek out and what aspects to avoid.

Audience: All

Partnering to Promote Diversity

#9.3 Toward Collaboration: A New Model of Service for Off-Shore Medical Students

Pamela O'Callaghan, Ross University School of Medicine

Robert Gee, Ross University School of Medicine

Providing accommodation abroad is difficult. This presentation by faculty at an off-shore medical school provides information about how to serve students with disabilities in an international

environment. The session will explore a new collaborative model of service that includes counseling, academic support and disability services and will discuss the issues associated with accommodating students in this setting. Participants will understand the obstacles students face studying outside the U.S. and through presentation and discussion will become more aware of the impact that a collaborative service model can have on students.

Audience: All

International Perspectives and Partnerships

#9.4 Residence Hall Requests: An Old Issue with New Twists and NO RULES!

L. Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

Jane Jarrow, DCCOL

A number of OCR and case law precedents provide guidance regarding charges for disability-related housing assignments, but these precedents all predate the proliferation of new housing alternatives. When options go beyond single vs. double room and include suites, specialty dorms (e.g., Freshmen or upper classman), distance factors, and more, how do you determine what is fair, just, and appropriate?

Through lecture and discussion, participants will come to understand the importance of a close working relationship with Residence Life staff, as well as an organized approach to assessing disability-related needs and options in housing.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Best Practices in Disability Services

#9.5 Mission Possible: An Interactive Guide to Being Proactive Rather than Reactive in a DS Office

Justin O’Sullivan, Kaplan University - Online

Tiffani Ashline, Kaplan University - Online

DS coordinators ensure the provision of reasonable accommodations to students with documented disabilities. How prepared and confident is your DS office in which to proactively meet the needs of students with varying disabilities? This session will be presented by two DSS coordinators who will provide details on self-identification, self-disclosures, supporting documentation, reasonable accommodations, associated resources, liability mitigation, proper training and overall best practices for a well functioning DS office.

Audience: Novice

New and Newer DS Professionals: Sustaining the Mission

#9.6 Movin’ on Up: Transition and Transfer from 2-year to 4-year College

Eve Nichols, Metropolitan State University

Jane Larson, Minneapolis Community and Technical College

This workshop will take transfer/transition issues to another level by focusing on the obstacles to successful transition for non-traditional, especially older, students with disabilities moving on to four-year colleges and universities. The presenters explore this new terrain and offer best practices for how Disability Services offices at two-year and four-year colleges can collaborate to assist students.

To understand what works and what doesn’t work for non-traditional students with disabilities planning to transfer from a lower division college to an upper division college or university. Understanding will come from audience participation exercises and discussion on barriers faced by non-traditional students. Ideas that work, and some that don’t, will be presented by the presenters from their five-year collaboration to improve successful enrollment.

Audience: All

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition

#9.7 Self-Advocacy & Disclosure: An Interactive Model for Developing Skills in Students with Disabilities

Lisa Toft, Northeastern University

Courtney Joly-Lowdermilk, Northeastern University

College students - especially college students with disabilities - are well-served to have strong communication skills, specifically when disclosing their disability. This interactive, multi-modal session is designed to offer disability providers with a best-practice workshop focused on building the self-advocacy and disclosure skills of college students with disabilities. Attendees will experience the workshop as students, then debrief as professionals.

Audience: All

Topics in DS: Students with Disabilities

#9.8 The HTCTU Veterans Resource Center (VRC) Project

Gaeir Dietrich, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

Myra Lerch, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

The High Tech Center Training Unit of the California community colleges is sponsoring a two-year pilot project creating Veterans Resource Centers that include assistive technology (AT) and serve to assist returning vets in transitioning into the community college system. We discuss the project and present a simple model that other colleges can implement.

Audience: All

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition

#9.9 Improving Course Accessibility: Universal Design Faculty Learning Community

Trina Geye, Tarleton State University

Engaging faculty in creating accessible curriculum is critical in implementing Universal Design campus-wide. A University disability services provider will discuss facilitating a Universal Design faculty learning community. The original semester long endeavor has now spanned three semesters and has expanded to include additional topics and participants. Obtaining support from the administration, recruiting participants and a process overview will be addressed. Participants will leave with an understanding of the steps to take to design and implement a Faculty Learning Community focusing on Universal Design on their campus.

Audience: Intermediate

Partnering to Implement Universal Design Across Campus

#9.10 Class Act: Sustainable Partnership between Vocational Rehabilitation and Postsecondary Institutions Promoting Self Actualization

Michelle Mitchell, Lehigh Carbon Community College

Christie Gilson, Moravian College -- Education Department

High school students often have grand illusions of college life, and disability considerations can complicate college preparation. A highly successful program to prepare students with disabilities for college life will be presented in this workshop. Examples of curriculum and lessons learned from implementation will be shared.

Audience: Intermediate

Creative Partnerships to Promote Sustainable Access

#9.11 Using Technology with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

Mela Bennett, American River College

The purpose of this workshop is to encourage educators to think creatively outside the box when it comes to finding, including and using technology as part of the learning process with d/Deaf and Hard of Hearing students. The objective is to encourage educators to think beyond products that are marketed or designed for d/Deaf and Hard of hearing students such as captioning software and devices which help communication access, and find any (and all) technology that can be used to help a student’s learning outcome. This can be done by using existing resources and developing relationships with the educational and assistive technology department on campus, collaborating with other off-campus colleagues across the country, and by sharing ideas and experiences with technology used with d/Deaf and Hard of Hearing students using a wiki site.

Audience: All

Sustainable Access through Technology

#9.12 How Coaching Impacts The Academic Functioning Of University Students with LD and/or ADHD

Kristen Rademacher, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

David Parker, CRG, Inc.

College students with LD and/or ADHD often struggle with executive functioning, study skills and self-determination, putting them at risk for academic underachievement and chronic degrees of frustration/stress. Coaching - an intervention where students develop structures for greater time-management, focus, self-confidence and self-awareness - is an academic service being offered by growing numbers of campuses to address the needs of this population. How successful is coaching? Participants will learn about a study of university students who received coaching for a full year and its impact on their executive functioning, study skills and self-determination.

Audience: All

Expanding Campus Partnerships: Emerging Student Populations and Transition