CONCURRENT SESSIONS

The AHEAD 2009 Conference offers a number of informative concurrent sessions
arranged in Topical Tracks. While you may choose any session that you’d
like, we offer these themes for those who want to explore particular topics in
depth. Words in italics after each description indicate the topical tracks and
areas.

Pre-selection of sessions you will attend is required. Please review the following
session information below or online, choose the one session during each block
that you will attend, and indicate those choices on your Conference Registration
Form.

Block1

Block2

Block3

Block4

Block5

Block6

Block7

Block8

Block9

CONCURRENT BLOCK ONE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22ND 11:30 AM-1:00 PM

#1.1 Paving the Road to DAISY - Creating Student Ready Accessible Materials

Ron Stewart, AHEAD

The DAISY standard is an open-source format for accessible digital audio books.
DAISY formatted material can be played on both software and hardware DAISY
players. We will show examples of players and demonstrate the ease with which
a DAISY talking book can be navigated and used. Participants will understand
the flexibility and usability of DAISY based curricular materials and will
develop a basic understanding of the production process

Audience: All

AT - Computer Lab

#1.2 Universal Design and Assistive Technology: A Holistic Approach to Post-secondary
Education Access


Sarah Jacobin, West Virginia University

Representatives of higher education and disability services staff may find
themselves “fixing” instructional barriers for students as problems
arise. Higher Education Access Program representatives will demonstrate a holistic
approach to provide access by highlighting methods to train faculty and administrators
on universal design practices, accessible information technology and assistive
technology.

Audience: All

AT-Lecture/Demo

#1.3 Reframing Disability for Equity and Inclusion

Sue Kroeger, University of Arizona

Disability activists and scholars have been asserting for more than three decades
that disability is socially constructed. However, this claim and its cultural/social
ramifications may be new and puzzling to many, including those of us in disability-related
service professions, who believe that our attitudes toward disability and our
work with disabled individuals are progressive. Service professionals, like
society, have been socialized to view disabled people as ‘tragic’,
deficient, and inferior. Professional practices are strongly criticized by
activists and scholars who view them as patronizing and oppressive. Our credibility
as disability-related professionals will be discredited further unless we are
willing to examine our own thinking and behavior. This presentation explores
society’s frame of disability as demonstrated in language, education,
media, design, and service delivery practices. It aims to generate questioning,
promote debate, and begin to translate scholarship into behavior change.

Audience: Novice

New DS Professionals

#1.4 Real Numbers and Implications for Interventions: The Prevalence of Disability
on Campus


Roger Smith, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Aura Hirschman, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


An analysis of students in a large Midwestern public university revealed actual
statistical data on the prevalence of students with functional impairments.
Most current statistics show 5 - 10% of students on a campus register as having
disabilities in order to receive accommodations. Whereas estimates are the
norm, this new data documents that the total number of students with disabilities
is more than twice this percentage. Replication and more student data have
the potential to influence policy change toward welcoming and more inclusive
campuses. Participants will learn techniques to overcome the challenges of
documenting actual numbers of students with disabilities on campuses and the
value of collecting this informative data, and how to use these statistics
to influence campus change.

Audience: Intermediate

Topics in Disability Services

#1.5 Riding a Tightrope: University Policies vs. Needs of Students with Chronic
Illness


Lynn Royster, DePaul University

Patricia Fennell, Albany Health Management Associates, Inc

Paula Kravitz, DePaul University


When students’ need for individualized accommodations to cope with unpredictable
illness conflict with institutional practices which view accommodations as
static, beginning-of-the-term offerings; emphasize standardization and rigid
adherence to timetables and activities; and ignore the fact that not all students
are able to share in traditional social activities, conflicts can arise. This
workshop highlights win-win ways to deal with this conflict and describes how
to create an environment in which more unconventional methods are accepted.
Participants will learn specific approaches to serving students with chronic
illnesses within the context of the requirements of postsecondary institutions.

Audience: All

Complex Issues: Introducing the Unfamiliar to the Underprepared

#1.6 What’s in a Name: Disability within Diversity

Ruth Warick, University of British Columbia

Janet Mee, University of British Columbia

Kelly Leonard, Purdue University


Diversity within disability is approached differently within institutions of
higher education. In this session various organizational frameworks for diversity
work relating to disability will be outlined and discussed, along with the
various philosophical frameworks that inform the work. One of the frameworks
will be the intersectional approach which recognizes that disability intersects
with race and ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientations and which is reflected
in an organizational structure that identifies disability within Access and
Diversity.

Audience: All

Diversity and Self-Identity

#1.7 Symposium: Israel’s Unique Response to Meet the Needs of
Adults with LD/ADHD in Higher Education Part I


Susan Vogel, Northern Illinois University

Guy Finkelstein, Association for the Advancement of Higher Education


In this three-part symposium offered on Wednesday of the conference participants
will learn how within 12 years one small group of determined professionals
created support services followed by sweeping legislative mandates to provide
accommodations in higher education employment.

In Part I the speaker will describe how a professional parent partnership inspired
the development and provision of support services, accommodations, and legislation
to meet the needs of university students with LD/ADHD.

Audience: All

International Law and Practice: Seeking Common Ground

#1.8 Symposium: Students with Disabilities in the STEM Majors

Midwest Alliance In Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
- Opportunities for Students with Disabilities

Jay K. Martin, University of Wisconsin, Madison


The Midwest Alliance in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
is an NSF-sponsored Alliance with the specific goal of increasing the numbers
of students with disabilities in post-secondary STEM education and careers.
This presentation will describe the activities of the Midwest Alliance and
the opportunities that exist for students with disabilities in STEM.

Captioning & Interpreting for STEM Students Using Cyberinfrastructure:
A Recommendation Report


E. William Clymer, NTID/RIT

James J. DeCaro, NTID/RIT


Online interpreting and captioning could be a major factor in the success of
deaf and hard-of-hearing STEM students at college. In June 2008, experts gathered
to consider the benefits, challenges and recommendations for future research,
development and evaluation of such services. This presentation will summarize
the findings of this NSF supported project and suggest some best practices.

Audience: All

Professional Competence: Stocking the DS Tool Kit

#1.9 Transition Spectrum: Intentional Planning to Engage and Open the World
of Opportunities


Bea Awoniyi, Florida State University

Lyla Crawford, University of Washington

Patricia Richter, Kutztown University

Andy Snuggs, Florida State University


Students with disabilities are more at risk of dropping out of college than
their counterparts without disabilities. Without targeted preparation and intentional
supports that are ongoing, students with disabilities will drop out or fail
out of college and/or become unsuccessful at work. The session will present
characteristics and risk factors for first time in college students (FTIC),
transferred students with disabilities; graduate students, etc.; documentation
challenges for these students; and share successful and engaging transition
programs.

Audience: Intermediate

Transition

#1.10 Serving Wounded Warriors: Current Practices

Mary Lee Vance, University of Wisconsin, Superior

Wayne Miller, University of Connecticut


The 2008 AHEAD Conference plenary session “A Call to Action: Preparing
to Serve Wounded Warriors,” underscored the need for information regarding
the role disability professionals and campuses play with wounded warrior’s
service provisions. This conference session will share the results of the national
study that explored what campus services, accommodations and other resources
are available to wounded warriors. Participants will have an increased level
of understanding regarding current post-secondary practices utilized nationally
to welcome and accommodate wounded warriors, including an understanding of
the GI Bill, the role of the Veterans Administration and VA disability documentation.

Audience: All

Wounded Warriors: Serving Those Who Served

Back to top

CONCURRENT BLOCK TWO

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22ND 2:30 PM-3:30 PM

#2.1 Affordable Reading Systems

Gaeir Dietrich, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

Jayme Johnson, HTCTU, California Community Colleges


Growing numbers of students with print disabilities are requesting e-text and
audio versions of instructional materials. While some e-text and audio format
players come with big price tags, there is software available at low cost or
even free of charge. Learn more about the features and usability of these inexpensive
products and where you can find them. Participants will have a better understanding
of how to choose reading technology to meet student needs and will be aware
of a number of inexpensive AT options.

Audience: All

AT -Lecture/Demo

#2.2 Assistive Technology: A How-to-Guide for Incorporating Assistive Technology
Campus-Wide


Amy Danzo, Northern Kentucky University

Lisa Besnoy, Northern Kentucky University


This presentation is based on a case study. The presentation will address three
AHEAD Professional Standards: 1) Direct Service; 2) Consultation/Collaboration;
and 3) Institutional Awareness. Participants will learn how to implement a
campus wide initiative to incorporate assistive technology in classrooms and
computer labs, thus increasing the opportunity for all students with disabilities
to increase autonomy through assistive technology.

Audience: Intermediate

AT -Lecture/Demo

#2.3 Classroom Observations: What Can be Learned From Being in the Classroom?

Lydia Block, Ohio Wesleyan University

Chrity Lendman, Lendman Educational Consulting


In order for a campus to become truly inclusive, the Disability Service Provider
needs to be included in conversations about what goes on in classrooms. The
DS Provider often arranges accommodations outside of the classroom, and has
very little direct contact with students while they are in classroom settings.
This session will help participants learn about the value of classroom observations,
when and how to do them, and what can be learned and shared as a result.

Audience: All

Topics in Disability Services

#2.4 MPLTL: Enhancing Access to Science/Math with Learning Technologies and
UDI


David Parker, Washington University in St. Louis

Christine Duden Street, Washington University in St. Louis


Mastery Peer Led Team Learning (MPLTL) makes chemistry and calculus courses
more accessible for students with LD/ADHD.

Midwestern university has trained peer leaders in the Principles of Universal
Design for Instruction (UDI). They then create learning tools to enhance clarity,
retention, and engagement while facilitating group learning. The project Web
site delivers “self-talk” videos to foster students’ problem-solving
skills.

Audience: All

Topics in Disability Services

#2.5 Foreign Languages and Students with Visual Impairments: How to Prepare?

Kristina Clark, University of Texas at Arlington

Demarice Dumerer, University of Texas at Arlington

In our quest for “global access” one of the largest challenges
for the DSS office is how to make foreign languages accessible to students
with visual impairments. Determining how to make the materials accessible can
be a complex issue. This session will address preparation needed and offer
some tips and tricks to aid in creating materials in an accessible format.

Audience: All

Complex Issues: Introducing the Unfamiliar to the Underprepared

#2.6 Who am I? Understanding the Self-Concept of University Students with
Disabilities


Michael Brooks, Brigham Young University

Jenny Brooks, Brigham Young University - Adjunct

Derek Griner, Brigham Young University


Self-concept plays a critical role in how students with disabilities view themselves.
However, the study of how students’ diverse backgrounds interact with
disability to form self-concept is largely unstudied. This lecture reviews
the authors’ study of this question. Contributions of demographic factors
and disability type to self-concept will be discussed, as will practical applications
of self-concept to behavior and attitudes. This will aid disability service
providers in their understanding and management of diverse student concerns.

Audience: All

Diversity and Self-Identity

#2.7 Symposium: Israel’s Unique Response to Meet the Needs of
Adults with LD/ADHD in Higher Education Part II


Susan Vogel, Northern Illinois University

Anat Ben-Simon, National Institute of Testing and Evaluation


Part II offers a presentation regarding a computer-driven diagnostic method
to diagnose LD in adults and make recommendations for appropriate accommodations.

Audience: All

International Law and Practice: Seeking Common Ground

#2.8 The Umbrella Approach to Disability Services

Elizabeth Irwin, Suffolk University

Kirsten Behling, Suffolk University


Professionals in the field of disability services wear many hats: direct service
providers, assistive technology specialists, alternate format of text consultants,
peer note taking and exam accommodations coordinators, faculty and staff informants,
teaching disability awareness education initiatives, universal design specialists,
and the list goes on... This is the umbrella approach to disability services.
This interactive presentation will showcase an urban private university that
within one year has grown from a one person office to utilizing this umbrella
approach successfully. The session will offer tools on how to embrace a university
community in providing effective universally designed disability services to
campuses nationwide.

Audience: All

Professional Competence: Stocking the DS Tool Kit

#2.9 Using Electronic Mentoring Programs to Improve Transition to College
Outcomes


Margo Vreeburg Izzo, The Ohio State University

Bianca McArrell, The Ohio State University

Jennifer Earley, The Ohio State University Nisonger Center


Mentoring is an evidence-based practice that can be used to prepare high school
students for college. This session will briefly describe evidence-based research
of both electronic and face-to-face mentoring. Presenters will describe models
to implement mentoring programs to better prepare high school students for
their transition to college. Participants will discuss how to adapt mentoring
programs to their local communities.

Audience: All

Transition

#2.10 Veterans as Students: An Honorable Task

Anna Escamilla, St. Edward’s University

Needs of students with disabilities take new perspectives when considering
military veterans. These students rarely identify with disabilities, but may
become the focus of concern in the classroom, offices, and general interaction.
Sensitivity and support is possible through campus-wide efforts including the
training of faculty, staff, and students who learn respect for global awareness
these students bring to a campus. Participants will learn one method for developing
a campus-wide task force for dealing with issues related to returning Combat
Veterans and learn the successes and pitfalls related to the development, impact,
and on-going involvement of a Combat Veterans task force

Audience: All

Wounded Warriors: Serving Those Who Served

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CONCURRENT BLOCK THREE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 22ND 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

#3.1 Creating Accessible PDFs with Adobe Acrobat Pro

Jayme Johnson, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

This presentation will provide an overview of the process for creating accessible
PDF documents with Adobe Acrobat Pro. Participants will be get hands-on experience
with creating accessible PDF documents. Common design elements will be explained
as well as their significance to accessibility. Best practices for workflow
and information management will be learned as well.

Audience: Intermediate

AT -Computer Lab

#3.2 Assistive Technology Showcase: University of Wisconsin-Madison Center
for Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology


Jay K. Martin, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Student Representatives


This program will demonstrate and discuss the Assistive Technology that has
been developed by Capstone Design Students and Faculty at the University of
Wisconsin-Madison. Designs to be shown and discussed include the advanced powered
wheelchair and numerous projects to assist with post-secondary access for students
with disabilities.

Audience: All

AT - Lecture/Demo

#3.3 The Long Road to Social Justice: The Intersection of Perception, Disability
Policy and the Service Professional


Gladys Loewen, Project PACE, University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Bill Pollard, University of Massachusetts, Boston


Programs and policies at all levels (national, state/province, local and institutional)
have both a direct and indirect influence on society due to the attitude and
thinking about disability by the policy makers. Some policies and programs
are based on social welfare ideology which typically use eligibility criteria
as a screening measure; others are based on discrimination or social justice
ideology that require a systemic change to promote effective solutions that
advance inclusive and effective participation. This session will take a historical
look at the development, implementation and impact of social policy on the
present day lives of disabled people. Through the exploration of current thinking
of disability, the attendee will be provided with the opportunity to consider
current campus policies, their effect on service delivery, and the role of
the service professional.

Audience: Novice

New DS Professionals

#3.4 A Universal Approach Toward Academically Advising Students with Disabilities

LaDonna Bridges, Springfield College

Mary Lee Vance, University of Wisconsin, Superior


What are best practices for a universal academic advisement program for disabled
students? The presenters, co-editors of the 2009 NACADA monograph Advising
Students with Disabilities, 2nd edition, will share their findings and provide
time for participants to engage in discussions related to the roles advisors,
faculty and disability professionals (who sometimes may be one and the same)
play with advisement.

Audience: All

Topics in Disability Services

#3.5 Five Institutional Approaches to Supporting College Students Who Need
Personal Assistance Services


Brad Hedrick, University of Illinois

Jean Denny, Wright State University

Robert McConnell, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

Connie Wiersma, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater


This presentation will describe the operational and fiscal elements, and graduation
and employment outcomes of students with disabilities who have been served
through the institutionally sponsored personal assistance services (PAS) programs
at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, the University of California-Berkeley,
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater,
and Wright State University. Implications for replication will be discussed.

Audience: All

Complex Issues: Introducing the Unfamiliar to the Underprepared

#3.6 LD Identity Development: Best Practices for Supporting a Positive Academic
Self-Concept


Lorri LaMagdelaine, Landmark College

Peter Falion, Landmark College


This interactive workshop will provide participants with an opportunity to
explore the difficulties students encounter developing a LD identity. Through
case study scenarios participants will identity which potential stage of social
identity development a student is in and practice how to provide support in
specific areas that contribute to developing a positive academic self-concept.

Audience: Intermediate

Diversity and Self-Identity

#3.7 Symposium: Israel’s Unique Response to Meet the Needs of
Adults with LD/ADHD in Higher Education Part III


Susan Vogel, Northern Illinois University

Yael Meltzer, Tel Hai Academic College


Part III of this symposium will describe the Tel Hai Academic College intensive
summer program and support center that have become a model in Israel.

Audience: All

International Law and Practice: Seeking Common Ground

#3.8 Building Your Program: Data Management and Budget-Resource Development
in DSS


Tom Thompson, Wm. R. Harper College

Learn how to use data tracking and reporting to your best advantage: as a way
to make your case for resources! An experienced provider in DSS has overseen
growth of a program serving 100 students in 1980 to serving 1,100 students
in 2008. Funding for expansion has come from institutional funds, grants, corporate
support and private donations. Participants will gain an understanding of the
principles, practices and methods of resource development and be able to devise
one or two strategies to develop and employ on their campuses.

Audience: Intermediate

Professional Competence: Stocking the DS Tool Kit

#3.9 Transition Planning in Light of IDEA and in the Shadow of the ADAAA

Manjushri Banerjee, University of Connecticut

Loring Brinckerhoff, Educational Testing Service


Given the latest reauthorization of IDEA and evolving views of disability definition
and documentation under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 2008 (ADAA)
it is time to rethink conventional wisdom that has guided disability documentation
policies for testing agencies and service providers. This presentation discusses
the implications of these latest statutes for students transitioning from high
school to college.

Audience: Advanced

Transition

#3.10 Cultural Differences: Potential Conflicts Between Military and Civilian
Beliefs


Sven Jones, George Mason University

Christopher Moy, George Mason University


This workshop is intended to reduce potential conflict between both military
and non-military minded representatives within the higher education community.
Our premise considers that alienation issues often accompanying veterans with
disabilities can be aggravated by those who profoundly misunderstand them.
Likewise, our veterans may hold unreasonable expectations about the civilian
world. We offer an alternative context to frame both perspectives through an
application of Universal Design for Learning principles to assist with veterans
returning to college/university.

Audience: All

Wounded Warriors: Serving Those Who Served

Back to top

CONCURRENT BLOCK FOUR

THURSDAY, JULY 23RD 11:00 AM-12:30 PM

#4.1 Creating Effective and Accessible Educational Podcasts

Beth Case, Texas Tech University

Roseanna Davidson, Texas Tech University

Everyone is jumping on the podcast bandwagon! And with good reason - podcasts
can be a valuable educational tool. But are your college’s podcasts effective?
Are they accessible? Learn what works, what doesn’t, how to make them
- hands on - and how to make sure students with disabilities benefit from this
exciting resource. Both audio and video podcasts will be covered. Attendees
will learn how to make podcasts more effective and accessible teaching tools.

Audience: All

AT -Lecture/Demo

#4.2 One University’s Response to E-Text Legislation Arrives
at Open-Source Solution for All!


Ian Campbell, Central Washington University

Ed Gellenbeck, Central Washington University

Justyn Bell, Central Washington University


Central Washington University’s journey for compliance with Washington
State e-text legislation facilitated development of a free open-source e-text
reader available to the public. Come learn about this journey and how it’s
contributing not only to other Washington State institutions but also to the
global cause of print accessibility. Participants of this session will learn
about the inner workings of alternative format production at CWU, how one institution
has responded to state e-text legislation, and how CWU’s efforts could
contribute directly to students success at other institutions

Audience: Intermediate

AT - Lecture/Demo

#4.3 Documentation: What do we Really Need to Know?

L. Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

AHEAD’s Best Practices in Documentation was designed to emphasize the
need for case-by-case analysis, professional judgment, and institutional fit
in documentation standards. This session, created for new professionals and
those re-considering their documentation guidelines in light of the Amendments
Act, returning veterans and the realities of documentation coming from the
public school system, provides guidance in creating a comprehensive and consistent
approach to documentation that is responsive to both legal expectations and
a move toward a social model of disability. This approach seeks to move from
a procedural review of documents to a collaborative process focused on the
substance of disability, access and accommodation.

Audience: Novice

New DS Professionals

#4.4 Think College: Postsecondary Education for Individuals with Developmental
Disabilities


Cate Weir, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Debra Hart, University of Massachusetts, Boston


The Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston
has received federal funding to conduct research, disseminate information and
provide training and technical assistance on promising practices that support
individuals with developmental/intellectual disabilities to access inclusive
postsecondary education. This session will provide an overview of the two federal
grants that have been received, present early results of the research into
current practices, and outline training and technical assistance opportunities.

Audience: All

Topics in Disability Services

#4.5 Collaborations that Support Social Language Development of Students with
Autism Spectrum Disorder.


Michaelene Cronin, Landmark College

Andrew Donahue, Landmark College


Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) face unique social challenges
on campuses. Many of these students experienced social skills groups throughout
their k-12 careers and balk at having to face more of the same. Using campus
collaborations outside of the disability services office, colleges can create
a student-driven social language curriculum with socialization opportunities
that support participation in campus life. Through an interactive format, participants
will 1) Review various formats for social language groups 2) Reflect on the
resources available on their own campus to support social language groups 3)
Review existing literature on social language groups on campuses.

Audience: Intermediate

Complex Issues: Introducing the Unfamiliar to the Underprepared

#4.6 Breaking through the Silence of Disability and Multiple Identities

Linda Wolford, University of Minnesota

Dann Trainer, University of Minnesota

Betty Benson, University of Minnesota


As individuals with disabilities, family members with disabilities, or disability
professionals, we all can relate to the silence that follows when the topic
of disability arises . “Disability” often evokes responses of sympathy,
pity or discomfort. This session will focus on breaking through this silence
by moving beyond looking at disability as something to be “accommodated” and
exploring it as an aspect of identity. The goal is to provide campuses with
a forum to create campus dialogues around disability and other diversity initiatives.

Audience: All

Diversity and Self-Identity

#4.7 Attitudinal And Physical Access To Tertiary Education In Hong Kong

Christie Gilson, Moravian College

Western perspectives of disability are no longer seen as the gold standard
by which higher education institutions measure their disability services. This
presentation will share the results of a qualitative study of students with
disabilities, service providers, and instructors at a university in Hong Kong
in order to help participants redesign their disability services in a more
inclusive manner.

Audience: All

International Law and Practice: Seeking Common Ground

#4.8 Symposium: Section 508 in California Colleges: Lessons for All

The Impact of 508 in the College Setting

Gaeir Dietrich, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act pertains to electronic and information
technology (E&IT) on college campuses throughout California. Does it apply
to your state and college, too? Come find out how the Section 508 standards
affect you and your college. Participants will understand what the Section
508 standards are and how conforming to the standards affects the purchase
of E&IT on campuses.

Building Communities of Practice -- Implementation of a Web-Based 508 Documentation
Repository


Sam Ogami, California State University

Learn how the California State University system developed and implemented
a web-based repository for storing and sharing accessibility information, product
evaluations, and other resources regarding the accessibility features of electronic
and information technology (E&IT) products. Learn how you can participate
in this undertaking and become a member of a community of practice around the
sharing of knowledge and best practices.

Audience: All

Professional Competence: Stocking the DS Tool Kit

#4.9 Bachelor Level College Graduates with Disabilities in the American Labor
Market


Oce Harrison, New England ADA Center, A Project of the Institute for Human
Centered Design

Veronica Porter, Northeastern University


There is a high correlation between educational attainment and employability
of individuals with disabilities. However, since the passage of the Americans
with Disabilities Act, the employment rate of the disabled has declined. How
can colleges prepare disabled students to gain access to the labor market?
This presentation focuses on labor market research and strategies for transitioning
from college to work. Presenters will identify innovative approaches and tested
solutions that improve education and increase employment outcomes for students
with disabilities

Audience: All

Transition

#4.10 Presidential “Suspire”

Mike Shuttic, AHEAD President

Come take a “long deep breath” AKA “suspire” in this
facilitated discussion with seasoned, knowledgeable DS providers on the more
complex issues impacting the field. Focus on ideological perspectives, impacting
variables, priorities, and feasibility. The intent is on strategizing and identifying
appropriate means of addressing needs and concerns within and without the DS
field that have significant impact on persons with disabilities.

Audience: Intermediate to Advanced

Topics in Disability Services

Back to top

CONCURRENT BLOCK FIVE

THURSDAY, JULY 23RD 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

#5.1 Creating and Using Accessible Mathematical Content

Steve Noble, University of Louisville

In the last few years, math accessibility has moved from the research lab into
the real world. This presentation will demonstrate how to use available technologies
to create accessible math materials for your students, and how students with
various disabilities can write complex math equations independently.

Audience: Intermediate

AT -Lecture/Demo

#5.2 Accessible On-Line Learning

Beth Case, Texas Tech University

Roseanna Davidson, Texas Tech University


The proliferation of on-line learning greatly benefits some students with disabilities,
but creates a barrier to others. This presentation provides you with knowledge
and simple tools to proactively make on-line information accessible, avoiding
the last minute scramble to provide access after registration. No prior technical
knowledge is required! Participants will learn how to proactively make on-line
content accessible, including identifying problem areas and how to correct
the most common problems.

Audience: All

AT-Lecture/Demo

#5.3 Management of Psychiatric Emergencies: Challenges for Disability Services
Coordinators


Carol Barnett, Berea College

Conflicting demands to the skills of the disability services coordinators in
managing students with psychiatric emergencies will be discussed. The magnitude
of students at risk of violence to self and others will be documented with
factual data. The competing demands of ADA compliance will be juxtaposed with
protection of privacy, and the obligation to ensure safety on our college campuses.

Audience: Intermediate

Topics in Disability Services

#5.4 Outreach: A Crucial Component of DS Work

Katheryne Staeger-Wilson, Missouri State University

An important part of creating an accessible academic experience for students
is the work we do with our campus colleagues. Consultation, collaboration,
and taking an active leadership role as the institution moves in more inclusive
directions is an essential part of a disability professional’s role,
yet it is often sidelined because of the demands of daily work on individual
issues. This presentation, by a service provider from a single-staff office,
provides strategies for affecting campus culture and making system change even
in a busy service office.

Audience: Novice

New DS Professionals

#5.5 Mentoring Partnerships: Overcoming Ability Barriers for Students with
Intellectual Differences on Campus


Melissa Jones, Northern Kentucky University

College students with intellectual differences are confronted with a variety
of barriers ranging from inaccessible teaching formats to campus events that
require social and problem solving skills to negotiate independently. One strategy
for overcoming these barriers is through the development of mentoring partnerships.
Using an interactive format, professors and mentoring partners will share their
stories, strategies, and lessons learned. Participants will be able to define
a mentoring partnership, and identify at lest three key components for designing
and implementing mentoring partnerships on college campuses.

Audience: All

Complex Issues: Introducing the Unfamiliar to the Underprepared

#5.6 Am I Invisible: Exploring Diversity and Disability Through the Lens of
Powerlessness


Lusharon Wiley, University of West Florida

Disability service providers act as allies for their students in their struggle
for inclusion. While experiences vary among persons with disabilities, what
most persons with disabilities share is a common history of marginalization
and stigmatization. This interactive workshop explores the concepts of domination,
powerlessness, and the social construction of identity as barriers to universal
inclusion and acceptance. Participants will gain exposure to the concepts of
marginalization, double-consciousness, and domination by participating group
discussion facilitated by the presenter.

Audience: All

Diversity and Self-Identity

#5.7 Getting AHEAD in South Africa

Nita Lawson-Misra, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

This paper will address the concept and understanding of how equal access is
spread or not spread throughout society. Although higher education institutions
have begun implementing organizational and legislative changes to improve access
and ensure equitable participation for students with disabilities in education,
South African society needs to address disability equity more holistically.
The conscience of a nascent democracy demands that all past injustices be addressed
instantly. However, it is a well established fact that genuine redress occurs
in stages. In South Africa, while huge strides have been taken to create opportunities
for equality in race and gender issues, access for disabled people continues
to remain a challenge. Although the moral obligation to redress this past inequity
is fairly widely acknowledged and accepted, lack of sweeping attitudinal change,
inadequate financial resources and inaccessible infrastructure continue to
stymie progress. While legislative changes have been in place for 10-15 years,
these questions remain: have the necessary cultural changes and improvements
in service delivery taken place to reflect the intent of the legislation? How
has this impacted on the learning experiences of students with disabilities
in higher education today? What else is required to allow for a seamless transition
into an inclusive society? These and other such pertinent questions and possible
solutions will form the fulcrum of my discussion.

Audience: All

International Law and Practice: Seeking Common Ground

#5.8 DS Office Management: A Hands-On Demonstration of the Student Accommodations
Manager (SAM)


Joe Tedesco, AMAC/University of Georgia

Bonnie Martin, Georgia Perimeter College


The Student Accommodations Manager (SAM), an internet-based disability services
database system will be demonstrated and participants given the opportunity
to develop a plan for implementing a system on their campuses. Presenters will
review accountability for disability service offices, discuss and demonstrate
SAM and provide tools to conduct a needs assessment and strategic plans to
implement an electronic database system.

Audience: All

Professional Competence: Stocking the DS Tool Kit

#5.9 A Webcast Series to Prepare Secondary School Students with Disabilities
for STEM College and Careers


Clark Shingledecker, Wright State University

Jeffrey Vernooy, WrightState University


Innovative approaches are needed to increase the representation of students
with disabilities in postsecondary science, technology, engineering, mathematics
(STEM) education. This presentation will describe a university-based series
of interactive web broadcasts for 11 - 15 year old students and their parents
designed to raise interest in STEM fields and to promote early college planning,
academic preparation and personal skill development. Lecture material and demonstrations
will provide participants with knowledge of the barriers that limit postsecondary
educational success for students with disabilities and demonstrate web cast
content and presentation formats that can help reduce these self-imposed and
external impediments.

Audience: All

Transition

#5.10 Welcome Home: Understanding the Unique Needs of our Disabled Student
Patriots


Kathy Loder-Murphy, Rutgers University

The disabled student veterans are returning home to our universities. Their
combat experiences have provided them with leadership skills and abilities
quite different than the typical college student. Unfortunately, their experiences
have also had lasting psychological, emotional and cognitive consequences.
Through case studies and video interviews, the participant will gain an understanding
of the needs of the disabled student veteran and will learn the language of
PTSD and TBI. A Model Program for welcoming the disabled student veteran to
the college environment will be outlined.

Audience: All

Wounded Warriors: Serving Those Who Served

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CONCURRENT BLOCK SIX

THURSDAY, JULY 23RD 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

#6.1 Microsoft Word + MathType + DBT = Math Braille (Nemeth)

Susan Christensen, Braille Production & Software Specialist

Using Microsoft Word and MathType is an effective method for preparing files
for Nemeth braille. Become familiar with the MathType symbol and template palettes
and as well as creating custom tabs. Learn how MathType interfaces with Microsoft
Word and DBT to provide Nemeth braille. The techniques learned during this
session are also useful for preparing math for other alternate media.

Audience: All

AT-Computer Lab

#6.2 UD Evolution: Reading Technology Transitions from AT Lab to Entire College
Community


Jill Triana, Meredith College

Cheryl Todd, Meredith College

Crystal Burwell, Meredith Collge


Since each generation of college students is becoming increasingly adept and
dependent on technology, DS providers must form crucial partnerships to meet
student need. This presentation will provide behind-the-scenes knowledge of
how to use Reading Technology to implement Universal Design principles. Presenters
will share their experiences with bringing Reading Technology out of the AT
lab to the entire campus community.

Audience: All

AT - Lecture/Demo

#6.3 Strategic Planning: A Vital Process for a Vital Disability Services Office

Melaine Thornton, University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Often new professionals are hired into an office that has been functioning
on a predecessor’s vision or ‘the way it’s always been done’.
As new program directors and coordinators develop and refine the tools of the
profession (documentation review, accommodation determination, outreach, etc.),
it’s equally important that to consider the values that drive office
policies and procedures and the goals that guide program evolution. Join us
as we explore the strategic planning process, from the messages that our office
identity conveys to the framework under which we engage with students and faculty
to the long-term goals that will direct our growth. Facilitators will present
the strategic planning process as a tool for advancing our profession toward
the vision of full participation of people with disabilities and the creation
of usable, sustainable and inclusive learning environments.

Audience: Novice

New DS Professionals

#6.4 Accommodating Mental Health Disabilities: Case Studies Highlighting Campus
Collaboration Across the University


Neal Lipsitz, College of the Holy Cross

Eileen Connell Berger, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Suzy Conway, Boston College


Three case studies presented by disability service administrators from three
different colleges, will examine the extensive campus collaboration necessary
to affect positive outcomes for students with mental health disabilities. Participants
will better understand the need for campus-wide collaboration, how to achieve
it, and the academic, clinical, ethical, and legal issues that emerge when
providing accommodations to these students.

Audience: All

Topics in Disability Services

#6.5 Collaborative Effort: Developing a Model for Access to Higher Education
for Student Veterans with Disabilities


Jorja Waybrant, Dickinson College

Lawrence Doperak, Community College of Allegheny County

Vanessa Johnson, Duquesne University

Diane Wieland, LaSalle University

Mary Jane Snyder, Duquesne University


Networking on campus is necessary to promote access to programs and services
for student veterans with disabilities. Networking with outside agencies is
vital to ensure knowledge of access. Learn why a collaborative effort to provide
information on and off-campus about available services is critical to students
with new disabilities - especially student veterans who may have no prior history,
use, or knowledge of accessing disability services.

Audience: All

Wounded Warriors: Serving Those Who Served

#6.6 Standing Up for Diversity: Current Status and Future Plans - An Open
Forum


Ruth Warick, University of British Columbia

Bea Awoniyi, Florida State University

Mattie E. Grace, University of Southern California

Kelly Leonard, Purdue University

Roxana Stupp, University of Illinois at Chicago


AHEAD’s Diversity Initiative project addresses diversity within the Association,
our profession and our institutions. This session reports back on the Diversity
Strategic Plan developed as a follow-up to focus group sessions held at the
2008 AHEAD conference, along with input from the AHEAD board of directors.
Future directions will also be identified through this workshop.

Audience: All

Diversity and Self-Identity

#6.7 Global Access for Students with Mobility Disabilities

Troy Brenner, Central Washington University

Due to the Americans with Disabilities Act, what students take for granted
in physical accessibility in the United States is not what they can expect
while traveling and studying abroad. In this session, a former student and
current disability service provider shares his travel experiences as a student
wheelchair user in Austria, Germany, the Czech Republic and Ireland. Participants
will learn about barriers to international travel for individuals with mobility
and physical disabilities and how those barriers limit study abroad opportunities.

Audience: All

International Law and Practice: Seeking Common Ground

#6.8 Student Mental Health: A Campus-wide Public Health Approach

Betty Benson, University of Minnesota

Barbara Blacklock, University of Minnesota


This session will provide an overview of the public health approach to student
mental health and will demonstrate how this approach reflects a Universal Design
perspective. The presenters will provide practical information participants
can use in duplicating and sustaining a low-cost, collaborative model on their
own campuses. Participants will leave this session with an understanding of
the role of Disability Services offices in promoting student mental health.
Participants will leave the session with low-cost, practical strategies for
developing and sustaining a campus-wide mental health initiative.

Audience: All

Professional Competence: Stocking the DS Tool Kit

#6.9 The Autism College Transition (ACT) Program: A Replicable Model of Collaboration

Melinda Reames, Educational Service Center of Central Ohio

Wayne Cocchi, Columbus State Community College


This presentation for Disability Service Coordinators will describe the ACT
program: a partnership between Ohio K-12 school districts and Columbus State
Community College. Participants will learn about services students receive
through ACT and the strategies ACT uses to create a community of interest among
the faculty. Participants will evaluate the possibility of replicating the
ACT program in their own context. Participants to receive tools, strategies
and a road map to replicate the transition to college program for students
on the Autism Spectrum in their own setting.

Audience: All

Transition

#6.10 Keeping It Legal: Learning from Others’ Mistakes, Avoiding
Accessibility Complaints and Litigation


Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

The University of Michigan, McNeese State University, several California campuses,
the University of Chicago, and others have been recent subjects of complaints,
OCR or DOJ reviews, or litigation about physical access. Some agreements impose
sweeping requirements, close monitoring, and heavy attorneys’ fees. Learn
from a former DOJ attorney about what can go wrong and how you can help your
institution avoid these consequences through planning for compliance and responding
appropriately to developing problems.

Audience: All

Topics in Disability Services

Back to top

CONCURRENT BLOCK SEVEN

FRIDAY, JULY 24TH 8:30 AM-10:30 AM

#7.1 Using the ‘Save as DAISY’ plug-in to create Accessible
Content


Sam Ogami, California State University

Jayme Johnson, HTCTU, California Community Colleges


DAISY is the most accessible document format used throughout the world today.
Come learn about the ‘Save as DAISY’ XML plugin, a tool which will
enable you -- and even your faculty and staff -- to easily create accessible
documents straight from Microsoft Word. Participants will gain an understanding
of the DAISY file format and how it provides access for students with different
disabilities. Participants will learn about a variety of media authoring tools
that support the DAISY format, as well as the many options for playing DAISY
files.

Audience: All

AT- Computer Lab

#7.2 Creating a Summer Transition Program or College Camp from Concept to Reality

Kathy Hoffman, Erie Community College

Marianne Savino, Buffalo State College

Heather Martin, Erie Community College

Jennifer Herrmann, Canisius College


Conference participants will learn how to plan and implement a transition camp
for students focusing on students needs for self-advocacy, self- esteem, strategies
for studying and time management. A major focus will be on how to present the
college experience in terms that allow the student to make informed choices.
Hands-on materials are included.

Audience: All

Transition

#7.3 WE are The Underprepared! Getting Ready for the Coming of Online Learning

Jane Jarrow, Disability Compliance in Career and Online Learning

Julie Scaff, University of Phoenix - Onine Campus

Shannon Wilke, University of Phoenix - Online

Robert Becker, University of Phoenix - Online

Kelly Hermann, Empire State College


The virtual world of online education creates a kind of “alternate universe” for
DSS providers. The limitations imposed by disability are familiar, but the
way they impact on the new learning environment demands unfamiliar responses.
Explore what we know - and what we must learn - to provide comparable support
to the growing legion of online learners with disabilities. Participants in
this session will learn to identify significant differences between service
delivery systems online and on-campus; participants will leave the session
with a number of action steps to be followed on return to their home campuses
in seeking to bring the quality and scope of support services for online learners
in line with that available in traditional settings

Audience: All

Topics in Disability Services

#7.4 Pioneers in Using ACCESS (Assessment of Campus Climate): What Have We
Learned Thus Far?


Susan Vogel, Northern Illinois University

Joan Green, University of New Mexico

Susan Mann-Dolce, SUNY Buffalo

Susan Parsons, Slippery Rock University

Gregory Moorehead, Rutgers University

Jamin Totino, Skidmore College

Steven R. Sligar, East Carolina University

Dymaneke Mitchell, National-Luis University


A panel composed of those who used the four ACCESS questionnaires on their
campus will describe some of the following: their motivation for disseminating
the questionnaires, funding source, support team, strategies to enhance response
rate, challenges encountered, findings, and the anticipated impact of this
initiative. Each will describe the major findings and how they utilized them
to enhance campus climate thus far. The moderator will summarize the highlights
and facilitate the opportunity for interaction among the panelists and audience.

Audience: All

Topics in Disability Services

#7.5 Symposium: Applying a Global Perspective to Faculty Training

Integration of Global Accessibility into the Conception, Design, and Presentation
of Educator Course Content.

Tracy Donald, Auburn University

Clay Yarbrough, Auburn University

Tina Gilbert, Auburn University

Paul Cole, Auburn University


Disability awareness has advanced to the point where educators should be creating
teaching materials with global access in mind. This presentation group consisting
of assistive and instructional technology specialists will provide proven methods
needed to teach educators the importance of incorporating universal design
into their courses. They will discuss the implementation of accessible design
in distance learning and online courses. Participants should gain the ability
to practically apply learned techniques to teach on-site educators the methods
of incorporating global accessibility into new or existing courses.

Expanding the World of Instruction: Faculty Taking On Universal Design for
Learning


Mari Guillermo, San Diego State University

Bobbie Atkins, San Diego State University

Nan Zhang Hampton, San Diego State University


This presentation will: (a) provide innovative examples of Universal Design
for Learning being implemented in 2-year and 4-year institutions; (b) share
how learning communities are being created to foster collaboration, mentorship,
and transfer of knowledge within the higher education community; and (c) examine
the development of an evaluation model to inform a program focused on faculty/administrator/staff
development.

Audience: All

Complex Issues: Introducing the Unfamiliar to the Underprepared

#7.6 Disability Reconsidered: Using Film to Continue the Dialogue on Disability
and Life


Karen Pettus, University of South Carolina

Movies are considered a reflection of the views and beliefs of our society
as a whole. Hollywood seldom portrays individuals with disabilities in a realistic
or illuminating manner. Participants will view a movie depicting social issues
faced by members of the disabled community and afterwards discuss the movie,
the characters, and the current social issues addressed in the film.

Audience: All

Diversity and Self-Identity

#7.7 The US Legal Year in Review

Jo Anne Simon, Attorney at Law

Paul Grossman, Hastings College of Law


(Throughout this conference, Mr. Grossman is participating in his private capacity.
The views expressed in his presentations will be the result of his independent
research and do not necessarily represent the views of the US Department of
Education or government.)

This year has been an exciting one all around! To date, ADAA and ADAAG regulations
have yet to be published, pending review, but these, FERPA changes, and other
developments have possible implications for people with disabilities in higher
education. Come explore the legal landscape, get up to speed and see what may
be on the horizon.

Audience: All

#7.8 Blindness 101

Gaeir Dietrich, De Anza College

Jim Marks, University of Montana

Annemarie Cooke, De Witt and Associates


Is there panic on your campus when a blind or visually impaired (B/VI) student
shows up? The presenters will provide a crash course in what it means to provide
services to a B/VI student. They will offer perspectives, advice, and practical
suggestions on what you need to know and what the student needs to know to
succeed in college today. Participants will learn the elements of coordinating
access for B/VI students, including documentation, alternate media, orientation
and mobility, curricular access, and coordination with other agencies.

Audience: All

Professional Competence: Stocking the DS Tool Kit

#7.9 Symposium: Successful Career Paths that Span the Globe

Paving the Career Employment Transition Path: Making the Commitment to Maximize
Success

Alan Muir, Career Opps for Students w/ Disabilities

Sarah Helm, The University of Tennessee


College graduates with disabilities experience an unemployment rate of 33%-45%.
Employers are seeking qualified applicants while many students with disabilities
are not competitive with others for careers. Disability Services plays an integral
role in preparing students to be competitive. This session will highlight practical
tips and tools to effectively prepare students through collaboration and resources.
Lecture and interactive discussion.

Preparing Students With Disabilities For Careers In A Globalized World

Avraham Rabby, Consultant on employment of pwd’s

In the era of globalization, international experience through study abroad
or temporary work overseas is a prized asset enhancing job search and career
prospects. Students with disabilities, previously limited in their ambitions
by overprotective parents and by rehabilitation counselors wary of exploring
uncharted waters, have to tended to stay close to home. But change is coming,
and abundant strategies and resources are available to disabled student service
professionals for advising their clients how to broaden their horizons and “go
international”.

Strategies and Resources to Support Students with Career Goals in Global Corporations

Kathy McCreedy, DiverseAbility LLC

DSS and Career Services staff play important roles in helping students prepare
for transition to a career. This session will provide strategies and resources
for participants to support students in obtaining career opportunities in global
corporations. Topics include: how to identify corporations who include people
with disabilities in diversity efforts; networking; disclosure and accommodations;
and internships and service experiences.

Audience: All

Transition

#7.10 Symposium: Spotlight on Psychological Disabilities and TBI

From Combat to College: Research on the Mental Health of Returning Veterans

Nicole Lovald, Capella University

Carlie Gebauer, Capella University


As combat veterans are returning to colleges in record numbers is your institution
prepared to understand and support their mental health needs? This presentation
will cover new research on veteran needs as they reintegrate to society and
institutions. Learn more about what you can do to assist with their re-entry
and transition following a deployment to a combat environment.

Audience: All

Peace comes with a Price: Accommodating/Serving Students with Complex Disabilities/Issues

Sarah Colby Weaver, Auburn University

Steve Guice, Auburn University


Serving students with complex disabilities may be overwhelming for DS professionals;
such as, students with TBI, psychological disabilities, PTSD, etc. With service
men and women transitioning to college, these disabilities may become prevalent.
This workshop will provide practical tips on how to better accommodate these
students while maintaining the academic integrity of the college/university
by involving various departments on campus.

Audience: All

The Rippling Effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Understanding the Effects
of Trauma on Veterans in the Academic Environment


Vannee Cao-Nguyen, University of West Florida

The psychological impact of war can be devastating. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
(PTSD) is one of the many ways veterans experience post-war adjustment difficulties.
PTSD is a complex health condition that affects an individual physically, psychologically
and socially. This presentation provides an overview of PTSD, how it affects
veterans in the academic environment and effective ways to support and accommodate
them.

Audience: All

Back to top

CONCURRENT BLOCK EIGHT

FRIDAY, JULY 24TH 2:30 PM-4:00 PM

#8.1 Accessibility in Higher Education: A Technological Perspective

Jayme Johnson, HTCTU, California Community Colleges

This session will provide an overview of the common tools and resources available
to modern service providers in the field of disability services in higher education.
Utilizing the assistive technologies themselves, participants will learn about
the specialized role of assistive technology in the educational setting and
have the opportunity for hands-on learning in a lab setting. Additionally,
the topic of alternate media will be covered, including overviews of different
production tools, resources, and best practices for production and survival
in a campus environment. Related topics such as the accessibility of modern
and emerging media forms will also be discussed. A specific focus will be provided
on how these media are impacting the design and delivery of instructional materials,
both in the face-to-face classroom and the distance education arena.

Audience: Novice

New DS Professionals in AT Lab

#8.2 AT Training: Research into Contextualized Training Delivered by Academic
Strategists


Flo Brokop, NorQuest College

How do DSS coordinators provide AT training to the increasing number and variety
of learners with disabilities? At NorQuest College, AT training was delivered
by Academic Strategists who were meeting with students on a regular basis.
But is this an effective model? The primary researcher will share findings
of a qualitative applied research project examining the efficacy of this model.
Through a presentation and discussion of the research findings participants
will understand the benefits and challenges of a subject-specific contextualized
AT training model. They will also identify characteristics of successful AT
training.

Audience: All

AT -Lecture/Demo

#8.3 Collaborative Distance Education - A New Twist on Service Delivery

Heather Webb, The University of Tennessee

Michelle Swaney, The University of Tennessee

Teressa Gregory, The University of Tennessee


In today’s rapidly growing online learning environment, institutions
are creating more online programs in order to increase enrollment. Programs
that are delivered online create challenges and barriers for Deaf and Hard
of Hearing participants, the program, and the Office of Disability Services.
This presentation will demonstrate the collaborative work of several departments
within the University of Tennessee on this issue. Participants will understand
the technology used to deliver an online curriculum as well as the components
of the software utilized to identify successful components of an online distance
program for students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

Audience: Intermediate

Topics in Disability Services

#8.4 Maximize Your AHEAD Regional Affiliate: A World of Network Opportunities

Terra Beethe, Bellevue University

Stacey Reycraft, The University of Mississippi

Adam Meyer, Saint Louis University


The presenters will address universal components of the AHEAD regional affiliate
program, including affiliation benefits with National AHEAD, regional membership
structures and activities, and the benefits and challenges of regional level
membership. This interactive session will lead audience members to understand
and synthesize new ideas, and then to apply these new ideas to strengthen their
own regional affiliate organization. AHEAD members without a regional/state
affiliate organization are also encouraged attend to learn about the benefits
of regional affiliate membership.

Audience: All

AHEAD Essentials

#8.5 College Students with Asperger’s Syndrome: Challenges for Counseling & Student
Affairs


Lisa King, Higher Education and Autism Spectrum Disorders, Inc

Lorraine Wolf, Boston University


Students with Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) and other autism spectrum disorders
are entering college in unprecedented numbers. Most students with AS have trouble
in regulating their behavior and affect, and in navigating the social and interpersonal
aspects of college. This poses challenges to students in the social and co-curricular
realm of college. Thus these difficult issues and uncharted accommodations
fall to student life and counseling. This session will present a new model
of service to the AS population.

Audience: All

Complex Issues: Introducing the Unfamiliar to the Underprepared

#8.6 Beyond Borders: Identifying Your Role as a Diversity Advocate within
Disability Services


Melanie Thompson, Southeast Missouri State University

Jenny Dugger, Drexel University

Marcus Engel, Consultant/Trainer


DSS providers have a unique opportunity to advocate for the disability-diversity
connection in varied roles. A panel consisting of a Director, a practitioner,
and a professional disability awareness speaker will present perspectives of
their personal and professional roles addressing disability within diversity,
facilitate audience discussion about other perspectives that exist, and brainstorm
where participants can take the conversation next.

Audience: Intermediate

Diversity and Self-Identity

#8.7 Working Able Mentoring: Working with Leading Employers in Ireland to
place Graduates with Disabilities in Work Internships


Ann Heelan, AHEAD in Ireland

The National Disability Authority in Ireland has asserted that “People
with disabilities are two and a half times less likely to have a job than non-disabled
people” (NDS 2005:3). Meanwhile, there are over 3,680 students with disabilities
in Irish higher education and the trend is toward steady increase. WAM, pioneered
by the Association of Higher Education Access and Disability (A.H.E.A.D. in
Ireland) creates paid internships for graduates with disabilities by working
with employers to change mindsets, perceptions and cultures. WAM has so far
facilitated 60 mentored work internships in major Irish companies and over
50% of the graduates have achieved employment at graduate level. Learn about
this successful program and ideas and applications to your own work in career
transition.

Audience: All

International Law and Practice: Seeking Common Ground

#8.8 Train Go Sorry: An introduction to working with deaf and hard-of-hearing
students


Ruth Loew, Educational Testing Service

John Hosterman, Association of American Medical Colleges

Dann Trainer, University of Minnesota

Eric Littles, Private Consulting


This session will present an overview of three topics: variation within the
deaf and hard of hearing (D/HOH) population, Deaf culture, and challenges facing
D/HOH college students. The session is primarily designed for disability-service
providers who may be unfamiliar, or feel underprepared to work, with this population.
The format will be a panel presentation followed by an interactive roundtable
discussion. Through direct interaction and discussion with the panelists, participants
will: - Increase their knowledge of the variables affecting learning and socialization
in D/HOH individuals; - Develop an increased appreciation for Deaf culture;
and - Increase their understanding of the challenges typically facing D/HOH
college students

Audience: Novice

Complex Issues: Introducing the Unfamiliar to the Underprepared

#8.9 A Regional Approach to College Access for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

Melissa Jones, Northern Kentucky University

Janet Gora, Down Syndrome Association of Greater Cincinnati

Jennifer Radt, Clermont College – University of Cincinnati

Steve Sunderland, University of Cincinnati


Transition for individuals with intellectual disabilities often does not include
experiences on a college campus. Yet, campus communities are the perfect venue
for taking risks and learning skills necessary for success as adults. To address
this incongruence, panel participants of a regional collaborative will share
experiences and insights for creating inclusive campus communities through
a continuum of programs and services. Participants will synthesize information
to use when designing programs or initiatives for improving campus access for
students with intellectual disabilities.

Audience: All

Transition

#8.10 Boot Camp for Planners: Building a Powerful Support Network for Student
Veterans


Robert Harden, Central Washington University

Veterans are a growing population within higher education. After serving across
the globe, Chapter 31 veterans are non-traditional students who find college
campuses foreign territory. Central Washington University involved veterans
in the development of a network that veterans truly wanted and would use. This
interactive presentation will help you develop ideas on inter-departmental
collaboration, grass-roots involvement and vet involvement.

Audience: All

Wounded Warriors: Serving Those Who Served

Back to top

CONCURRENT BLOCK NINE

SATURDAY, JULY 25TH 9:00 AM-10:00 AM

#9.1 The Complete DAISY Production & Playback Solution

Archana Bharathan, Dolphin Computer Access

The DAISY standard is officially the ANSI/NISO Z39.86 Specifications for accessible
digital audio books that are created to play on DAISY players. The Dolphin
DAISY solution is designed to address the challenging issues of intuitive DAISY
creation, file conversion and choice of access. The session is designed to
showcase the only complete DAISY solution “from production to playback” that
alternative format providers & specialists may like to add to their toolkit.

Audience: All

AT – Computer Lab

#9.2 Technology to Help Struggling Students Transition into the College Setting

Jennifer Ray, Texthelp Systems, Inc.

How do we ensure success for all students entering into post-secondary education?
Having access to the right technology can help to bridge that transition. Universally
Designed support tools, such as Read&Write GOLD, can help struggling students
by giving them an edge in learning and studying as it helps build reading and
writing skills. Participants will: - Explore the difficulties that students
face transitioning into higher education - Examine various levels of program
support features and their implications for assisting different types of students.
- Identify strategies for using technology to address UDL initiatives.

Audience: All

AT -Lecture/Demo

#9.3 Creating and Using Teams/Committees for Decision Making

Jim Kessler, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Theresa Maitland, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill


A team approach in the development of policies, guidelines and procedures as
well as review of documentation provides objectivity, discussion and increases
the institutional perspective and commitment. We will discuss the development
of the team(s), purpose and goals, who is to be included, and why they are
critical. It is a model that can be replicated regardless of the size of the
office.

Audience: All

Topics in Disability Services

#9.4 Implementing AHEAD’s Program Standards: Different Approaches
Different Outcomes


Alberto Guzman, University of Illinois at Chicago

This study used a mixed methods design to explored the prevalence of three
ideological approaches: individual, social and universal, during the implementation
of the AHEAD’s program standards. This presentation highlights the findings,
including plausible explanations offered by AHEAD members in regard to their
meaning. The conclusion will illustrate the implications of the findings on
the provision of state-of-art services for students with disabilities in postsecondary
education.

Audience: All

AHEAD Essentials

#9.5 Education Without Borders: Why You Should Care About Study Abroad

Cheryl Ashcroft, Lehigh University

Marta Lukjan Weber, alum Princeton University

Lynnett Van Slyke1, University of Pittsburgh

Lindsey Newland, University of Kentucky


The number of students studying abroad has increased 150% in the past decade,
and students with disabilities are equally interested. Learn the impact study
abroad experiences had on the lives and careers of two students with disabilities
and how they managed overseas. Also, hear from two experienced disability service
providers on strategies to address with students before they travel. Attendees
will identify, from a student perspective, ways in which study abroad is important
to a student’s education and what planning strategies work best to access
accommodations once abroad; learn specific steps to take in collaborating with
the study abroad office and/or other university departments when a student
is planning to go abroad; and develop strategies to problem-solve access barriers
or anticipate supports needed as students transition to the host country

Audience: All

Transition

#9.6 Balancing Multiple Identities

Mary Lee Vance, UW Superior

In this roundtable session the presenters will share personal experiences related
to being disabled, queer, racially and gender misrepresented, transculturally
adopted, and from working class background. The facilitators will guide the
participants through a series of interactive and lively discussion questions
to explore best practices and experiences related to working with students
and colleagues who are also balancing their multiple identities. participants
will have an enhanced understanding of the complexity involved with addressing
issues that individuals balancing multiple identities face and develop connections
with others facing similar situations to begin crucial networking.

Audience: All

Diversity and Self-Identity

#9.7 Facilitating Successful Transitions into STEM Fields for Students with
Psychiatric Disabilities


Kimberly Collins, University of Illinois

Students with psychiatric disabilities are entering post-secondary education
in record numbers and large percentages are targeting fields in science, technology,
engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This presentation will focus on the results
of initial research examining the supports that are needed for students with
psychiatric disabilities to be successful in STEM fields. Focus group results,
subsequent support programs, and outcome data will be discussed. Participants
will be able to identify unique issues that STEM fields present to students
with psychiatric disabilities, understand barriers and facilitators for these
students, and learn some strategies to implement in their own settings based
on research and outcome data.

Audience: All

Transition

#9.8 College Access Project for Rural Alaska: Training Small Campuses in Universal
Design


Kaela Parks, University of Alaska Anchorage

This session highlights the College Access Project for Rural Alaska (CAPRA).
Funded through the Office of Postsecondary Education, the effort provided training
and ongoing technical assistance for smaller campuses within the University
of Alaska. Site based teams worked through challenges toward the goals of improving
instructional design as well as educational outcomes for students with disabilities.
Attendees will gain an appreciation for the challenges/limitations as well
as the successes/areas for future development, and reflect on how this UD training
may relate to efforts on their campuses.

Audience: Intermediate

Professional Competence: Stocking the DS Tool Kit

#9.9 Supporting Teacher Trainees with Learning Disabilities or ADHD in Transition
from College to Work.


Brenda Liptz, David Yellin College of Education

This presentation examines perceptions of Teacher Trainees with LD - career
choice, their unique contributions, strengths and difficulties in practice
teaching, and requests from the college. I hope it will inform faculty, supervisors,
school principals, teachers and parents, and enable all involved to help students
with LD to open up the world of equality of opportunity in career choice.

Audience: All

Transition

#9.10 Surviving Program Reviews with Confidence and Competence While Creating
DSS Opportunities.


Melanie Thompson, Southeast Missouri State University

DSS Administrators can create opportunities for their DSS offices through completion
of internal assessments and external reviews. By using critical information
received, DSS administrators can seek to address funding, staffing, and professional
development issues. Learn how one DSS Administrator addressed the critical
issues identified from an external review and a CAS assessment, and discuss
how to build upon identified opportunities. Participants will learn at least
one successful practice regarding creating opportunities for DSS programs from
critical feedback; be able to identify what type of review/assessment may be
most beneficial to them; and will be able to identify strengths and challenges
that they may encounter when undergoing program review.

Audience: Intermediate

Professional Competence: Stocking the DS Tool Kit