2016 Management & TRiO Institutes

Additional Resources

 

The Association on Higher Education And Disability (AHEAD) presents the 2016 Management & TRiO Institutes

 

February 3 – 5, 2016 Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel Phoenix, Arizona USA

 

AHEAD invites you to join us in warm Phoenix, Arizona to meet with colleagues and learn best practices for disability resources and services from expert instructors.

Now in its 10th year the acclaimed AHEAD Management Institutes offer managers, directors and other professionals in postsecondary education a chance to gain knowledge and skills in an intimate and hands-on learning setting. We’ve included workshops of interest to administrators, faculty, and academic skills personnel, as well as disability services staff.

Each attendee will choose one of the workshops below to attend Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of the Institute

 

NEW for 2016! Workshops begin at 1:00 pm on Wednesday, February 3rd and end at 12:00 pm on Friday, February 5th to maximize your travel time.

  • Institute #1: AHEAD Start: The Institute for New and Newer Disability Services Managers
  • Institute #2: Managing Resources and Services for Students in Health Science and Professional Education
  • Institute #3: AHEAD TRiO Institute - Students with Learning Disabilities, ADHD, Psychological Disabilities, and Those on the Autism Spectrum: Best Practices in TRiO Programs
  • Institute #4: Introduction to Disability Law for DS Professionals

 

 

Advance registration for this event is now closed. There will be very limited availability for registration onsite in Phoenix. If you intend to register onsite, please contact Jane Johnston at Jane@ahead.org to inquire about availability.

 

 

Institute #1: AHEAD Start: Setting the Landscape for New Professionals Wednesday, February 3, 2016 1:00 pm– 6:00 pm (4 hrs, 40 mins direct instruction) Thursday, February 4, 2016 8:30 am – 6:00 pm (6 hrs, 40 mins of direct instruction) Friday, February 5, 2016 9:00 am – 12:00 am (2 hrs, 40 mins direct instruction)

Carol Funckes-University of Arizona

Designed specifically for disability resource professionals who are new to the field, this two-day preconference session offers a comprehensive overview of the issues that shape postsecondary disability services. No longer only a service office for students, the disability resource office is an vital center of information, collaboration, and technical assistance for the campus community. Higher education administrators, faculty, and students rely on disability resource personnel to provide effective consultation and services to lead the institution in creating inclusive, welcoming campus environments.

Through lecture, discussion, and resource sharing, we will explore how legal principles and philosophical constructs intersect with the practical realities of working in higher education disability services today. We will discuss strategies for moving our campuses beyond a compliance narrative and provide the opportunity for participants to develop a professional network and find confidence in their dual role of service provider and campus consultant. Topics to be covered include:

  • basics of disability service in higher education, including foundational legal concepts, perspectives of disability, the power of design, and lessons from history and disability studies;
  • promising approaches for using interview and a variety of forms of information, including third-party documentation, to assess barriers and plan individual accommodations;
  • strategies for designing service delivery practices that minimize extra efforts by disabled students and frame problems of access as resulting from poorly designed environments;
  • the institution-wide role of the disability resource office in collaborating and consulting on physical, curricular, policy, and information access;
  • office management: record keeping, budgeting and resource management, and program review and assessment.

Audience: Novice

Institute #2: Managing Resources and Services for Students in Health Science and Professional Education Wednesday, February 3, 2016 1:00 pm– 6:00 pm (4 hrs, 40 mins direct instruction) Thursday, February 4, 2016 8:30 am – 6:00 pm (6 hrs, 40 mins of direct instruction) Friday, February 5, 2016 9:00 am – 12:00 am (2 hrs, 40 mins direct instruction)

Lisa Meeks-University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine Elisa Laird-Metke-Samuel Merritt University

Schools that offer health science programs, including Medical, Nursing, Dental, Pharmacy, Physical or Occupational Therapy, Physician Assistant, or other programs, face unique challenges when creating reasonable accommodations for health science and professional students with disabilities including the lock-step nature of most programs, accommodations in the didactic vs clinical settings, meeting technical standards, the competitive nature of admissions and disclosure, proactive planning to avoid clinical year issues. This lively presentation will provide examples of complex accommodation requests and demonstrate models for decision-making and implementation through interactive discussions and group activities. Complex topics will be addressed through a combination of workshops, lectures, round-table discussions, deconstructing previous OCR cases and working through various scenarios based on real-life cases. Throughout the three days, relevant OCR decisions and court cases will be discussed, and plenty of time for Q&A will be provided.

This training will provide management guidance for new or experienced Disability Service practitioners in many areas particular to health science programs, including:

  • a practical overview of the disability laws and how this applies to the health sciences, with particular attention to the role of faculty in the accommodation process, how disability laws affect health science technical standards, and balancing disability accommodations with patient safety concerns;
  • the interactive process that occurs between disability professionals, faculty, staff, and the student when determining reasonable accommodations in the clinical environment (such as clerkships, preceptorships, OSCEs, and other standardized patient activities);
  • how to identify when a potential accommodation may affect the integrity of the learning outcomes, compromise patient safety, or challenge technical standards;
  • the importance of having clear, written policies and procedures available to prospective students, as well as recently admitted and currently enrolled students, as well as tips for developing clear processes for faculty and staff (sample policies will be provided).
  • how to work with students and faculty regarding improving communication around disability related needs and implementing accommodations, with particular attention to students with disabilities that might impact their communication (e.g., Autism, Asperger’s, non-verbal learning disorder, psychological disabilities);
  • strategies for advising faculty and administrators who may instinctively slip from the role of faculty into their roles as a health care providers when working with students with disabilities;
  • “Busting” prevailing myths regarding students with disabilities in health science programs, including concerns about patient safety, requirements and standards, preparation for the real world of work and how to counter those when they arise;
  • how to advise students when applying for accommodations on licensing exams and how to support students who must appeal a denial of accommodations; and
  • disclosure in the health science field, the multi-layered concerns of students who will become providers.

Audience: All

Institute #3: AHEAD TRiO Institute - Students with Learning Disabilities, ADHD, Psychological Disabilities, and Those on the Autism Spectrum: Best Practices in TRiO Programs Wednesday, February 3, 2016 1:00 pm– 6:00 pm (4 hrs, 40 mins direct instruction) Thursday, February 4, 2016 8:30 am – 6:00 pm (6 hrs, 40 mins of direct instruction) Friday, February 5, 2016 9:00 am – 12:00 am (2 hrs, 40 mins direct instruction)

Rhonda H. Rapp-St. Mary’s University, Texas

TRiO programs and services make college possible for a wide variety of students, including those with non-apparent (“hidden”) disabilities. TRiO personnel need to understand the unique nature and features of these disabilities, and their impact on students’ academic, social, and work lives. Gaining knowledge and skill in this area will help TRiO staff to foster increased retention and graduation rates for these students.

Disability accommodations are largely the purview of Disabled Student Services offices. This professional development opportunity for TRiO personnel focuses on the strategies and methods necessary to improve the success rates of TRiO students with learning disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, psychological disabilities, and those on the autism spectrum.

During this intensive and highly interactive two-and-one-half-day institute, participants will receive in-depth information on disability characteristics, the impact of each disability on specific academic skills, and a look at how these disabilities may affect students’ social and career development. Strategies and tools that reflect current practice will be shared, demonstrated, and used during the workshop.

Attendees will leave the institute with the knowledge and resources necessary to begin implementing appropriate, improved and comprehensive TRiO services to their students with disabilities immediately!

Audience: Designed for TRiO personnel but other campus personnel are welcome.

Institute #4: Introduction to Disability Law for DS Professionals Wednesday, February 3, 2016 1:00 pm– 6:00 pm (4 hrs, 40 mins direct instruction) Thursday, February 4, 2016 8:30 am – 6:00 pm (6 hrs, 40 mins of direct instruction) Friday, February 5, 2016 9:00 am – 12:00 am (2 hrs, 40 mins direct instruction)

Jamie Axelrod-Northern Arizona University Paul Grossman-Hastings College of the Law, Retired Chief Regional Attorney, OCR, San Francisco Mary Lee Vance-University of California, Berkeley

This presentation will give DS professionals a comprehensive introduction to postsecondary disability law and establish a framework for answering the questions they encounter on a daily basis.

Knowledge of disability law in the higher education setting is an essential skill for all DS professionals. Hundreds of DS professional have initiated the development of this skill by attending the AHEAD two day preconference workshops on this topic. If you haven’t had the opportunity to do so, here it is! Taught by nationally-recognized disability law expert, Paul Grossman, J.D., the President-Elect of AHEAD and NAU DSS Director, Jamie Axelrod, and the UC Berkeley, Deputy DSS Director, Mary Lee Vance, Ph.D., this team will provide you with a legal and implementation framework for answering the questions that you encounter on a daily basis.

This institute will begin by placing the responsibilities of a DSS officer into its robust civil rights context, reinforcing the importance of a career in DSS services. We will learn what requirements all antidiscrimination laws share and what is unique to disability law. The presenters will provide an exploration of the practical implications of the ADAAA’s changes to the definition of disability and the implementing EEOC and DOJ regulations, as well as their relationship to the AHEAD Guidance on Documenting Accommodations and the just-concluded landmark settlement between DOJ and the Law School Admissions Counsel (LSAC).

As the law shifts emphasis from who is “an individual with a disability” to “qualification” how are the responsibilities of a DS Officer impacted? What must be done to make programs and facilities accessible to persons with disabilities? What accommodations are, or are not, required in the college and university setting. This will include an exploration of the digital world (websites, on-line learning and adaptive technology), testing accommodations, ticketing, mobility devices, and more. Brand new guidance concerning service animals and emotional support animals will be covered in depth. Special attention will be paid to two of the most challenging issues: field placements/internships and students with mental-health related disabilities including students who engage in self-destructive behavior.

Included in registration for this class is a copy of Colker and Grossman, The Law of Disability Discrimination for Higher Education Professionals. The content of this resource is well-aligned with the content of this class, comprehensively covering most major court decisions and Federal guidance pertaining to the definition of disability and disability discrimination law in the post-secondary setting. For those professionals who must advise their campuses on employment questions, this publication also contains a full chapter on employment discrimination with regard to disability.

Audience: All

AHEAD is applying for CEU pre-approval from the CRCC for this program.
General Certificates of Attendance will be available for use with other licensing agencies and employers.

 

 

Advance registration for this event is now closed. There will be very limited availability for registration onsite in Phoenix. If you intend to register onsite, please contact Jane Johnston at Jane@ahead.org to inquire about availability.