Presentations & Discussions

Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Opening Plenary Address: A Conversation with Judith Heumann, International Disability Rights Activist and Leader (90-minutes)

8:30-10:00 PDT
9:30-11:00 MDT
10:30-12:00 CDT
11:30-1:00 EDT 

In celebration of the 30th anniversary of passage of the ADA and recognizing the importance of history and personal narrative, AHEAD is excited to welcome Judith Heumann as our plenary speaker. To ensure that the plenary address covers reflections and insights of most interest to higher education, Judy will be interviewed by Amanda Kraus, AHEAD’s in-coming President.

Judith Heumann is an internationally recognized leader in the disability rights community and a lifelong civil rights advocate, who helped pave the way for the passage of the ADA. From serving as the World Bank's first Adviser on Disability and Development to her eight-year role as Assistant Secretary for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services in the Department of Education in the Clinton administration to the role of Special Advisor on Disability Rights for the U.S. State Department under the Obama administration, Judy has been involved in the advancement of human rights for disabled people for over 30 years. She was one of the main organizers of the 1977 HEW 504 sit-in, where nearly 150 disability rights activists demanded that President Carter implement Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act... and was even featured in Drunk History’s retelling of the story! Judy was recently featured in Crip Camp and her book Being Heumann An Unrepentant Memoir Of A Disability Rights Activist is available, as well as the audio version read by Ali Stroker.

30-minute Break 

Presentation Block 1; 3-Concurrent Options: (90-minutes)

10:30-12:00 PDT
11:30-1:00 MDT
12:30-2:00 CDT
1:30-3:00 EDT

 

1.1: The Tools, Techniques, and Strategies of Assessment in Disability Resource Offices
Ann Knettler, Delaware State University
Jill Sieben-Schneider, Northwestern University

Disability resource professionals are expected to participate actively in their institution’s assessment plans, documenting the effectiveness of their offices and, often, its impact on student learning and programming. During this unprecedented time, it may be even more important to consider our practices actively and make adjustment so that we remain effective while working under a new reality. We will introduce essential elements of a successful plan for designing and implementing a comprehensive self-assessment strategy using the Council on the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) Disability Resources and Services Standards and will focus on program and learning outcome development tools.

1.2: Explaining Extended Test Time to Concerned Faculty Members
Nicole Ofiesh, Potentia Institute 21 

There are still faculty members who resist or resent providing extended test time to students with disabilities. Using research findings, we will take a critical look at common misperceptions about extended time, including the beliefs that everyone would do better with more time, that the need for more time suggests a lack of content mastery, and that faster means better and smarter. Strategies for working with resistant faculty by unpacking their concerns, focusing on the purpose of testing, and problematizing test design will be discussed. Understanding the science of the brain and how time can ameliorate the impact of a variety of conditions will provide participants with tools for addressing faculty concerns, including those that have come about as a result of moving accommodation into the online environment. 

1.3: Discussion: Leading During and Beyond COVID-19
Adam Meyer, University of Central Florida
Enjie Hall, The University of Toledo

We’ll discuss ways to influence the changes occurring on campus, focusing primarily on work with students, faculty, and administrators and considering budget and operations management. Facilitators will prompt conversations in these areas, giving participants a chance to share strategies, questions, and experiences regarding leadership/impact on campus during this difficult time.

30-minute Break 

AHEAD Update, Business Meeting, and Awards Presentation

12:30-1:30 PDT
1:30-2:30 MDT
2:30-3:30 CDT
3:30-4:30 EDT

Join AHEAD’s President, Kristie Orr, and the Board for an update on the business of the Association. We’ll highlight the many accomplishments of the past year and review AHEAD’s financial status. We’ll then celebrate the 2020 AHEAD Award recipients who have served the Association and impacted the profession through their innovation, service, and scholarship.

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Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Featured Presentation of the Day (90-minutes)

8:30-10:00 PDT
9:30-11:00 MDT
10:30-12:00 CDT
11:30-1:00 EDT 

The NCCSD and COVID-19: Disability Services Issues from Students, Faculty and Staff

Wendy Harbour, NCCSD/AHEAD
Richard Allegra, NCCSD/AHEAD 

The National Center for College Students with Disabilities (NCCSD) has received many questions, comments, and resources about the novel coronavirus and how it is affecting students and faculty with disabilities in higher education. In this session, we’ll discuss the technical assistance requests we’ve seen and the questions coming into AHEAD’s online Communities. Participants will receive resources and ideas for navigating the summer and fall terms and will have time to raise their own concerns: what have you learned and what questions do you have?

30-minute Break 

Presentation Block 2; 3-Concurrent Options (90-minutes):

10:30-12:00 PDT
11:30-1:00 MDT
12:30-2:00 CDT
1:30-3:00 EDT

2.1: Attendance Modification: Considerations and Implementation
ElizaBeth Pifer, Northern Arizona University
Yvonne Campbell, Northern Arizona University

Requests for attendance modification as an accommodation continue to increase. OCR guidance is clear that we should not send students to negotiate complex accommodations with faculty members. Given the unique nature of each class, determining what modification, if any, is reasonable and implementing it for each student can feel overwhelming. We will discuss a framework for determining when an attendance modification may be necessary, and when other accommodations may be more appropriate. We will consider the implementation of attendance modifications for online classes or classes that need to be moved online during the COVID-19 pandemic.  

2.2: The PCC Accessibility Council: Creating Structure to Build Institutional Capacity
Kaela Parks, Portland Community College 

In 2015 Portland Community College created an Accessibility Council with defined working groups and lines of accountability as a way to build institutional capacity. This session will provide details around the structure that was put in place, with examples of how this model has promoted more inclusive business practices at scale.

2.3: Discussion: Accommodation Coordination
Rachel Kruzel, Texthelp
Carsen Kipley, University of Arizona 

As we begin to plan for students returning to the classroom this fall, with social distancing restrictions and a continuing emphasis on online learning, questions about how to be efficient and effective in coordinating accommodations abound. Engage with colleagues to explore strategies, pose questions and share ideas, including but not limited to testing, notetaking, alternative format textbooks and course materials, and assistive technology.

90-minute Break

Knowledge and Practice Community Meetings

1:30-2:30 PDT
2:30-3:30 MDT
3:30-4:30 CDT
4:30-5:30 EDT

A. REDD K&P Community Meeting
B. Technology K&P Community Meeting
C. Blind/Low Vision K&P Community Meeting

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Thursday, July 9, 2020

Featured Presentation of the Day (90-minutes)

8:30-10:00 PDT
9:30-11:00 MDT
10:30-12:00 CDT
11:30-1:00 EDT 

Research Year in Review Through a COVID-19 Lens

Sally Scott, AHEAD
Katherine Aquino, St. Johns University
Nicole Ofiesh, Potentia Institute 21
Manju Banerjee, Landmark College

It’s been a year of upheaval and change in higher education! What's happening in research related to disability access in postsecondary education, and what are the implications for our work in a COVID-19 world? National experts will discuss research that can anchor your practice, challenge your thinking, and spur creative responses to the year ahead. Time will be provided for questions and answers.

30-minute Break 

Presentation Block 3; 3-Concurrent Options (90-minutes):

10:30-12:00 PDT
11:30-1:00 MDT
12:30-2:00 CDT
1:30-3:00 EDT

3.1: A Comprehensive Look at Note-Taking Accommodations: From Coordination through Technology
Paul Harwell, Purdue University 

Note-taking is traditionally one of the most commonly requested accommodations in higher education, but, as classes move online, does it still have a place in creating access? We will discuss ways to determine whether note-taking is a necessary accommodation and how to provide student access in a variety of contexts. Research, best practices, policies and procedures, and assistive technologies will be covered.

3.2: Decisions, Decisions: Helping Students with Psychiatric Conditions Navigate Disclosure in the Academic Environment
Brittany Stone, Rutgers University
Amy Banko, Rutgers University

The decision to disclose a non-apparent disability is a personal one that can be particularly complex when it comes to a psychiatric condition. Unanticipated inquiries by professors or classmates about disability status, nature of the condition, or abilities can lead a student to disclose more information than they intend which can hinder the academic experience. We will discuss strategies to better engage students around the disclosure decision-making process and will include a structured approach to assessing personal disclosure preferences in academic and social situations that may arise in the educational environment.

3.3: Discussion: Creative Problem-Solving with Faculty
Elizabeth Harrison, University of Dayton
Tammy Berberi, University of Minnesota, Morris

Persuading faculty to partner on access, accommodations, and diversity issues can be challenging. This discussion will build upon scenarios that frame disability as a facet of diversity and identity in order to explore the realities of interaction with faculty and cultivate a more receptive and respectful campus that empowers all students.

90-minute Break

Knowledge and Practice Community Meetings

1:30-2:30 PDT
2:30-3:30 MDT
3:30-4:30 CDT
4:30-5:30 EDT

D. Community College K&P Community Meeting
E. Mental Health K&P Community Meeting
F. Disability Studies K&P Community Meeting

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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Featured Presentation of the Day (90-minutes)

8:30-10:00 PDT
9:30-11:00 MDT
10:30-12:00 CDT
11:30-1:00 EDT 

Legal Year in Review

Paul Grossman, Hastings School of Law
Jo Anne Simon, New York Assembly

What a year this has been!  As we have all pivoted to an on-line presence, exemplary court-ordered and court-approved remedial plans have been issued. Two highly significant cases on captioning have been settled. It is only logical that by July, we will begin to get the outline of post-secondary student disability law as it directly pertains to COVID-19: including EEOC employment guidance that is pertinent and analogous to the treatment of students as they return to campus and insights into whether students with COVID-19 or a record of COVID may be considered individuals with disabilities, some entitled to accommodations. COVID-19 has rekindled the historic question of whether and when it is ever ethical and legal to treat individuals with disabilities as “disposable people.” Though this is usually a question limited to scholarly debates, these days, it may affect you or someone you love as they enter the ER, unable to breath. Of course, the law marches on in other areas, including service dogs and on campus transit. 

30-minute Break 

Presentation Block 4; 3-Concurrent Options (90-minutes):

10:30-12:00 PDT
11:30-1:00 MDT
12:30-2:00 CDT
1:30-3:00 EDT

4.1: Testing PDFs for Accessibility and Standards Conformance
Paul Rayius, Florida State University

In the current climate of social distancing and remote learning due to the COVID-19 crisis, it’s now more important than ever to ensure content is accessible. While many organizations have adopted accessible learning systems, popular shared content, like PDF documents, is often inaccessible. So how do you guarantee that PDF documents are accessible? In this session, attendees will learn PDF accessibility standards and requirements. Accessibility testers who attend this virtual session will know the technical requirements for verifying PDF documents meet accessibility standards, be aware of the tools available for compliance testing and, most importantly, gain a full understanding of how to read and interpret the reports created by these programs

4.2: Building Strong Relationships in a Virtual World
Christina Fabrey, Prescott College
Jodi Sleeper-Triplett, JST Coaching and Training

As disability support providers, our relationships with students and others form the foundation of learning and growth. Our ability to connect is challenged as our institutions shift to distance learning and our communities grapple with the difficulties presented by physical distancing. It takes skills to manage communications using a virtual platform and strengthen relationships at a distance. Coaching skills are valuable in conversations with students, colleagues, direct reports, institution stakeholders and management. We’ll explore how to build strong relationships in a virtual world using coaching techniques and appreciative strategies that disability support providers can easily integrate in their interactions with students and staff to increase motivation, reframe challenges, and instill self-confidence as we navigate this “new normal.”

4.3: Discussion: Returning to Campus in the Fall
Jen Dugger, Portland State University

Many colleges and universities are planning for an incremental return to campus in the fall. In what ways and how can we contribute to the success of this next transition? While “going remote” has created many challenges, a return that includes restricted on-campus access alongside continued virtual remote learning is likely to feel pretty daunting. Join colleagues for community and collaboration in anticipating access barriers and identifying solutions in moving back to campus during the upcoming period of social distancing.

30-minute Break

Presentation Block 5; 3-Concurrent Options (60-minutes):

12:30-1:30 PDT
1:30-2:30 MDT
2:30-3:30 CDT
3:30-4:30 EDT

5.1: Collaborating with University Partners for Inclusive Engagement in the COVID Campus
Chris Stone, Washington University in St. Louis
RJ Kilgore, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Jon Kapell, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Stefanie Norris, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Our colleges and universities—faculty, staff, and disability professionals¬¬—are now charged with placing a significant emphasis on turning traditional learning environments into inclusive online colleges. Additionally, we are tasked with connecting and building affinity within the student population. As a result, we’re seeing a proliferation of online programming for campus activities and recreation centers to support student connection during this unique time. As disability resource professionals, we assist our institutions in ensuring disabled students are considered as this programming is developed. Presenters will discuss their strategies for keeping access and inclusion in the conversation from Day 1, not as an afterthought or “extra burden” that disrupts established planning. Disability Resource and Campus Life professionals will detail the rationale for proactively designing activities for engagement of all students, including those with disabilities. We’ll offer suggestions for integrating access in a broader conversation of diversity and inclusion and leveraging campus partners to further university objectives.

5.2: Considerations for Online Course Testing and Remote Proctoring after the Pandemic
Brad Held, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

With this unexpected online environment for students and the increase of digital course offerings, accommodated testing and remote proctoring should continue to offer an accessible academic experience. Accessibility Service Providers have historically played a collaborative role in ensuring faculty provide access and accommodations in the physical exam settings. Why does this partnership need to be different when everyone is working from home? We will tackle some of the challenges that technology creates in online testing and important considerations for remote proctoring. Learn innovative ideas to encourage student independence while addressing any new barriers.


5.3: 
Student-to-Staff Ratios: Caseload Benchmarking and Budget Advocacy for Disability Services
Kirsten Brown, Edgewood College
Autumn Wilke, Grinnell College
Maria Pena, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Student-to-staff ratio (caseload) is a metric used to justify budgetary requests. In this session, we present caseload data for disability professionals using a random, national sample. We disaggregate this data by institution type, enrollment size, reporting structure, office size, and AHEAD membership. Then, we discuss, from a social justice perspective, why caseload can be problematic as a metric of practitioner workload. Finally, disability leaders from public research and private liberal arts institutions describe seven budgetary strategies they employ to use caseload metrics, in combination with other data-driven tools, to advocate for socially just staffing practices.

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Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Featured Presentation of the Day (90-minutes)

8:30-10:00 PDT
9:30-11:00 MDT
10:30-12:00 CDT
11:30-1:00 EDT 

Everyday Ableism - Exploring Disability Bias and Microaggressions

Amanda Kraus, University of Arizona

When we understand disability in a context of social justice and ableism, a cultural experience shaped by dynamics of power and privilege, we can begin to unpack the many ways disabled people are targets of bias and microaggressions. Emerging research on bias challenges us to appreciate bias as unintentional or even well-intended, behaviors and attitudes. As disability services professionals, it is important to have awareness of disability bias and the many ways bias manifests in higher education. This workshop will include discussion of research on bias and microagressions and relate it to practice.

30-minute Break 

Presentation Block 6; 3-Concurrent Options (90-minutes):

10:30-12:00 PDT
11:30-1:00 MDT
12:30-2:00 CDT
1:30-3:00 EDT

6.1:Essential Assistive Technology Tools to Add to Your Toolbox
Rachel Kruzel, Texthelp

The field of assistive technology is constantly changing and using AT tools in solving accessibility problems is a best practice for disability resource work. The constant change could not be more evident than during the recent and rapid move to online education. As we’ve seen, knowing common and cutting edge assistive technology options is essential. This presentation will include demonstration and discussion of common tools, free and low-cost options, and tools to watch as they begin to enter our market. Attendees will leave with countless tools to fill their AT Toolbox and to immediately implement with students in both in-person and online classes on their campuses.

6.2: Service & Assistance Animals in a Changing Landscape
L. Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

A discussion of the social and legal landscape for service and assistance animals on campus will map the critical contours of a comprehensive campus policy. Short scenarios will highlight new issues related to COVID-19 (animal exposure, impact on requests for ESAs) documentation; progression from pet to ESA to service animal; exotic animals; balancing conflicts (allergies, fear, religious objections); behavior issues; and animals in different campus environments (residence, classroom, labs, etc.).


6.3: Discussion: Critical Questions for Clinical Programs
Lisa Meeks
Jan Serrantino

In this new discussion format we are creating new rules. Using the chat box, attendees can submit their questions about accommodating students in clinical programs. The hosts will cover such topics as technical standards, clinical accommodations, assistive technology, leave of absence procedures and direct the attendees to resources.

90-minute Break

Knowledge and Practice Community Meetings

1:30-2:30 PDT
2:30-3:30 MDT
3:30-4:30 CDT
4:30-5:30 EDT

G. LD/ADHD K&P Community Meeting
H. LGBTQA K&P Community Meeting
I. Autism K&P Community Meeting

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Thursday, July 16, 2020

Featured Presentation of the Day (90-minutes)

8:30-10:00 PDT
9:30-11:00 MDT
10:30-12:00 CDT
11:30-1:00 EDT 

Accessibility After the Pandemic: What Happens Now?

Kelly Hermann, University of Phoenix
Daja McCleve, University of Phoenix
Robert Becker, University of Phoenix

Issues with the accessibility of educational technology may have come to light for the first time as institutions shifted to virtual and online course offerings in response to COVID-19. This may be especially true for campuses that have not adopted an accessibility policy and have had very little experience with online means of educating students. So, where do we go from here? How do small, one or two person offices with little technical expertise regarding accessibility ensure that their course offerings are accessible for students? We will share the steps we have taken at the University of Phoenix to move the needle on accessibility throughout the University from procurement to course development to working with faculty to accommodating students that can be used at any institution.

30-minute Break 

Presentation Block 7; 3-Concurrent Options (90-minutes):

10:30-12:00 PDT
11:30-1:00 MDT
12:30-2:00 CDT
1:30-3:00 EDT

7.1: Identifying and Removing Barriers to Access: Using a Framework to Guide Considerations of Complex Requests
Adam Meyer, University of Central Florida
Jamie Axelrod, Northern Arizona University

When more complex requests, such as extended time for deadlines or new access considerations in light of COVID-19, are presented to us, it can be difficult to know how to assess the reasonableness of the request. Much time can be spent analyzing how to proceed. In the end, how do we know if the accommodation will address and remove the barrier? In this session, we explore thoughts to these questions and share a framework for how to consider these challenging requests. Examples to be considered in the proposed framework include deadline extensions and a COVID-19-related situation. While the framework is not meant to be a checklist, using a structured approach can increase confidence in decisions made.

7.2: Tips for Promoting Accessible IT Campus-wide Within the Context of a Universal Design Framework
Sheryl Burgstahler, University of Washington

Universal design (UD) has emerged as a paradigm to address diversity, equity, and inclusion in the design of a broad range of applications that include technology, physical spaces, instruction, and student services. Applying UD to information technology is particularly important because of its important role as colleges and universities support more offerings using Internet tools. Engage with the speaker and other participants in discussion of how promoting the UD paradigm in all aspects of campus life can influence the expectation that technology procured, developed, and used on campus will be accessible.

7.3: Discussion: Single Staff Disability Resource Offices
Allison Fuller, Maryville University
Mike Ritter, Missouri Western State University

As a department of one and the only person on campus designated to provide accommodations and focus on ensuring accessible campus experiences for students with disabilities, you may feel overwhelmed most of the time. How can you manage your time to accomplish your goals? What partnerships are imperative to student access, especially in this time of social distancing and remote learning? How can you creatively get the support you need? This conversation offers the opportunity to learn how other "departments of one" creatively navigate the role and to share strategies, challenges, and successes.

90-minute Break

1:30-2:30 PDT
2:30-3:30 MDT
3:30-4:30 CDT
4:30-5:30 EDT

Society for Disability Studies: Town Hall Business Meeting

Joanne Woiak, University of Washington; Society for Disability Studies
Suzanne Stoltz, University of California, San Diego

The Society for Disability Studies started in 1982 and now has 500 members and an additional 500 regular contacts. SDS co-conferences at Ohio State University in April, and with several other groups throughout the year. Come meet the Society for Disability Studies President and Directors and find out about the Society and our new programs. Help us be increasingly relevant to your work.

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Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Featured Presentation of the Day (90-minutes)

8:30-10:00 PDT
9:30-11:00 MDT
10:30-12:00 CDT
11:30-1:00 EDT 

OCR Year in Review - This presentation will NOT be available as a recording; to participate, you must join the presentation live

Mary Lou, Mobley, U.S. Office for Civil Rights, Department of Education
Ava DeAlmeida-Law, Office for Civil Rights, Department of Education
Annie Lee, Office for Civil Rights, Department of Education

The Office for Civil Rights assists individuals with disabilities who face discrimination and guides institutions in developing solutions to civil rights problems by investigating complaints, initiating compliance reviews, and providing technical assistance. OCR representatives will review recent, illustrative OCR decisions.

30-minute Break 

Presentation Block 8; 3-Concurrent Options (90-minutes):

10:30-12:00 PDT
11:30-1:00 MDT
12:30-2:00 CDT
1:30-3:00 EDT

8.1: Supporting Students with Autism Through COVID-19 Required Transitions
Jane Thierfeld Brown, Yale Child Study, Yale Medical School
Lorraine Wolf, Boston University

The changes of the past semester have been difficult for everyone but, for students on the spectrum who were adjusted to daily life on the college campus, the transition to an at-home and online environment may be even more disruptive. We’ll discuss what is required under ADA, how to deliver social accommodations online and useful interventions. Participants will acquire skills to assist students on the spectrum in these unprecedented times.

8.2: How do I Pin the Interpreter? Can we Use Automatic Captions Instead? FAQ’s for Online Accessibility and Deaf Students
Lauren Kinast, National Deaf Center
Stephanie Zito, National Deaf Center

The National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes (NDC) has been fielding questions about providing communication access services for deaf students in online learning environments. Challenges include how to assimilate service providers (i.e., interpreters and speech-to-text professionals) into online platforms, accommodation changes for online classes vs. in-person classes, faculty awareness, and more. We will address commonly asked questions and offer innovative strategies on how to ensure effective communication is possible in online education. Participants will leave with NDC resources designed to support them in working with a variety of deaf students and their communication needs. Join us for this interactive session, and let’s work together to enhance online accessibility for deaf students.

8.3: Discussion: Legal Q&A
Paul Grossman, Hastings College of Law
Jamie Axelrod, Northern Arizona University 

An important part of every AHEAD conference is the opportunity to ask questions of the legal experts. In our virtual format, we don’t want to lose this essential conversation. Log into the meeting to pose your questions and hear more about recent issues that impact higher education and disability.

30-minute Break

Presentation Block 9; 3-Concurrent Options (60-minutes)

12:30-1:30 PDT
1:30-2:30 MDT
2:30-3:30 CDT
3:30-4:30 EDT

9.1: Beyond Accommodations: Collaborating with Teaching and Learning Centers to Create Accessible and Inclusive Learning Environments for All Students Before, During, and After COVID-19 
Emily Shryock, University of Texas at Austin
Adria Battaglia, Peloton University

The sudden change in the higher education landscape brought about by COVID-19 has only served to highlight the need for creative approaches and intentional design to engage and educate diverse students in virtual learning environments. Disability service (DS) offices and teaching and learning centers (TLCs) are uniquely situated to lead this shift by working with instructors and campus administrators to adopt a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework across campus. We will share examples of a UDL collaboration between DS and TLC before and during COVID-19 that have had, and hopefully will continue to have, a positive impact on accessible and inclusive learning environments for all students. Participants will be invited to think along with us about the opportunities for creating sustainable strategies that build on the conversations and momentum COVID-19 has brought to our campuses. 

9.2: Nice to (Virtually) Meet You: New Student Interviews in the Age of Social Distancing
Jon McGough, Western Washington University 
Brad Elmendorf, University of Washington

Going into the next academic year, the opportunity to meet face-to-face with new students seeking accommodations will be limited or non-existent. The interactive process we use to understand a student’s requests for accommodation and previous academic experiences will look different, from the way we engage to the questions we ask to the relationships we work to establish. We’ll consider strategies for creating a remote interview plan that provides the information necessary for making decisions and conveys your commitment to supporting student access.

9.3: Student with Anxiety and Disability
Jo Anne Simon, New York Assembly

A growing number of disability resource offices report that most of their new requests for accommodations come from students with anxiety-related conditions, and this is only amplified by the sudden shift to online learning. However, these students are often not approved for accommodations or recognized as “disabled” because they have no documentation or established history of clinical anxiety. Since the primary age of onset of mental health conditions is between the ages of 17 to 25, students may arrive on our campuses without a formal history or first begin to develop symptoms while studying at our institutions. When do students with mental health conditions become protected by the ADA and eligible for accommodations, and what information is needed to establish a need?

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Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Featured Presentation of the Day (90-minutes)

8:30-10:00 PDT
9:30-11:00 MDT
10:30-12:00 CDT
11:30-1:00 EDT 

Leading During and Beyond COVID-19

Adam Meyer, University of Central Florida
Enjie Hall, The University of Toledo

COVID-19 has led to sudden changes in the short-term and many uncertainties heading into the long-term. Leading and influencing the dialogue around disability and inclusion during this time can be challenging. We will explore some of the main leadership themes that are emerging in this unprecedented time and discuss ways to apply them in our work. Since we are all leaders who can influence others and impact situations, the concepts are applicable to everyone, regardless of position title. The session will balance information sharing with virtual small group discussion.

30-minute Break 

Presentation Block 10; 3-Concurrent Options (90-minutes):

10:30-12:00 PDT
11:30-1:00 MDT
12:30-2:00 CDT
1:30-3:00 EDT

10.1: Not 100% Accessible? Develop an Alternate Access Plan Ahead of Time
Nicolás Crisosto, College of the Desert
Sean Keegan, California Community College Accessibility Center

Wouldn't we like to believe technology can be made 100% accessible? But there will usually still be a need for accommodations. This does not have to be a barrier for institutions to meet Section 508 accessibility goals and obligations. Instead, each time an institution reviews an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) product, it can be part of a collective effort to reduce the accessibility barriers for students, faculty, and staff, anywhere the product is used. In this session, participants will learn how a product's Voluntary Product Accessibility Template (VPAT) can help an institution develop an Equally Effective Alternate Access Plan (EEAAP) and ensure the institution is taking steps towards achieving Section 508 compliance.

10.2: Student Affairs Administrators: A Resource for Amplifying the Need for Systemic Change
Elisa Laird, Samuel Merritt University
Craig Elliott, Samuel Merritt University

In a recent survey, many student affairs administrators reported a need to know more about disability and access, especially those who directly supervise disability offices. The institutional changes necessitated by COVID-19 only serve to highlight the importance of this relationship. We will consider how senior leaders can empower and enable disability office personnel to shift from addressing accommodation needs on an individual basis to making more systemic change. We will model conversations and role play how to carry out conversations between disability offices and student affairs to effectively move forward institutional change efforts to positively impact campus access and the learning environment.

10.3: Including Students with Mental Health Conditions
Michelle Mullen, University of Massachusetts Boston

The intention of this session is to promote discussion about the challenges college students with mental health conditions experience on campus, especially in light of the changes necessitated by COVID-19. The focus of our discussion will be the implications of common campus conditions and how services can conceptualize skill building, accommodations, and assistive technology to reduce academic disruptions and increase academic persistence.

90-minute Break

Knowledge and Practice Community Meetings

1:30-2:30 PDT
2:30-3:30 MDT
3:30-4:30 CDT
4:30-5:30 EDT

J. Animals K&P Community Meeting
K. Vets K&P Community Meeting
L. Deaf/Hard of Hearing K&P Community Meeting

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Thursday, July 23, 2020

Featured Presentation of the Day (90-minutes)

8:30-10:00 PDT
9:30-11:00 MDT
10:30-12:00 CDT
11:30-1:00 EDT 

Individualization, The Interactive Process and Fundamental Alteration

Jamie Axelrod, Northern Arizona University
Paul Grossman, Hastings College of Law

In this session, we will look at three key issues that commonly arise in OCR letters and court cases: individualization, the interactive process, and fundamental alteration determination. It turns out that focusing your office practices on these important concepts will help you make more informed and helpful decisions when working with students and faculty.

30-minute Break 

Presentation Block 11; 3-Concurrent Options (90-minutes):

10:30-12:00 PDT
11:30-1:00 MDT
12:30-2:00 CDT
1:30-3:00 EDT

11.1: A Partnership: Disability Support and Housing
Lindsay Northup-Moore, American University
Nicole Nowinski, American University
Christopher Silva, American University
Schuyler Asman, American University

Disability Support and Housing offices should have a natural partnership; however, the relationship is not always as collegial and collaborative as it could be. We will discuss strategies for building a partnership between housing professionals and disability professionals that enhances the student experience. Considering the impact the pandemic and social distancing will have on our work in the fall, we will share our holistic approach and discuss upcoming housing needs that both offices should consider proactively.

11.2: Accessible Online Courses: How to Strategize, Prioritize, and Educate
Christine Scherer, Northwestern University

With millions of students and hundreds of thousands of classes suddenly moving online in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, web accessibility has become a critical issue for institutions around the world. In this presentation, we’ll go over some key strategies for ensuring that online classes are accessible, from headings to captions to technology access. We’ll also talk about how to prioritize your efforts and how to educate faculty and staff on web accessibility best practices.

11.3: Discussion: Disability, Diversity and Inclusion
Melanie Thornton, University of Arkansas - Partners for Inclusive Communities
Elizabeth (liz) Thompson, University of Minnesota - Morris


In this interactive session, we'll pose questions, including: How do we position disability as an aspect of diversity on our campuses? Are our offices effectively reaching disabled students with intersectional identities? Who are the partners in the work? What kinds of programming are effective in promoting disability as diversity? What are disability cultural centers and what role can they plan in this work?

90-minute Break

Knowledge and Practice Community Meetings

1:30-2:30 PDT
2:30-3:30 MDT
3:30-4:30 CDT
4:30-5:30 EDT

M. Online/Distance Education K&P Meeting
N. ADA Coordinators K&P Meeting

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