AHEAD 2010 IMAG related presentations and events:

Preconference:

#PC1 The AHEAD Institute on Accessible Curriculum Production
Ron Stewart, Chair, AHEAD Instructional Materials Accessibility Group
Gaeir Dietrich, DeAnza College
Edward McCoyd, American Association of Publishers
Building on the very popular AHEAD E-Text Institutes, this two day workshop will focus primarily on the conversion of publisher-provided source files. This workshop is designed for an intermediate to advanced audience and will build on the content of the prior training's. We will explore advanced management topics, dealing with publisher-produced content, the creation and archiving of content, and advanced editing techniques. Participants will develop expert alt format production and management techniques, become familiar with the use of a variety of tools for the creation and editing of digital curricular content, and learn advanced techniques for data storage and management. It is recommended that participants have participated in a prior AHEAD e-text training or equivalent, or discuss the content with the presenters prior to participating.
Audience: Intermediate to Advanced

Concurrent Sessions:

#1.1 Pulse Pen in Higher Education
Jayme Johnson, High Tech Center Training Unit, California Community Colleges
The Pulse Pen is an innovative combination of pen, audio recorder, and computer, that allows for efficient note taking, studying, and sharing in an online learning community. Using a sophisticated reference system to create a paper-based interface, the Pulse Pen can be used to capture audio and written information as well as an interactive playback and interface system. In addition to the traditional writing and reading via paper, the information can also be uploaded to a computer and further processed to provide alternate formats and multiple options for distribution and sharing content. In addition to being used as a note taking solution, the Pulse Pen also offers exciting capabilities as an instructional technology. Participants will learn about the Pulse Pen system and the various components, as well as how to use the Pulse Pen as a note taking accommodation. Strategies for effective note-taking will be discussed, and an overview of the online community will be provided to give a better understanding of how the Pulse Pen can be used in different contexts. Participants will learn how to use the Pulse Pen to create basic demos of functional programs, mathematic calculations, and foreign language translation, in addition to using the Pulse Pen to take notes and effectively interact with the notes in a study session.
Audience: Novice
AT Hands-On Lab

#2.1 Universally-Designed Course Materials
Jesse Hausler, Colorado State University
Marla Roll, Colorado State University
The Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) provides a convenient way to transport, view, and print electronic documents. PDF files are typically created in other applications like Microsoft Word and PowerPoint. They can also be produced by scanning the pages of a book or journal article. This session will focus on tools and techniques to assist faculty and other content creators in maximizing the accessibility of the PDF documents that they create. This session examines some of the features that make PDF documents more usable by a diverse audience. It also provides techniques for improving the accessibility of existing and new PDF documents.
Audience: Novice
AT Hands-On Lab

#2.13 Captioning Beyond Compliance: Making Today’s Media Format Accessible: YouTube, iTunes and Captured Lectures
Pat Brogan, Automatic Sync Technologies
Captioning is typically done as an accommodation for a specific student. This session explains the value of captioning beyond compliance for improved learning, and shows options for captioning. Special focus on captioning for popular media types like YouTube, iTunes and recorded lectures will be covered.
Audience: All
PEPNet

#3.8 The AccessText Network Update: Improving the Accessibility of College Textbooks
Christopher Lee, AccessText Network
Presenters will discuss and demonstrate the AccessText Network (ATN), an initiative of the Association of American Publishers, and give an update of their first year of operation. The ATN improves the accessibility of college textbooks by providing a simple, consistent method for a college’s disabled student service office to request and receive electronic files from the largest academic publishers in the country.
Audience: All
Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#3.14 “Remote Text Services” After You’ve Made the Decision
Philip Hyssong, Alternative Communication Services
Schools throughout the country are opting for remote text services for students with hearing loss. However, they are missing some key steps in understanding the process that is leading to disappointment and frustration. This workshop will allow participants to troubleshoot the toughest challenges and be ready for a successful remote text experience.
Audience: All
PEPNet

#4.1 Delivering Captioned Media: in iTunes U, YouTube, and Web Pages
Sean Keegan, Stanford University
Creating caption files is just one step to delivering captioned presentations. Integrating the caption file with the original media is another important step to ensure access to the final presentation. This hands-on presentation will identify different methods for including captions in the iTunes U, YouTube, and Web page environment as well as considerations for using accessible, Web-based media players.
Audience: Intermediate
AT Hands-On Lab  

#4.8 Success Strategies for Students with Learning and Attention
Challenges in STEM Courses
Heather Haeger, University of Arizona, SALT Center
Claudia Sandoval, University of Arizona, SALT Center
Jennifer Bell, University of Arizona
Many college students with learning disabilities struggle in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses and as a result, are steered away from majors in these fields. This interactive session will address issues affecting students in these courses and will outline strategies to improve student success in STEM classes and majors.
Audience: All
Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#4.10 Accessible Media Policies: A Canadian Model for Development, Implementation and Sustainability in Post-Secondary Institutions
Karen Walker, George Brown College
Anne Villahermosa, George Brown College
Effectively developing an accessible media policy in a postsecondary institution requires a model based on change, development and implementation strategies to sustain the use of universal design principles in learning environments. This session will illustrate the policy model used at one provincial college and how it can be adapted for use at other postsecondary institutions.
Audience: Intermediate
International Perspectives

#4.14 Delivering Remote Interpreting Services to Deaf Students in
Rural Areas
Barbara Keefe, PEPNet-Northeast
Lori Hutchison, PEPNet-Northeast
Joyce Gallagher, Owner, Sign Language Specialist of West Virginia
Lloyd Scott, Southwest Vermont Supervisory Union
Deaf students in rural areas are entitled to the same support services as their urban peers. Limited access to resources in remote regions of the country frequently compromise that expectation. Too often qualified interpreters are simply not available in these communities. Special education administrators are legally responsible for providing access to the curriculum for a student who is deaf. This panel of professionals will discuss the issues, and offer solutions to respond to this challenge.
Audience: All
PEPNet

#5.1 Foreign Language E-Text Production: Techniques and Considerations
Teresa Haven, Arizona State University
Although the workshop will discuss general e-text production techniques as part of its foundation, participants should already be familiar with the basics of this process. Beginners who do not yet have knowledge or experience of e-text production are encouraged to take the E-Text Institute in advance of this workshop. This workshop will build on the basics of e-text production in English to prepare participants to appropriately produce e-text in other languages. Considerations will include roman versus non-roman writing systems, diacritics, and how various access technologies may interface with the text. Participants will practice producing sample materials in various languages and experience using the materials with different types of access technology.
Audience: Intermediate
AT Hands-On Lab

#5.7 The 2008 Higher Education Opportunity Act: Implications for
Disability Services Offices
Wendy Harbour, Syracuse University
Debra Hart, University of Massachusetts, Boston
Judy Shanley, U.S. Department of Education
The 2008 Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) created an unprecedented level of federal involvement in postsecondary disability issues. Changes affect how campuses share information about disability services, access to college and financial aid for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and funding for research and development grants. This panel will share information about the HEOA and implications for disability services.
Audience: All
ADA@20 Years

#5.8 Learn How to Save Time and Money Acquiring Braille and
Electronic Textbooks.
Mike Bastine, Alternate Text Production Center
Sandy Greenberg, Alternate Text Production Center
Jaime Montgomery, Alternate Text Production Center
The Alternate Text Production Center (ATPC) will provide time and money saving ways to acquire alternative textbooks. New resources and services will be highlighted to attain Braille and Electronic Textbooks (E-Text) products. The ATPC will define quality Braille; Braille’s future in the classroom; and the Center’s new capabilities to fulfill textbook requests for students with print related disabilities.
Audience: All
Best Practices in Disability Services and Higher Education

#6.1 Real World Tools and Techniques for Accessible Instructional
Materials (AIM)
Ron Stewart, AltFormat Solutions LLC; Chair, AHEAD Instructional Materials Accessibility Group
One of the most problematic and significant issues facing the success of students with disabilities in today’s educational environment is the timely and efficient access to instructional materials and systems. This hands-on session will take a pragmatic look at tools that we have found most robust in the work of the AHEAD Instructional Materials Accessibility Group and will explore tools and techniques that have been developed to try and make the process more efficient and effective.
Audience: Novice
AT Hands-On Lab

#7.1 Tools for Accessing and Interacting with Graphics
Lucia Hasty, Rocky Mountain Braille Associates
Course content may require a student to determine the atomic weight of selenium from the Periodic Table of Elements, identify the major cities in each of the European Union countries, graph a series of equations, meet a project team in the main building of the science complex. What tools are available for the blind or visually impaired student to independently access and interact with this information? What tools support production of accessible media? Through hands-on lab activities, participants will become familiar with software/ hardware combinations that support both production of and access to graphic materials. Technology covered: Touch tablets, SmartPen adaptive applications, audible graphing calculator, TMAP Project, Duxbury Braille Translation and QuickTac for graphics, and other new technologies. Participants are encouraged to bring projects requested by students as examples for group problem-solving discussion.
Audience: Intermediate
AT Hands-On Lab

#8.1 Accessible Equations: Strategies for Alternate Formats with Math and Science
Sean Keegan, Stanford University
Authoring math and science content into alternate formats requires knowledge of math authoring tools, the limitations upon conversion, and the capabilities of the student to use different formats. This hands-on presentation will review different math authoring tools, including MathType and Scientific Notebook, and how these applications may be used to support the creation of math content in alternate formats.
Audience: Intermediate
AT Hands-On Lab

#9.1 Creating Accessible PDF Documents with MS Word and Acrobat Pro
Jayme Johnson, High Tech Center Training Unit, California Community Colleges
While it is generally easy to make an accessible PDF document, many people have never been taught the basic aspects of creating accessible information and therefore have little understanding of what needs to be done, much less how to go about doing it. This session will introduce you to the use of common “workhorses” MS Word and Acrobat Pro, and best practices for creating accessible electronic information with a minimum amount of stress or confusion.
Audience: All
AT Hands-On Lab