Concurrent Sessions

The AHEAD 2012 Conference and pn2 Training Institute offer a number of informative concurrent sessions arranged in Topical Tracks. While you may choose any session that you’d like, we offer themes for those who want to explore particular topics in depth. Words in italics after each description indicate the topical tracks and areas along with the intended audience level. Information below was current to date and may be subject to change.

Pre-selection of sessions you plan to attend is required. Please review the following session information below or online, choose the one session during each block that you plan to attend, and indicate those choices on your Conference Registration Form.

Concurrent Block 1

Wednesday July 11, 2012 9:00 am - 11:00 am

#1.1 Producing More Accessible Digital STEM Content

Teresa Haven, Arizona State University

This hands-on workshop will guide participants in enhancing structured e-text with MathML coding to create digital STEM materials that are accessible to a wide range of users, including those reading visually, with screen readers, with magnification, and with TTS utilities.

Audience: Intermediate to Advanced

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#1.2 OUT OF THE BOX! What the Law Says... and the Professional Judgment to Apply It

Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

Carol Funckes, University of Arizona

Civil rights legislation provides a strong and important foundation for the work we do in higher education and disability. However, it cannot be the sole resource that informs our practice. Disability studies scholarship and universal design offer us a lens through which to interpret legal guidance in ways that maintain compliance, seek true equity and represent disability positively. In this session, we will summarize the foundational legal principles that support our work and discuss the professional judgment and philosophical grounding required to apply them well.

Audience: Novice

#1.3 OCR Year in Review

Howard Kallem, US Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights

The Office for Civil Rights ensures equal access to education and promotes educational excellence throughout the US through active enforcement of civil rights. OCR serves student populations facing discrimination and guides advocates and institutions to promote systemic solutions to civil rights problems. An important responsibility of the agency is resolving complaints of discrimination. This session reviews illustrative cases and decisions over the last year which may help you in formulating policy and practice on your own campus.

Audience: All

The Impact of Law on Practice

#1.4 Advising and Coordination: Fundamentals to Making Study Abroad Accessible

Irene Scott, Texas A&M University

Alicia Guevara, Texas A&M University

Matthew Rader, IES Abroad

Coordinating accommodations for study abroad programs can seem overwhelming. This interactive lecture will guide Disability Services staff through the planning process from the student’s self-disclosure to the time of departure. Case studies will be utilized to facilitate discussion on ways to arrange accommodations, collaborate with the Study Abroad staff, and address issues that may arise abroad.

Audience: Intermediate

Multi-cultural and International Perspectives on Disability

#1.5 Using Goal Attainment Scaling to Measure Transition Success for Students with Disabilities

Catherine Schelly, Colorado State University

Patti Davies, Colorado State University

Professionals are eager to guide transitioning students through college and into employment. For many students, the transition path is fraught with challenges that are difficult to navigate. This interactive presentation demonstrates how to use Goal Attainment Scaling to assist students in establishing measurable and attainable goals that serve as a source of encouragement and accountability and to measure program success.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#1.6 Students and Youth Advocates Speak: The Diversity in Disability Student Symposium (DDSS)

Susan Mann Dolce, University at Buffalo

Randy Borst, University at Buffalo

Michael Rembis, University at Buffalo

David Dodge, University at Buffalo

This concurrent session, valuable for all attendees, demonstrates the Diversity in Disability Student Symposium (DDSS) at the University at Buffalo during the 2011-2012 academic year. Explore DDSS planning, marketing, program events and outcomes using videos, presentations by student(s), professional and faculty mentors, and group discussion. Learn how students, accessibility professionals and Disability Studies faculty collaborated for advocacy and change.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#1.7 Practitioner Research: Summer Transition Program for Students with LD Improve Student Engagement

Deborah Tsagris, Durham College and UOIT

Evidence based practices for students with LD will demonstrate how use of website creation enhanced students skills and willingness to disclose to professors. Research findings from a study commissioned by the HEQCO of an Ontario College and University summer transition program and enhanced supports verified that STP improved student engagement, use of LD supports, which in turn improved academic performance.

Audience: All

Promoting and Demonstrating Universal Design on our Campuses

#1.8 The Veterans are Coming Home! Who are the Wounded Warriors and What Does that Mean for our Profession? (Part 1 of 3)

Paul Grossman, Hastings College of Law

(Throughout this Conference, Mr. Grossman is participating in his private capacity. The views expressed in his presentations will be the result of his independent research and do not necessarily represent the views of the US Department of Education or government.)

In 2009 AHEAD surveyed members to learn how prepared they were to serve our veterans. The response was appallingly low. Since then, more and more members have each year begun to get more involved in campus initiatives to be more engaged with veterans and wounded warrior initiatives.

This three -part session will cover the A-Z of armed service veterans of the recent military actions in the Middle East wars, who are currently either enrolled, or in the process of enrolling, in our post secondary institutions. From theory to best practices, the days’ sessions will provide participants an “everything you need to know” to understand and serve students who are veterans. The first session will provide background information on the modern day military and types of action, who our veterans are today, and, in particular, who our wounded warriors are. This session will mostly be lecture format.

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#1.9 Outreach By Design: Creating and Managing Your Toolkit

Susan Aase, University of Minnesota

Cynthia Fuller, University of Minnesota

Linda Wolford, University of Minnesota

Through lecture and interactive/experiential demonstrations, this session will provide participants with strategies for the conceptualization, development, implementation, and evaluation of effective marketing, education, and training tools necessary for customized campus outreach. Strategies and tools to build an outreach toolkit will be shared that will result in service providers being planful, proactive, and prepared, not overwhelmed.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

[SESSION CANCELLED] #1.10 Forging Partnerships: High Schools, Disability Services and University Resources for College Students

Phyllis Jones, Arizona State University

How do we effectively “bridge the gap” between high school stakeholders, disability support services and the university campus resources which are conducive for students to transition successfully from high school to college? The Disability Resource Center at Arizona State University is building these partnerships through “on campus transition fairs” and at high school presentations. Join us for this informative presentation.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education

#1.11 Two-Year Campus Partnerships: Developing an Effective Faculty/Staff Training Series

Jennifer Radt, University of Cincinnati - Clermont

Are you wondering how to increase awareness for disability related issues on your two-year campus? Do you wish you could dialogue with faculty and staff on a regular basis about these important issues? Learn how one two-year campus developed and implemented a successful training series with minimal cost and maximum benefit. Participants will also have an opportunity to share ideas and experiences from their own campuses.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

pepnet 2 - #1.12 Postsecondary Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Coordinator Summit

Anna Johnson, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Amy Hogle, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Increasing numbers of students and decreasing resources create enormous pressure on those responsible for coordinating DHH services. Join your peers at this first ever Postsecondary DHH Services Coordinator Summit. Following Open Space Technology (OST), a participant empowered approach to meetings and conferences; your issues, questions and concerns drive the Agenda. Participants’ experiences and creative thinking provide the resolutions that you seek.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #1.13 A (college administrator’s) Journey into the Deaf-World

Leah Subak, Kent State University

Amy Quillin, Kent State University

Shannon Cowling, Kent State University

Olivia Krise, Kent State University

Ever wonder why interpreters/administrators respond the way they do? An interactive session including presentations by an administrator of accessibility services and staff interpreters from Kent State University discussing culture’s significance in service delivery for d/Deaf/hh students. Preliminary data from a research study on interpreter second culture adaptation will be contrasted with personal narratives to illustrate examples of essential mindful cultural responsiveness. Please bring text pager/cell phone for on-line polling.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #1.14 Communication Access for Hard of Hearing and Oral Deaf

Heather Holmes, pn2 - Western Oregon University

Cheryl Davis, Western Oregon University

Service providers sometimes question whether a student who is hard-of-hearing qualifies for services. The goal of this session is to help service providers understand the interplay of hearing loss, environmental variables, and the range of accommodations to improve their evaluation of appropriate accommodations. Participants are invited to bring their smart phones/iPads to download and experiment with apps during this session.

Audience: All

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Concurrent Block 2

Wednesday July 11, 2012 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

#2.1 Hands-on with the AccessText Network

Robert Martinengo, AMAC, Georgia Tech

Christopher Lee, AMAC, Georgia Tech

Learn how to get the most out of the AccessText application at this hands-on session. We will cover the basics of requesting, tracking, and receiving publisher files, as well as tips and tricks for creating custom reports. AccessText is the unique, free service that gives Disabled Student Service professionals full control over their requests to leading textbook publishers, including Pearson, Cengage, and McGraw-Hill. This session is appropriate for AccessText members of all experience levels as well as non-members.

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#2.2 OUT OF THE BOX! Applying Disability Studies in Disability Services

Wendy Harbour, Syracuse University

The fundamental tenet of disability studies is that disability is socially constructed in the environment, thus disability studies rejects the medical model of disability. So how can it apply in a field where legal definitions of disability and disability-related medical documentation guide the provision of services? This session will give a brief introduction to disability studies theory and its application in disability services, including the potential for universal design to address ableism on an individual and institutional level. This session is open to everyone, regardless of familiarity with disability studies or level of experience. We will move at a relaxed and welcoming place to allow for questions about disability studies theory and practice.

Audience: Novice

#2.3 A Dynamic Road Map: Navigating Evolving Documentation Standards Under the ADAAA

Mary Barrows, Northeastern University

Jennifer Newton, Northeastern University

The recent implementation of the ADAAA has driven a review of processes and polices for evaluating documentation. A brief history will outline the evolution of the current model used by the presenters, which considers documentation for students with LD and ADHD more broadly. The presenters will use case studies to share the worksheets developed to assist in determining reasonable accommodations.

Audience: Intermediate

The Impact of Law on Practice

#2.4 Race Matters: Supporting African-American Male Students with Disabilities

Michael Hughes, Bowie State University

Through phenomenological inquiry, we seek to illustrate the inner qualities that some African-American males with disabilities demonstrate that allow them to persist academically and socially while attending a historically black university. The African-American men in this study identified racial composition, supportive faculty, and the culturally-based support of the Director of Disability Services as critical for their success.

Audience: All

Multi-cultural and International Perspectives on Disability

#2.5 Strategies for Preparing a Well-Rounded and Self-Assured Job Seeker

Laura Cutway, Georgetown University

Sara Mahoney, Department of Labor, Disability Employment Policy

Veronica Porter, Northeastern University

The goal for this presentation is to provide the life cycle of the employment process to empower disability service providers to feel more confident in addressing employment related questions for students with disabilities. We will focus on the student as a whole, the application and interviewing process, the timeline for self-disclosure, and determining appropriate work-place accommodations.

Audience: Intermediate

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#2.6 Emerging Complexities: One College’s Efforts at a Film Series on Disability

Andrew Christensen, Carleton College

We all agreed on the need to expose our campus to more positive and intellectually rigorous portrayals of disability, but how exactly, and which films? This presentation will detail the deliberations that led to independent and mainstream film choices. We will show how we used film to further student dialogue on disability and build alliances across campus.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#2.7 A Best Practice Model for Collaborative Inclusive Design in Campus Recreation

Katheryne Staeger-Wilson, Missouri State University

This presentation will review the collaborative process among a disability resource professional, a university architect, campus recreation staff, and students with disabilities to create a campus recreation center with universal design features. It became evident that valuing the disability experience led to high quality design for all. From this project, best practices in inclusive, usable, and equitable design can be observed and applied to future projects.

Audience: All

Promoting and Demonstrating Universal Design on our Campuses

#2.8 The Veterans Are Coming Home! What are Current Postsecondary Best Practices? (Part 2 of 3)

Gaeir Dietrich, California Community Colleges

Sandra Burnett, Santa Monica University

Jorja Waybrant, University of North Carolina, Wilmington

Kelly Hermann, SUNY Empire State College

This second session in today’s series will feature a panel of national experts who have spoken widely on their veteran/wounded warrior best practices. Together, they will provide an array of examples and practices that are replicable.

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#2.9 No Paper Required: Going Green with Faculty/Student Communication and Requests for Academic Adjustments

Pamela Wilson, Central Washington University

Ian Campbell, Central Washington University

Bree Callahan, Central Washington University

Did the student request academic adjustments? When did that occur? What did the student request? The DS Office at CWU has designed a method for collecting this information - and more - while simplifying the accommodation request process for students and faculty. In this session, presenters will demonstrate CWU’s electronic system for requesting classroom accommodations and tracking the important details.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#2.10 The Making of ASPAS: A Partnership Model For Success

Vannee Cao-Nguyen, University of West Florida

This presentation will provide a framework for developing a program for students with Asperger Syndrome that will enhance their college experience both academically and socially. Focus will be on the partnerships developed between students, campus resources, and the coordinating office. Along with the coordinator, the students who participate in the Academic Support Program for students on the Autism Spectrum (ASPAS) at UWF will also be sharing their experience with the program.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education

#2.11 Linked Fate and Diversity in the 21st Century: Continuing the Conversation with Dr. Georgina Dodge

Dr. Georgina Dodge, University of Iowa

Participants are invited to join Georgina Dodge in dialog about issues raised during the keynote address, including concepts of linked fate, inclusion, and diversity in conjunction with disability. A primary focus will be on taking action within organizations, and case studies and scenarios will be used to explore and practice leadership skills in diversity work.

Audience: All

Featured Topics in DS

pepnet 2 - #2.12 Finding a Star: A Strategic Approach to Working with Underprepared Deaf/Hard-of-hearing Students

Gary Behm, Rochester Institute of Technology/NTID

Diane Heyden, Rochester Institute of Technology / NTID

Ronald Till, Rochester Institute of Technology / NTID

Dino Laury, Rochester Institute of Technology / NITD

The goal is to assist academically underprepared deaf and hard of hearing (d/hh) students in transition to STEM programs. A percentage of the d/hh students accepted at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) have limited English and mathematical skills. The Career Orientation & Retention for Engineering (CORE) was created to address the students’ lack of preparation.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #2.13 Online Discussion: Creating a Space for Authenticity, Equity, and Intersubjectivity

Carrie Lou Garberoglio, University of Texas at Austin

This presentation will combine preexisting literature and new empirical data showing how classroom settings with deaf students can benefit from using online discussion. The researcher proposes that using a combination of synchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) and face-to-face discussion allows for enhanced collaborative learning, direct communication, and meaningful interaction in classrooms that include deaf students.

Audience: all

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pepnet 2 - #2.14 The CAID Program: A Review of a Functional Assessment Approach for D/HH Individuals with an Additional Cognitive Disability

Lori Hutchison, CSC (Independent Contractor)

Deborah Endres, University of Pittsburgh

Jill Moriconi, Hiram G. Andrews Center

D/HH individuals are not immune to cognitive disabilities and the impact of not addressing this issue can have very detrimental effects on that individual’s ability to function independently in both the postsecondary setting and/or employment. The CAID program is a dynamic program utilizing functional assessment and intervention to provide the awareness, support and feedback the individual needs to succeed.

Audience: intermediate

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Concurrent Block 3

Wednesday July 11, 2012 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

#3.1 Social Networks: Introduction to using LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter in Career Development.

Jeanette Richards, San Diego State University

A highlight of some tools available on the most popular social networking websites! Emphasis will be on LinkedIn, with some content devoted to Facebook and Twitter. Learn how to advise college students on using social networks as they transition into the workforce. Topics covered include creating a professional profile, networking appropriately, finding connections (groups, companies, individuals), career exploration, and more!

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#3.2 OUT OF THE BOX! Introduction to Design for Non-Designers

Elizabeth Harrison, University of Dayton

What does design have to do with disability and higher education? Everything! This session will explore what design is and how the choices we make on our campuses and in our offices affect our work in large and small ways. Considering the power of design offers a new focus for creating welcoming campuses to new and seasoned professionals who are reconsidering access. Participants will practice analyzing design choices in a variety of areas of DS work.

Audience: Novice

#3.3 Findings from GAO’s Report on Federal Enforcement of Students’ Rights to Testing Accommodations

Debra Prescott, U.S. Government Accountability Office

Anjali Tekchandani, U.S. Government Accountability Office

GAO recently issued a report examining testing accommodations for individuals with disabilities taking postsecondary admissions and professional licensing exams administered by private testing companies. GAO recommended that the Department of Justice develop a strategic approach to target its enforcement efforts. In this presentation, representatives from GAO will present findings from the study.

Audience: All

The Impact of Law on Practice

#3.4 A Different Diversity?: Disability Studies Perspectives for Postsecondary Diversity Agendas

Lauren Shallish, Syracuse University

Legal mandates, legislative acts and institutional requirements can initiate but not always enforce the cultural evolution, communal appreciation and peer-acceptance for students with disabilities in higher education. Postsecondary diversity agendas must move beyond diversity into inclusive institutional practices to advance the full participation of all its members.

Audience: All

Multi-cultural and International Perspectives on Disability

#3.5 Creating a Network of Supports for Students with Intellectual Disabilities on Campus

Alisa Lowrey, LSUHSC Human Development Center

Beshundra Rogers, LSUHSC Human Development Center

Philip Wilson, LSUHSC Human Development Center

Christopher Hornberger, LSUHSC Human Development Center

A federally funded model demonstration program for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) presents the steps of creating a sustainable network of support for students with ID in a postsecondary setting. Key stakeholders will present strategies for successful collaboration and discuss lessons learned from the establishment of this web of support requiring a higher degree of problem solving.

Audience: All

Facilitating successful academic and vocational transitions

#3.6 Disability Studies and Disability Services: Uneasy but Growing Partnerships in Theory and Practice (Part 1 of 2)

Devva Kasnitz, Society for Disability Studies

Katheryne Staeger-Wilson, Missouri State University

Karen Pettus, Office of Student Disability Services

Alberto Guzman, University of Arizona

This continuing dialogue from past meetings examines the inherent structural tensions and mutual supports between disability studies as an academic field, and disability services as a practice field, as both become more sophisticated, more structured, more resource hungry, and generally more professionalized and analytical. We examine these push/pull factors as part of transformational social movement and organizational development theory.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#3.7 Being UD Before You Preach UD!

Frederic Fovet, McGill University

This presentation examines the evaluation process a Disability Service provider has undergone, with regards to its own services and service provision, in order to assess the accessibility of services through the Universal Design lens. The study draws on the identification and the assessment of pitfalls and hurdles to draw a conceptual checklist and define clear and transferable UD objectives with regards to the format of student service provision.

Audience: Intermediate

Promoting and Demonstrating Universal Design on our Campuses

#3.8 The Veterans are Coming Home! III. Putting Faces to the Stories (Part 3 of 3)

Moderated by Mary Lee Vance, University of Montana

Today’s third session will feature a panel of wounded warriors who are attending institutions of higher education. Their experiences and perspectives will be helpful to the audience in shaping the design of campus services and programs.

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#3.9 Bridging the Distance: Best Practices for Managing Disability Services on Your Satellite Campuses

Bree Callahan, Central Washington University

Rob Harden, Central Washington University

With the recent growth of extension and satellite campuses, how do Disability Services offices maintain effective and consistent services for this growing student population? Experienced post secondary disability service professionals Rob Harden and Bree Callahan discuss how “off-campus” students have broadened the focus of the Center for Disability Services at Central Washington University.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#3.10 Partnerships for Ongoing Transition: Kentucky’s Supported Higher Education Project

Elizabeth Harrison, University of Kentucky

Wendy Willeroy, University of Kentucky

Transition is not a single, identifiable point where change happens, but a continual process of learning and growth throughout the lifespan. Kentucky’s Supported Higher Education Project partners with students, postsecondary administrators, instructors, disability resource center personnel, local educational authorities, vocational rehabilitation specialists, employers, and many other people and entities to facilitate connections for students across educational, vocational, and personal domains.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive education

#3.11 Mapping the Future: A Conversation with the Outgoing and Incoming Presidents of AHEAD

Jean Ashmore, AHEAD President

L. Scott Lissner, AHEAD President Elect

Join us in exploring the contours of the field and AHEAD’s path into the future. Bring your bread crumbs and signposts Jean and Scott will have theirs.

Audience: All

pepnet 2 - #3.12 Language Learning - A Model That Works: Technology, Curriculum and Best Practices for Deaf ESOL Students

Erika Domatti, Austin Community College

Arlene Gunderson, Gallaudet University Regional Center SW & Austin Community College

Presented by a Deaf/Hearing bilingual team from Austin Community College, this workshop will outline an academic program that provides Deaf students with direct communication instruction and empowering curriculum in a visually accessible environment. There will be an emphasis on using technology to create an effective American Sign Language (ASL)/English bilingual program within a Deaf-centered environment.

Audience: Intermediate

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pepnet 2 - #3.13 Inclusive Living: Making Residential Halls Accessible for Students Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Jason Altmann- pn2 – University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Come and discover the cost-effective strategies implemented to create accessible, deaf-friendly activities and living environment at the residential halls. Participants will also be given an overview of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s ASL Living Learning Community and how ASL-LLC enhances the college experience for Deaf and Hard of Hearing students who use ASL to communicate.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #3.14 Test Equity: The Challenges and Issues

Mary Morrison, pn2 – University of Montana

This presentation will provide participants with a discussion of how test construct issues (what tests are intended to measure) and test language and format can influence what is actually measured by a test and how that knowledge can guide us in determining reasonable accommodations for deaf and hard of hearing students.

Audience: All

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Concurrent Block 4

Wednesday July 11, 2012 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm

#4.1 Become Familiar with the AHEAD/Wiley OCR Database

AHEAD Staff

Through a partnership with John Wiley & Sons, Inc. AHEAD is offering a free and useful tool created exclusively for its members. The searchable online database includes disability-related lawsuits, and OCR and FPCO rulings and letters from the late 1990s through the present. Search results include the full text of the lawsuits and OCR and FPCO rulings and concise summaries of each ruling written by an attorney who is also a journalist. If you haven’t used it yet, this session is an opportunity to learn about its features and try it out in a guided, hands-on setting.

Audience: All

#4.2 OUT OF THE BOX! Refocusing our Approach to Service Delivery

Melanie Thornton, University of Arkansas CURRENTS

Gladys Loewen, Consultant

Ever feel like you are in a rut at work, running from one crisis to another stuck in documentation, letters to faculty, and implementing procedures? The presenters will explore new ways of approaching DS practices and explore strategies to refocus your energy on becoming a campus leader who promotes appreciation of disability and models practices that lead to full participation for disabled people in higher education. In this interactive session, presenters will examine how the current approach of providing disability-related accommodations often gives the illusion of independence and equal opportunity, while in reality, forces disabled students to qualify for services, accept special treatment, and take on responsibilities for access that are far different from their non-disabled peers.

Audience: Novice to Intermediate

#4.3 Partnerships vs. FERPA and HIPAA: To Share or Not to Share?

Cynthia Gomez, John Wiley and Sons

Aileen Gelpi, John Wiley and Sons

Disability service providers must collaborate to serve students with disabilities. But partners such as faculty, counselors, police and internship supervisors may expect them to share information about students’ disabilities. This interactive session will help participants understand their obligations under federal privacy statutes so they can make legally sound decisions to ensure students’ needs are met while their rights are respected.

Audience: All

The Impact of Law on Practice

#4.4 Disability Support Services at HBCU’s: Are We Meeting the Needs of Students?

Bridget H. Staten, South Carolina State University

Quiteya D. Walker, Albany State University

There is little to no research on the degree to which DS staff at HBCUs are prepared to meet the needs of African American students with disabilities. The researchers investigated the competency, knowledge, and attitude of DS Staff at HBCUs. Results of this research will be presented and a model for minority-serving institutions will be introduced.

Audience: All

Multi-cultural and International Perspectives on Disability

#4.5 Transitioning Students on the Spectrum from College to Work: The Final Big Step For the Budding Professional

Shannon Murphy Mandadi, Arizona State University

The important issue of transitioning from being a college student with an Autism Spectrum Disorder to being a successful member of the work force is explored in this educational presentation. Three professionals from Arizona State University’s Disability Resource Center will explore this topic and offer specific examples and strategies for how to prepare college students for this awesome but potentially overwhelming transition.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#4.6 Disability Studies and Disability Services: Uneasy but Growing Partnerships in Theory and Practice (Part 2 of 2)

Devva Kasnitz, Society for Disability Studies

Katheryne Staeger-Wilson, Missouri State University

Karen Pettus, Office of Student Disability Services

Alberto Guzman, University of Arizona

This continuing dialogue from past meetings examines the inherent structural tensions and mutual supports between disability studies as an academic field, and disability services as a practice field, as both become more sophisticated, more structured, more resource hungry, and generally more professionalized and analytical. We examine these push/pull factors as part of transformational social movement and organizational development theory.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#4.7 Transition to College for Students with Disabilities: A Systems Approach

Stella Woodroffe, Kingsborough Community College

Helping students with disabilities to transition to college involves an interrelated system, which has Disability Support Services at its core. A community college DS Program Manager will present a comprehensive program that utilizes a systems approach to working with high school personnel, students with disabilities, parents and the college community to facilitate student transition to college.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#4.8 Status Report from the Transition and Postsecondary Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID)

Coordinating Center

Cate Weir, University of Massachusetts-Boston

Debra Hart, University of Massachusetts-Boston

Staff from the Office of Postsecondary Education’s TPSID Coordinating Center will share information on project and evaluation activities to date and preliminary findings regarding the accomplishments and outcomes from the twenty seven Transition and Postsecondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID) model demonstration sites.

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#4.9 Just Give Them What They Want?: Service Delivery in the New Millennium

Tom Merrell, University of San Francisco

Barbara Zunder, University of San Francisco

Charlene Lobo Soriano, University of San Francisco

Brooke Bassett, University of San Francisco

College and universities are seeing students with more complex needs that are taking more time to process, accommodate and, sometimes, address from a legal perspective. This panel of DS staff, students, and faculty will present an innovative service delivery model which simplifies the intake and eligibility process while also fostering student autonomy and creating inclusive learning communities.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#4.10 Supporting Adjunct Faculty in Providing Classroom Accommodations and Inclusive Teaching

Sally Scott, University of Mary Washington

Wade Edwards, Longwood University

With the growing numbers of adjunct instructors teaching college classes, it is important to provide information about disabilities for this often neglected group. Challenges facing adjunct instructors will be examined, and a case study of one campus’ work with foreign language adjuncts will be described. Participants will have the opportunity to share strategies and solutions for their own campus outreach.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education

#4.11 AHEAD Standing Committee Open Forum

Ron Stewart, AHEAD, Moderator

This session will provide the AHEAD membership with an introduction and overview of the workplans that have been developed by the five AHEAD Standing Committees: Membership, Professional Development, Diversity, International, and Policy. Participants will have the opportunity to meet the Chairs of the committees, ask questions and provide feedback on the goals and objectives that have been developed for the organization as it moves forward over the next few years.

Audience: All

pepnet 2 - #4.12 A Critical Need for Change in Educating Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Marcia Kolvitz, pn2 – University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Deaf education is a broad professional field that focuses on the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The students who ultimately benefit from educational programs represent a diverse group of learners with different needs, and often, additional learning issues. How can we best support state needs within the framework of state systems improvement activities that have a positive impact on all deaf or hard of hearing students? This presentation will provide an overview of recent National Summit activities and a discussion of critical issues.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #4.13 New Technology for a New Generation

Van Nguyen, pn2 – California State University, Northridge

Heather Holmes, pn2 – Western Oregon University

Today’s technology has experienced constant change and explosive growth. This workshop will review the short history of mobile technology which lead to the proliferation that is currently available. An overview of applications available for the iPhone, which is among some of the most popular smartphones today, for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #4.14 Leave No Deaf or HOH Nursing Student Behind! Adapting a Nursing Curriculum to Accommodate the Deaf or HOH Nursing Student

Anne Marie Killilea, Bunker Hill Community College

Secondary education opportunities for the deaf or HOH student have increased dramatically. Currently, very little information has been written describing a functioning nursing curriculum that has been adapted for the deaf or HOH student. Teaching counselors, parents, deaf or HOH students, college faculty and staff that nursing can be a career choice is the goal of this workshop.

Audience: All

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Concurrent Block 5

Thursday July 12, 2012 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

#5.1 Take Bookshare for a Test Drive!

Cherie Miller, Bookshare

Bookshare’s online digital library is an indispensible resource for postsecondary students to find the books they need for schoolwork and for pleasure reading. During this session in the computer lab, we’ll go hands-on to explore the digital database and learn about Bookshare’s new features.

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#5.2 OUT OF THE BOX! I’m Supposed to Understand Computers Too?!

Teresa Haven, Arizona State University

Newer DS professionals are often so focused on all the other details of this profession that Access Technology (AT) is left for “the geeks” to take care of. But what if your campus doesn’t have an access technology professional? Even if you do, what should you know about AT in order to be well-rounded and appropriately informed in your work? This session will provide an overview of the major access technology used by people with various disabilities, as well as the newer phenomenon of off-the-shelf technology serving as aids to access. You don’t need to be a geek to learn from this presentation!

Audience: Novice

#5.3 DOJ’s Regulations - Staying out of the Dog House: Service Animals and Assistance Animals under the ADA, 504,

and Fair Housing Act (Part 1 of 3)

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

Who’s not confused? DOJ says only dogs are ADA service animals, but miniature horses are reasonable modifications sometimes. HUD says the Fair Housing Act requires that you let assistance animals (not just dogs) – including emotional support animals – into housing. What should you do, what can you ask, and what has happened with the federal case against the University of Nebraska?

Audience: All

The Impact of Law on Practice

#5.4 Going Global: Transnational Education and International Disability Rights

Kelly Hermann, Empire State College SUNY

Jason Lane, University at Albany

Has your campus gone global with branch campuses in other countries? How will the US disability laws apply to students at these foreign locations? What about the impact of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and other domestic laws? Overwhelmed? The presenters will help you understand cross-border higher education and what it means for DS offices.

Audience: All

Multi-cultural and International Perspectives on Disability

#5.5 Bridging the Disconnect Between Disability and Career Offices to Improve Employment Outcomes

Howard Green, National Organization on Disability

Kara Leonard, Rochester Institute of Technology

Marilyn Mackes, National Association of Colleges and Employers-NACE

Cherri Pinkerton, J.B. Hunt Transport, Inc.

As employers expand diversity initiatives to include people with disabilities, they look to universities to source candidates but find a disconnect between the Disability and Career Offices. Our panel representing Disability and Career Offices, NACE, employers, and NOD will engage the audience in exploring creative ways to bridge this disconnect to improve employment opportunities and outcomes for students with disabilities.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#5.6 The Word Project: A Socio-Political Approach on Language

Alberto Guzman, University of Arizona

Jamie Axelrod, Northern Arizona University

Terra Beethe, Bellevue University

What’s in the name? Are you wrestling with your office name? Is “disability” too stigmatizing of a word? This presentation begins the conversation on language usage by postsecondary education professionals interacting with people with disabilities in an effort to move closer to a socio-political model. The presenters will also engage the audience in a hands-on exercise applying these constructs.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#5.7 Designing for Learning: Tools to Help Faculty Design More Inclusive Courses

Elizabeth Harrison, University of Dayton

DS providers can help change disabling learning environments by working with faculty on course design. This discussion-based session will (1) help participants understand faculty’s usual approaches to course design, (2) introduce participants to a freely available set of tools developed by the facilitator for working with faculty toward inclusive, learning-centered course design, and (3) provide practice using the tools.

Audience: All

Promoting and Demonstrating Universal Design on our Campuses

#5.8 Ohio’s Postsecondary Statewide Model: A Collaborative Approach to Improving Outcomes for Students with

Intellectual Disabilities

Evette Simmons-Reed, The Ohio State University

Alexa Murray, The Ohio State University

Lois Harris, The Ohio State University

Susie Rutkowski, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

The mission of Ohio’s statewide model, Transition Options in Postsecondary Setting for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TOPS), is to promote self-determination through a variety of activities including engagement in postsecondary classes, Project SEARCH employment internships, residential living and community participation. Discussion of Ohio’s model will describe the collaboration among disability services, faculty, and other support services to facilitate successful transitions.

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#5.9 Increasing Access by Decreasing Reliance on 3rd Party Documentation to Assess Accommodations

Adam Meyer, Eastern Michigan University

The current DS paradigm revolves heavily around the concept that third party documentation is required for students to access disability services. This presentation will review one college’s three year journey from operating under the “must submit documentation for services” model to operating under the notion that quality campus services can often be provided with minimal to no third party documentation.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#5.10 Programming for Students on the Spectrum in a Resource-Constrained Environment

Linn Jorgenson, George Mason University

Kristina DeSantis, George Mason University

When financial constraints create barriers in providing necessary support and services for students on the Spectrum, ODS staff worked collaboratively with other campus departments and community agencies to establish needed programs. The ODS staff will discuss their process in gathering stakeholders to identify gaps in services and develop programs. Lessons learned, continued challenges and programming ideas will be shared.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education

#5.11 Livescribe Smartpens Ease Student Transition from the Classroom to the Board Room

Holly De Leon, Livescribe Inc.

Paul Hippolitus, UC Berkeley

Cindy Jepsen, Arizona State University

People with learning disabilities face a lifelong challenge, not one that ends when they enter college or land their first job. As high school students with learning disabilities grow accustomed to the benefits of Smart Boards and other technology rapidly entering K12 classrooms, they walk into college feeling more comfortable with technology, but less prepared to take notes for themselves. And while many universities ease this transition by providing note taking accommodations, students leave college and enter the workforce facing the same challenge. Hear our panel as they discuss how they introduced a new and emerging assistive technology, Livescribe smartpens, to their students and the successful results to date, including significant university cost and time savings, as well as increased student independence and workforce readiness. They will share examples of other institutions using smartpens as transitional tools for remedial education, as well as offer ideas for how smartpens can be used as instructional devices for professors.

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

pepnet 2 - #5.12 How Students with Combined Hearing & Vision Loss Succeed in Higher Education

Susanne Morrow, Queens College -New York Deaf-Blind Collaborative

The challenges for students entering the higher education system are many. This challenge is tenfold for students with combined hearing and vision loss or deaf-blindness. Professionals in academia may have general knowledge of students with disabilities; however, students with combined hearing and vision loss often have additional needs that must be accommodated in order to succeed in higher education.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #5.13 Hard of Hearing Issues In & Out of Class: Exploring How Hearing Loss Can Impact Student Experience

Kriston Arbour, Durham College and UOIT

This session will explore the experiences of students who are hard of hearing outside the classroom from a sociological perspective. Discussion will focus on issues including intersecting marginalities, self-awareness, identity, disability disclosure and linkages with accessing academic support. Attendees will be encouraged to share best practices throughout the presentation and in small group discussions.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #5.14 Video Remote Interpreting: Requirements, Highlights, and Cautionary Tales from the VRI Studio and Classroom

Bambi Riehl, pn2 - University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Lisa Caringer, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Postsecondary Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) holds promise for meeting interpreting needs in all corners of the country. VRI might be challenging, but fearless providers are doing this work every day. This workshop will outline the current basic VRI requirements, variables and perspectives on the pros, cons and troubleshooting updates and legal considerations from those who either use or provide VRI.

Audience: All

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Concurrent Block 6

Thursday, July 12, 2012 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

#6.1 Making Text Accessible with Read:OutLoud and Snap&Read ™

Mary Jo Barry, Don Johnson, Inc.

This session demonstrates two affordable campus-wide reading tools: Read:OutLoud, the easy-to-use eBook and internet reader, and Snap&Read ™, a simple one-button toolbar that reads any text onscreen in any application. These tools read text anywhere including PDFs, Blackboard, Moodle, Bookshare, HTML as well as Flash and image-based websites, MS Word docs, and even the text in images.

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#6.2 OUT OF THE BOX! The Student Interview and Documentation Practices

Sharon Downs, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Heather Mole, McGill University

Our philosophy about documentation and the initial student interview has a tremendous impact on the student’s experience with the university as a whole. Participants will learn to frame interactions with students as a collaborative process. We will cover the purpose of the interview and documentation, as well as the role of the student as expert in identifying potential barriers to learning and inclusion.

Audience: Novice to Intermediate

#6.3 DOJ’s 2010 Regulations - Communications, Testing Accommodations, Event Ticketing Reservations, and Explorations of

OPDMD’s and Technology (Part 2 of 3)

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

James Bostrom, US Department of Justice

Has your institution modified its policies and practices to comply with the 2010 ADA regulations? If not, what do you need to know and what should you do? Learn how the revised regulations -- beyond buildings and animals – apply to colleges and universities, how to stay above the law, and what may lie ahead.

Audience: All

The Impact of Law on Practice

#6.4 The Global Reach Academic Success Program (GRASP): Supporting Students with Disabilities Abroad

Robyn Weiss, New York University

Lakshmi Clark McClendon, New York University

Michelle Witman, SAIL Consulting, LLC

Higher education has many challenges for students with disabilities, perhaps more so while studying abroad. This workshop will show how NYU is using an on-line, interactive classroom to create a supportive learning community for students with disabilities who choose to travel abroad. Explore the live classroom technology and be introduced to NYU’s on-line Global Reach Academic Success Program.

Audience: Intermediate

Multi-cultural and International Perspectives on Disability

#6.5 Assistive Technology Boot Camp: A Transitional Pilot Program for Incoming Freshmen

Cindy Jepsen, Arizona State University

This presentation will outline the process of designing and implementing a summer assistive technology boot camp to aid in the successful transition of incoming freshmen with disabilities to the college environment. The information will be presented in lecture and demonstration with audience participation welcome throughout the presentation.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#6.6 Beautiful Lives: Reframing Disability through the Lens of Positive Psychology

Neil Lipsitz, College of the Holy Cross

Eileen Berger, Harvard Graduate School of Education

This multi-media presentation illustrates the beautiful lives students with disabilities lead by focusing on the development of a positive approach to life. Factors influencing academic and social success will be discussed. Powerful student stories invite participants to dispel the myth that disabilities are negative and come to appreciate and approach students with disabilities with a fresh perspective and renewed commitment.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#6.7 Curricular Universal Design: Creating Accessible Writing Assignments for Students with Invisible Disabilities

Christopher Cruz Cullari, College of Staten Island CUNY

Sara Paul, College of Staten Island CUNY

Universal Design in the context of curriculum and instruction provides an opportunity for disability service providers to partner with faculty members to create accessible coursework. Learn how one disability provider collaborated with an institution-wide writing initiative to increase access and success for students with invisible disabilities using best practices in teaching writing to students with learning disabilities and ADHD.

Audience: Intermediate

Promoting and Demonstrating Universal Design on our Campuses

#6.8 Abuse of College Students with Disabilities: Heightening Awareness through an Education Session

Patricia Findley, Rutgers University

Sara-Beth Plummer, Rutgers University

Individuals with disabilities are at particularly high risk for abuse through physical, sexual, and emotional violence, as well as financial- and disability-related exploitation and mistreatment. This presentation will provide the results of a study conducted of the related experiences of students with disabilities at a large university and will present a single educational session that can be inserted into various course curricula to heighten awareness on the issue.

Audience: Intermediate

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#6.9 Foreign Language Learning: Using Research and Evidence-Based Practices to Inform Accommodation Decision-Making

Sally Scott, University of Mary Washington

Manju Banerjee, University of Connecticut

Determining accommodations for students with difficulty in foreign language learning continues to confound postsecondary service providers. When is a course substitution warranted? When is classroom accommodation sufficient? Are there accommodations that are unique to foreign language learning? This session highlights research and evidence based practices for accommodation decision-making including the use of key indicators within disability documentation.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#6.10 Collaborations Among Campuses to Foster Professional Development and Ease Processes for Students

Caitlyn McCandless, The Ohio State University

Kera Manley, Otterbein University

Christopher Keck, Columbus State Community College

The goal of this session is to discuss how collaborations between campuses can foster professional development and ease processes for students. College students are changing; the New York Times reports that one in three students is a transfer from another school. We will discuss how strong bonds between campuses can make these transitions smoother for students and staff alike.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education

#6.11 The Impact of the Cloud on Higher Education

Doug Rosette, Texthelp Systems Inc.

Attend this session to learn the implications and issues associated with the implementation of Cloud-based technologies in higher education. See hands-on demonstrations of new AT applications that harness the power of the Cloud and allow use across multiple devices and platforms. Bring your questions and hear how higher education institutions and their students are using these new technologies in the Cloud.

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Techonologies

pepnet 2 - #6.12 Remedial Computer Software for College-Age Deaf Students

Norman Crozer, Pierce College

Participants will get an overview of six Windows-based computer programs that teach English to college-age deaf students. The programs are mostly self contained and can be used alone or on a network. The intended audience for this presentation is novice, intermediate, and expert postsecondary professionals. No computer experience is required for the participants or for students who use the software.

Audience: Intermediate

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pepnet 2 - #6.13 DESIGN Options for Accessible Distance Education

Michelle Swaney, pn2 – University of Tennessee at Knoxville

In today’s growing online learning environment, institutions are creating online programs in order to increase enrollment. Programs that are delivered online create challenges and barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing participants, the program, and the Office of Disability Services. This presentation will discuss several online platforms and possible DESIGN approaches providing accessibility for Deaf and Hard of Hearing students.

Audience: Intermediate/some experience

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pepnet 2 - #6.14 Improving Post-School Outcomes for Students with Hearing Impairments: Creating a Predictor Model to Develop a Transition Education Framework

Jennifer Coyle, NSTTAC

Results of a study that analyzed the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 (NLTS2) data and the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC) in-school predictors of post-school success will be shared. This research identified if students with hearing impairments are being provided access to the NSTTAC predictors and if they are, which predictors had an effect on their post-school employment and education outcomes.

Audience: All

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Concurrent Block 7

Thursday, July 12, 2012 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

#7.1 Learning Ally Making Reading Accessible for All

Stephanie Turner, LearningAlly, Inc.

LearningAlly formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic has a new online design, and a host of new features and products. Join this hands-on walk-through of the website to learn how to best assist your students. In addition, this session will gather feedback from users of assistive technology and commercial devices to assist us in future product development of hybrid books containing human audio and synthesized audio.

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#7.2 OUT OF THE BOX! It’s My Privilege to Serve You: Exploring the Role of Power and Privilege in Our Work

Melanie Thornton, University of Arkansas CURRENTS

Many of us are drawn to service work because of our commitment to creating more socially just and inclusive environments. If we are to be effective in that goal, it is important that we enter into the work with a reflective posture. We must recognize that we too can become a part of the problem--inadvertently contributing to the forces that maintain the status quo. We will explore the concepts of power and privilege, examine ways in which DS professionals may be personally advantaged by the current service model, and consider actions that serve to move us toward the vision of inclusion. This will be a conversational format in which everyone participates.

Audience: Novice

#7.3 DOJ’s 2010 Regulations - The 2010 Standards Now Apply to your Campus – What they Mean for Existing Facilities, Alterations, New Construction and You (Part 3 of 3)

James Bostrom, US Department of Justice

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

This session explores key issues for higher education – barrier removal and program accessibility, alterations, new construction, and the twists and turns that apply to housing, pools, assembly areas, ATMs, and other key campus spaces -- from the perspective of an attorney and an architect.

Audience: All

The Impact of Law on Practice

#7.4 Disability Awareness in Higher Education: An Experience from University of Indonesia

Dini Widinarsih, Curtin University

Disability awareness is one of the most important elements of effectively promoting an inclusive society for people with disabilities in the Asian and Pacific region. This presentation describes our struggle to develop disability awareness in higher education institutions in Indonesia where disability is still invisible in policy and academic discourse.

Audience: All

Multi-cultural and International Perspectives on Disability

#7.5 Applying for Testing Accommodations: Tips from the Experts Behind the Curtain

Loring Brinkerhoff, Educational Testing Service

Ruth Loew, Educational Testing Service

At the 2005 AHEAD conference, ETS staff presented, to a packed house, an overview of the accommodations request process. Much has changed since 2005, including streamlined procedures and updated documentation guidelines. This presentation, therefore, will be a “how to” session on applying for testing accommodations targeted at DSS coordinators and focusing on the updated procedures under the ADA AA.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#7.6 Disability Dynamics in the Student Veteran Community

Amanda Kraus, University of Arizona

Using data from University of Arizona’s Disabled Veterans Reintegration and Education Project, this presentation will discuss concepts that shape how veterans think about disability, share findings on veteran identity, and consider implications for practice within higher education and disability services. This grant project concludes in summer 2012; this presentation will share culminating themes, best practices, and avenues for future research.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#7.7 Between and Within: Collaborative by Design

Donna Johnson, University of Minnesota

Tammy Berberi, University of Minnesota at Morris

Nancy Cheeseman, University of Minnesota at Morris

Linda Wolford, University of Minnesota

Discover how two campuses within the University of Minnesota system are creating sustainable structures to leverage resources, develop allies, and work collaboratively between and within campuses using Disability Studies as a framework. Take away practical suggestions for how campus Disability Services offices may work together to build capacity leverage resources, and collaborate to promote access for students with disabilities.

Audience: All

Promoting and Demonstrating Universal Design on our Campuses

#7.8 Creating a disABILITY Advocate Program: Developing Ready, Willing, and Able Partners

Emily Shryock, The University of Texas at Austin

Justin Rogers, The University of Texas at Austin

The disABILITY Advocate Program is an educational program designed to create a more sensitive and inclusive environment for people with disabilities at your institution. Learn how to design, market, and implement a program that will motivate students, faculty, and staff to be advocates for people with disabilities. Delivered by Services for Students with Disabilities at The University of Texas.

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#7.9 The Focus Group: A Strategic Tool for Guiding Service Delivery and Enhancing Partnerships

Susan Aase, University of Minnesota

Barbara Blacklock, University of Minnesota

Through lecture and interactive/experiential demonstrations, this session will provide practical information on the benefits and challenges of using focus groups to guide effective service delivery and partnerships. Participants will learn about how to prepare and conduct focus groups, as well as, evaluate and use the information obtained from the focus group process to guide effective service delivery and enhance partnerships.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#7.10 Getting the College Community to Participate in your Disability Workshop

Kirsten Behling, Suffolk University

Are your workshops for faculty, staff and students on the topic of disabilities poorly attended? Join us for an interactive, self-reflecting workshop that is hugely successful in engaging participants on the topic of disability. You will participate in the workshop and be given all materials for replication on your campus.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education

#7.11 International Perspective on Access Services

Bea Awoniyi, AHEAD Membership Development Standing Committee for International Engagement

AHEAD members representing select parts of the world will participate in this interactive panel discussion to illuminate the meaning of access services and support for individuals with disabilities. Panel members will discuss the laws that guide services in their individual countries, culture and access to education in general, and the role of disability service professionals in their individual different counties.

Audience: All

pepnet 2 - #7.12 Beyond the Audiogram: Determining Reasonable Accommodations for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

Daniel “Dann” Trainer, University of Minnesota

Disability Service providers often determine accommodations for deaf and/or hard of hearing students based on the decibel loss indicated in the audiogram. This could lead to a superficial understanding of the functional limitations students face. An in-depth analysis of a student’s history and experiences in educational environments must also be considered. Additional considerations for assessing accommodations and accommodation options will be discussed.

Audience: Novice/All

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pepnet 2 - #7.13 Transition Success Measures for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in California

Dr. Nancylynn Ward, California Department of Education

Lucinda Aborn, Cerritos College

A Gallaudet University doctoral dissertation researched the California students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing transition success outcomes. The presentation will review the research findings of both residential and mainstreamed programs. Three major findings of the research impacting Deaf and Hard of Hearing students: 1. Transition Planning models 2. Role of the Transition Team 3. Transition Services Survey Instrument

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #7.14 The Design of DHH Support Services: 1992-2012 In Retrospect

Naomi Sheneman, Network Interpreting Service, Inc

This presentation will give a historical overview how the DHH support services have changed over the past 20 years. There will be a focus on legal obligations for access, demographics of DHH students, accommodations, coordination of services, availability of resources and attitude. The current perspectives and future implications will be covered as well.

Audience: Intermediate/Some

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Concurrent Block 8

Friday July 13, 2012 9:00 am - 10:30 am

#8.1 Explore What Makes the ClockWork Database Scheduler Tick!

Barouch Chai, Microcomputer Science Centre, Inc.

Randy Borst, University at Buffalo

Holly Johnson, University at Buffalo

Mike Dinunzio, Technopro

The ClockWork Database Scheduler is a secure, multi-purpose scheduling and tracking database system currently in use in many colleges and universities throughout Canada and the US. In this hands-on session, learn how counselors and student services streamline management systems of their accessibility departments through this simple-to-use, yet powerful software.

Audience: Intermediate

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#8.2 OUT OF THE BOX! Achieving Effective Outreach and Systemic Change Through Strategic Collaborations

Susan A. Aase, University of Minnesota

Amanda Kraus, University of Arizona

Meghan Sooy, University of Arizona

Donna Johnson, University of Minnesota

Disability resource professionals cannot achieve truly accessible campuses by working only with individual students and situations. Strong partnerships and shared efforts are needed to establish access, in its broadest sense, as a campus-wide initiative. If effective outreach and systemic change are to occur, collaboration and capacity-building strategies are needed to build inclusion into the fabric of the institution, whatever its size. Through presentation and discussion, presenters will provide multiple examples of strategic, collaborative relationships with various campus constituencies. Participants will take home ideas for conceptualizing, developing, implementing and evaluating collaborations and partnerships on their respective campuses.

Audience: Novice

#8.3 AHEAD’s Updated Guidance on Reasonable Documentation

AHEAD Board and Leadership

In response to the changing landscape following passage of the ADA Amendments Act in 2008, AHEAD has updated its guidance on disability documentation. This session will familiarize you with the new 2012 guidelines from AHEAD, give you suggestions for transitioning to documentation expectations consistent with the spirit as well as the letter of the ADAAA, and orient you to a heightened focus on determining reasonable accommodations rather than deciding if a person has a disability.

Audience: All

The Impact of Law on Practice

#8.4 Advising Students with Learning Disabilities in Study Abroad

Ashley Bryant, Mobility International USA

Kathy Schwartz, American University

Students with learning disabilities are significantly more likely to study abroad than students with any other type of disability. Are study abroad programs effectively accommodating these students overseas? A disability support director, a professional from a national organization, and a study abroad alumna with a learning disability will present on arranging accommodations, designing for inclusion, understanding international perspectives, and other considerations.

Audience: All

Multi-cultural and International Perspectives on Disability

#8.5 Facilitating Successful Transitions to College: Implications from the Common Core State Standards

Roberta Wohle, Fairleigh Dickinson University

Despite the increased enrollment of individuals with disabilities in postsecondary programs, many students struggle to complete their college education. Insufficient “academic college readiness” appears to be one factor contributing to poor retention rates. This workshop will introduce participants to the potential impact of the recently adopted Common Core State Standards on preparing “all” students for the academic demands of college.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#8.6 Undressing Normal: The Applicability of UnConference Formats to Disability Studies and Services

Kathy Sheppard-Jones, University of Kentucky

Bev Harp, University of Kentucky

The democratic tenets of the “unconference” format make it an ideal tool for including individuals with developmental disabilities in discussions normally conducted in the academic realm. Presenters from the University of Kentucky’s Human Development Institute will share the results of a recent unconference on disability and sexuality, and will offer strategies for hosting successful action-oriented events based on this model.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#8.7 Effective Math Learning Strategies/Accommodations for LD, TBI, ADHD and Wounded Warriors Students

Paul Nolting, State College of Florida

Participants will learn how processing deficits affect math learning for students with LD, TBI, ADHD and PTSD. Presenters will recommend appropriate math classroom accommodations, testing accommodations and course substitutions in addition to discussing ways in which these students can acquire and use appropriate math study skills. Further discussion will take place on how to recruit and help wounded warriors pass math.

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#8.8 An Investigation of the Enrollment Patterns and Graduation Rates of College Students with ADHD and/or LD

Theresa E. L. Maitland, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

More students with ADHD and/or LD are now attending college. However, there is limited research detailing how their experiences differ from the general study body. This session will share the results of a study comparing enrollment and graduation data from 2000 students diagnosed with ADHD and/or LD with 9000 of their non-disabled peers

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#8.9 Beyond Access: Self-Advocacy is a Measurable DS outcome (That You Need)!

Gavin Steiger, Trinity University

Mikael Snitker-Magin, Ferris State University

While self-advocacy is touted among DS professionals, the assessment of self-advocacy and related learning outcomes is often regarded as a desirable but ancillary function of DS offices. However, facilitating student self-advocacy skills can be a powerful tool to promote the effectiveness of services within the context of institutional goals such as retention, student achievement, and campus diversity.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#8.10 Visual Social Thinking Techniques, How to Leverage the Visual Thinker’s Strengths

Michael McManmon, College Internship Program

Oliver West, Footnotes Visual Thinking Program

Margaret Dillon Katz, College Internship Program

Discover innovative strength-based techniques for visual thinkers, bringing together social thinking & visual thinking. Many people think in pictures or visual terms and not in written words, yet schools have not yet appropriately tapped into this strength. Learn how to leverage the visual learners strengths as a tool for social learning and note-taking in school and work. Learn visual techniques which are effective tools for innovative thinking, social thinking, and retention of ideas and concepts. Be prepared to try and practice this technique at this session.

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#8.11 “There’s An App For That!” A Look at Some Apple iPad (tm) Educational Apps

Deanna Arbuckle, University of Dayton

As technology changes, so do the needs of our students. With the increase in use of mobile devices such as the iPhone or iPad, DS providers need to adapt to “apps”. This presentation will define apps and highlight some apps for note-taking, time management, concept mapping, text-to-speech and reading. A list of apps will be available for download.

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#8.12 Supporting Successful Transfers: Building Understanding between Two and Four-Year Institutions

Terri Rodriguez, Quinsigamond Community College

This year-long project was initiated to understand the needs of students with disabilities as they persisted to graduation and then transfer onto a four-year college/university. This presentation will highlight: current transfer themes, the research design and results from the project, and emphasize the importance of creating relationships between two-year and four-year institutions in order to provide a seamless transfer.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#8.13 Video Accessibility: Penn State University Demonstrates its Closed Captioning Solution

Keith Bailey, Penn State University

Tole Khesin, 3Play Media

Josh Miller, 3Play Media

Although online video is becoming the dominant medium in education, closed captioning is rare - even though it is a necessity for deaf users and an essential aid for ESL students. Captioning is often perceived as obtrusive and expensive, but in this session, Penn State University will demonstrate a cost-effective, streamlined captioning workflow that provides push-button simplicity for instructors campus-wide.

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

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Concurrent Block 9

Friday July 13, 2012 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

#9.1 Fostering Independence and Inclusion via Assistive Technology and Universal Design: Students Acquiring a College Education and Competing in the Workforce Using the Most Innovative Technologies Available Part 1 of 2

Diana Petschauer, University of New Hampshire

A comprehensive, hands-on overview of the latest innovative assistive technology programs and devices available and being utilized by students in post-secondary education. Demonstrations of Text-to-Speech software & Screen readers with study skills features, voice recognition, magnification software & tools, Smartpen, DAISY converters & readers, as well as Math editors & scientific instruments that make science accessible to students who have various disabilities. New apps for the iPad & iPhone will also be demonstrated, for mind-mapping, dictation, scheduling, notetaking, audio-recording, & more!

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#9.2 OUT OF THE BOX! Getting Connected: Opportunities for Leadership within AHEAD

AHEAD Board Members and Leadership

New professionals and first-time conference attendees often struggle to establish a network of colleagues and may be frustrated in identifying ways to become actively involved professionally. Likewise, AHEAD itself has often struggled in its goal to find and groom diverse, new leaders. If you would like to learn more about AHEAD and opportunities for involvement and leadership, join AHEAD’s current leaders for a discussion of the Association, its goals and future.

Audience: Novice to Intermediate

#9.3 Cases and Cautions: How Legal Happenings Are Shaping the Online Learning Environment Part 1 of 2

Jane Jarrow, DAIS and DCCOL

Kelly Hermann, Empire State College SUNY

PART ONE OF TWO : From the Kindle (tm) lawsuit, through the Dear Colleague letters, to complaints against Florida State and others, the future of disability and accommodation in online learning seems destined to be defined by legal action, rather than evolution. What really happened, and how does it foreshadow the future? This session will help you answer the question, “but what do we do now?!?”

Audience: All

The Impact of Law on Practice

#9.4 Five Steps To Welcome Students With Service Animals to On-Campus Residential Communities

Jacqueline Wilson, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Welcoming students with service animals to residential communities on campus requires that stakeholders work together. This presentation will provide a 5-step approach that will equip administrators to create the partnerships necessary in providing a supportive one-stop-shop service to students requesting service animal support on campus. Strategies to enlist buy-in from campus partners, students, families, and community members will be discussed.

Audience: All

The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#9.5 Campus and Student Self-Evaluation Matrix: Tools for Better Transitions and AT Support in Higher Education

Bryan Ayres, Technology and Curriculum Access Center

Janet Peters, Great Lakes ADA Center

The Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology in Post Secondary Education comprise on-line tools available to improve assistive technology transitions from K-12 education to post-secondary education for students with disabilities and disability support services. This session will explore using the campus and student self-evaluation matrix to provide better post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#9.6 [SESSION CANCELLED] Equalizing Higher Education: Interpreting Legal Accommodations Requirements Through a Disability Studies Lens

Ashley Taylor, Syracuse University

Equalizing higher education for students with disabilities means interpreting accommodations through a disability studies lens. Yet the prevailing understanding of accommodations is that they compensate for students’ deficits, rather than equalize their opportunities for academic success. This presentation will discuss, through concrete examples, why the perspective from which we interpret “reasonable accommodations” matters greatly to students’ academic and social inclusion.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#9.7 Implementing a Social Model of Disability Approach to Service Delivery

Heather Mole, McGill University

This session will focus on the shift that some disability resource centers are making towards a social model of disability approach to service delivery. The presenter, a DS staff member, will present findings from research about the key characteristics of these services; including Universal Design and documentation policies. Participants will engage in discussion about implementation in their own service.

Audience: Intermediate

Promoting and Demonstrating Universal Design on Our Campuses

#9.8 Preparing Student Veterans with Disabilities for Success: A Resource Module for DR/S Coordinators

Jessica Queener, HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth Transitions Center

Elizabeth Shook Torres, The George Washington University-doctoral candidate

As postsecondary institutions report higher numbers of student veterans with disabilities, it is imperative that Disability Resources/Services (DR/S) Coordinators have the necessary resources to meet the needs of these students. This presentation will introduce “Preparing Student Veterans with Disabilities for Success,” a new module that will provide DR/S Coordinators with imperative information for providing effective services to student veterans.

Audience:

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions; The Emergence of New Trends, Populations, and Practices

#9.9 Exploring Microsoft Sharepoint (tm) for Streamlining Alt Text Processes While Investigating Accessibility

Patti Lester, Florida State University

KimBoo York, Florida State University

Growing an Alt text program can easily become cumbersome, unwieldy, and overwhelming. Microsoft Sharepoint claims to offer a solution of customized work flows that can be subsequently tailored to fit expanding needs. This presentation discusses a case study of the implement of Microsoft Sharepoint with considerations of accessibility, scalability, process automation and work flow procedures.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#9.10 Who Are You Now? The Reintegration of Brain Injury Survivors in Academia

Dede Norungolo, Clemson University

As more students enter or return to school following brain injury, this presentation will address how social, emotional and cognitive adjustments can be encouraged through Disability Services (DS) offices in partnership with campus and community resources to support student reintegration into academia. The session will cover reintegration planning, self-awareness and self-advocacy aspects of life with brain injury. The presentation will also address, through interactive exercises, individual understanding of what it means to have sustained a brain injury.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education

#9.11 Implementing Universal Design Strategies to Improve Course Completion and Retention (Part 1 of 2)

Debra Hart, ICI, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Molly Boyle, ICI, University of Massachusetts, Boston

This session will share the research results from a study at 6 community colleges in Massachusetts that addressed the low retention and completion rates of students with disabilities. Strategies for building a campus-wide universal design team, training faculty to integrate Universal Course Design (UCD) principles into those courses will be shared with hands-on activities.

Audience: All

pepnet 2 - #9.12 Growing Your Own: Mentoring New Support Service Providers in the Postsecondary Environment, Part 1

Cindy Camp, pn2 – Jacksonville State University

Chri Skoczynski, pn2 – University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Interpreting or captioning in postsecondary environments presents unique demands; however, it is sometimes difficult for colleges to find seasoned service providers. This presentation will address the issues of finding and maintaining qualified staff from three different perspectives: a large program with many resources; a medium sized program with limited options; and small, isolated campuses with many challenges.

Audience: Intermediate/Some Experience

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pepnet 2 - #9.13 Beyond the Classroom

Carol Funckes, University of Arizona

Melanie Thornton, University of Arkansas CURRENTS

Higher education is so much more than what is taught in the classroom. From study abroad programs to intramural activities to student government, we value co-curricular opportunities as essential components of the holistic, transformative act of learning at the postsecondary level. Following-up on pn2’s plenary student panel, we will explore the role of the DS professional in creating a culture in which funding does not compromise Deaf and hard of hearing students’ comprehensive college experience.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #9.14 Characteristics of Postsecondary Graduates who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Part 1 of 2

Amy Hebert, Ph.D. (ABD), CRC, NIC (independent contractor)

This workshop is targeted to disability service providers, deaf educators, vocational rehabilitation counselors, postsecondary interpreters, and professionals in the field of deafness who are interested in enhancing their knowledge of new approaches to retention. Participants will explore current research that investigated the attributes of successful college graduates in a national sample of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Audience: All

pepnet 2

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Concurrent Block 10

Friday July 13, 2012 3:15 pm - 4:15 pm

#10.1 Fostering Independence and Inclusion via Assistive Technology and Universal Design: Students Acquiring a College

Education and Competing in the Workforce Using the Most Innovative Technologies Available Part 2 of 2

Diana Petschauer, University of New Hampshire

A comprehensive, hands-on overview of the latest innovative assistive technology programs and devices available and being utilized by students in post-secondary education. Demonstrations of Text-to-Speech software & Screen readers with study skills features, voice recognition, magnification software & tools, Smartpen, DAISY converters & readers, as well as Math editors & scientific instruments that make science accessible to students who have various disabilities. New apps for the iPad & iPhone will also be demonstrated, for mind-mapping, dictation, scheduling, notetaking, audio-recording, & more!

Audience: All

Eliminating Barriers Through Access Technologies

#10.2 OUT OF THE BOX What’s Left? What’s Next?

Sue Kroeger, University of Arizona

Adam Meyer, Eastern Michigan University

Sharon Downs, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Heather Mole, McGill University

Join the Out of the Box! presenters and your colleagues for a final wrap-up and debrief of the week. You will have an opportunity to discuss unanswered questions, pose head-scratching scenarios, synthesize new learning and apply concepts to day-to-day situations. We will discuss what’s next and plan for follow-up relationships that can provide a sounding board as you apply new concepts to your work.

Audience: Novice

#10.3 Cases and Cautions: How Legal Happenings Are Shaping the Online Learning Environment Part 2 of 2

Jane Jarrow, DAIS and DCCOL

Kelly Hermann, Empire State College SUNY

PART TWO OF TWO : From the Kindle (tm) lawsuit, through the Dear Colleague letters, to complaints against Florida State and others, the future of disability and accommodation in online learning seems destined to be defined by legal action, rather than evolution. What really happened, and how does it foreshadow the future? This session will help you answer the question, “but what do we do now?!?”

Audience: All

The Impact of Law on Practice

#10.4 Disability Awareness on Campus through Media

Caitlyn McCandless, The Ohio State University

Kera Manley, Otterbein University

Christopher Keck, Columbus State Community College

This session will give professionals the tools needed to teach students to examine biases, misconceptions, and myths associated with disability through an examination of media. We will offer a unique perspective which participants will be able to use on their campuses to engage this generation of college students.

Audience: All

Multi-cultural and International Perspectives on Disability

#10.5 Increasing Achievement and Transition Outcomes through Student Learning Communities and Ability Advising

Alexa Murray, The Ohio State University

Ohio’s STEM Ability Alliance (OSAA) recruits STEM students with disabilities and assists them complete STEM degrees and transition to the STEM workforce. OSAA has identified five barriers that student with disabilities pursuing STEM education/careers encounter: Motivation, academic preparation, personal skills, learning/reasoning skills and opportunity. Our model integrates best-practice interventions to overcome these barriers for STEM students with disabilities.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions

#10.6 Characters with Disabilities in Contemporary Fiction: Positive Portrayals

Edith Miller, Delta Alpha Pi International Honor Society

Julianne Albiero-Walton, East Stroudsburg University

This presentation examines the positive, non-stereotyped portrayal of characters with disabilities in contemporary fiction by discussing several examples the presenters have discovered and enjoyed. Session participants are requested to bring their own examples to discuss so that we may begin to compile a bibliography of such fiction.

Audience: All

The Influence of Disability Studies in the Work of Disability Services

#10.7 Evaluating BREAKTHRU - A STEM Virtual Learning Environment

Gerri Wolfe, University of Georgia

BREAKTHRU combines social networking and virtual communities to encourage students with disabilities to pursue STEM majors. This presentation demonstrates a virtual learning and support environment. Students engage using Avatars to access virtual mentoring, academic, transition, and research assistance. BREAKTHRU, is a five-year NSF-funded program lead by the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech.

Audience: All

Promoting and Demonstrating Universal Design on Our Campuses

#10.8 Building Alliance: A Design for System Change that Support Students with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

Deborah Zuver, CIDD - University of North Carolina

Monica Isbell, Alamance Community College

Kelly Kelley, Western Carolina University

Nance Longworth, Davidson College

The panel provides a rich forum to address next steps for a successful DS role that serves students with intellectual/developmental disabilities. Participants will discover how collaboration informs the DS role in developing options and supporting students, reinforcing the richness of a diverse, inclusive campus environment. Panel presenters include cofacilitators of the North Carolina Postsecondary Education Alliance and NC AHEAD leaders.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education

#10.9 A New Approach to the Role of Technology in Disability Services

Amanda Niguidula, Florida International University

Gabriela Alvarez, Florida International University

As the explosion of online learning creates new challenges and opportunities for the Disability Services Office we will take you through the steps of how you can you create an action plan that takes you out of the accommodation rut and into the role of design consultant. Identify tools to better serve students with disabilities while also pioneering new and engaging ways to support student success.

Audience: All

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#10.10 Demystifying Law School: A Review of Policy, Practices, and Best Outcomes

Lisa Ferreira, Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Diane Alkais, Phoenix School of Law

Angela Bayne, Thomas Jefferson School of Law

When law school appears mysterious and disclosure presents perceived barriers for students with disabilities, advisors need to provide effective guidance. This panel will discuss the unique culture of law school including the Law School Admission Test, admission, accommodations in law school, and the bar examination. Panelist will share scenarios and discuss best practices from admission to the bar examination.

Audience: All

Facilitating Successful Academic and Vocational Transitions; Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education;

Effective, Strategic, and Innovative DS Office Management

#10.11 Implementing Universal Design Strategies to Improve Course Completion and Retention (Part 2 of 2)

Debra Hart, ICI, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Molly Boyle, ICI, University of Massachusetts, Boston

This session will share the research results from a study at 6 community colleges in Massachusetts that addressed the low retention and completion rates of students with disabilities. Strategies for building a campus-wide universal design team, training faculty to integrate Universal Course Design (UCD) principles into those courses will be shared with hands-on activities.

Audience: All

Creating and Maintaining Partnerships for Inclusive Education

pepnet 2 - #10.12 Growing Your Own: Mentoring New Support Service Providers in the Postsecondary Environment, Part 2

Cindy Camp, pn2 – Jacksonville State University

Chris Skoczynski , pn2 - University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Interpreting or captioning in postsecondary environments presents unique demands; however, it is sometimes difficult for colleges to find seasoned service providers. This presentation will address the issues of finding and maintaining qualified staff from three different perspectives: a large program with many resources; a medium sized program with limited options; and small, isolated campuses with many challenges.

Audience: Intermediate/Some Experience

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pepnet 2 - #10.13 Study Abroad & Sign Language Interpreting: Promising Practice & Roundtable Discussion Study Abroad

Barb Borich, University of Arizona

Lauren Kinast, University of Texas at Austin

This session is intended as a vehicle for exploring successful practice related to supporting interpreting as an accommodation for study abroad experiences. Presenters have extensive experience consulting with students, interpreters and administrators to identify unique challenges and solutions for a variety of study abroad programs. Join us for a facilitated discussion regarding: locating and contracting interpreters, travel logistics and funding.

Audience: All

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pepnet 2 - #10.14 Characteristics of Postsecondary Graduates who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Part 2 of 2

Amy Hebert, Ph.D. (ABD), CRC, NIC (independent contractor)

This workshop is targeted to disability service providers, deaf educators, vocational rehabilitation counselors, postsecondary interpreters, and professionals in the field of deafness who are interested in enhancing their knowledge of new approaches to retention. Participants will explore current research that investigated the attributes of successful college graduates in a national sample of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Audience: All

pepnet 2