Preconference Institutes

The 2012 Preconference Institutes provide opportunities for attendees to participate in intensive, topic-specific, workshop-style events taught by notable and well-respected experts in their field. Ranging from 3 1/2 hours to two full days, the Institutes are an outstanding chance for Conference attendees to receive in-depth professional development.

Preconference Institutes do require advance registration by June 29, 2012 and an additional tuition fee (separate from the Conference registration fee). On-site registration for Preconference Institutes is not available. Registration for Preconference Institutes includes all instruction materials and refreshment breaks. Meals, housing and travel are not included unless noted. Please see the registration form for applicable tuition charges.

Two-Day Preconference Institutes

Half-Day Preconference Institutes - Morning

Monday July 9, 2012 9:00 am - 12:30 pm

Half-Day Preconference Institutes - Afternoon

Monday July 9, 2012 2:00 pm-5:30 pm

One-Day Preconference Institutes

Tuesday July 10, 2012 9:00 am-5:30 pm

Half-Day Preconference Institutes - Morning

Tuesday July 10, 2012 9:00 am-12:30 pm

Half-Day Preconference Institutes - Afternoon

Tuesday July 12, 2012 2:00 pm-5:30 pm

Two-Day Preconference Institutes

Monday July 9, AND Tuesday July 10, 2012

9:00 am-5:30 pm each day

#PC1 Introduction to Disability Law for DS Professionals

L. Scott Lissner, The Ohio State University

Paul Grossman, Hastings College of the Law

This presentation will give DS professionals a comprehensive introduction to postsecondary disability law and establish a framework for answering the questions they encounter on a daily basis. What accommodations are, or are not, required in the college and university setting? What must be done to make facilities and programs accessible to persons with disabilities? This institute will begin with a review of the history of discrimination against individuals with disabilities and the emergence of the disability rights movement culminating in the adoption of disability laws. We will learn what legal traditions and concepts all antidiscrimination laws share and then what is unique to disability law. We will provide an exploration of the practical implications of the new definition of disability and new regulations covering documentation, service animals, housing, ticketing and more. Topics unique to higher education, such as admissions, discipline, academic accommodations, internships, residence halls service animals on campus, and others will be covered. We will cover procedures to ensure compliance, common pitfalls to avoid, handling internal complaints of discrimination, cooperation and noncooperation by faculty, the scope of the duty to provide accessible websites, alternative media, and assistive technology.

Audience: All

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#PC2 Learning Disabilities & Psychoeducational Assessment: From Theory, to Understanding, to Practice

Rhonda H. Rapp, University of St. Mary, Texas

It is a well-known fact that students with learning disabilities are one of the largest populations of students with disabilities on college campuses today. Many colleges and universities seek recent, comprehensive psychoeducational evaluations of students with learning disabilities in order to best shape the students’ academic accommodations. However, many postsecondary disability services professionals come to their positions with little or no up-to-date or formal training in the complexities of learning disabilities and the administration and/or interpretation of psychoeducational evaluations; even though they are required to request assessment documentation and review it in order to assess the most appropriate academic accommodations for students. The goal of this institute is to provide a thorough and in-depth understanding of learning processes and learning disabilities, and to make psychoeducational reports accessible and meaningful to professionals working with postsecondary students with learning disabilities. This Institute will explore strategies for the assessment of learning disabilities from a psychoeducational perspective. The focus will be on students in all types of postsecondary education settings. Topics will include learning processes, characteristics of learning disability subtypes, evaluation methods, and accommodation strategies directly linked to psychoeducational test results. This institute will be highly interactive and hands-on; learning disability case studies/documentation (solicited from institute attendees) will be used as the starting point for this institute and will be utilized throughout the two-day institute.

Audience: Novice to Intermediate

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Half-Day Preconference Institutes - Morning

Monday July 9, 2012 9:00 am - 12:30 pm

#PC3 Executive Function: What it is; What it Does and How to Improve it!

Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut School of Law

Lorraine Wolf, Boston University

Knowing who we are and understanding why we do what we do are the hallmarks of being an adult. These skills mature during the adolescence and young adulthood, thus most students graduate college as fully fledged adult who possess many of the essential skills to take them to careers and adult life. Moving students along the developmental continuum is part of our mission in disability services but curiously, these attributes seem to be differently developed in students with disabilities, especially those individuals on the autism spectrum. This session will use cutting edge theories of brain and cognitive development to understand the interplay between executive functioning and theory of mind. Participants will learn to foster development of self- regulatory skills in college students, including those on the spectrum

Audience: All

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#PC4 Accessibility Through Captioning

Cindy Camp, PN2 – Jacksonville State University

Michelle Swaney, PN2 – University of Tennessee at Knoxville

With recent legal decisions concerning accessibility, the topic of captioning has been brought into the spotlight. Captioning, media shown in the classroom and digital media posted online, is no longer an option but a legal mandate. This workshop will talk about the process of captioning media, various software options, and the importance of quality captioning. Bring your questions and be ready to learn.

Audience: All

PEPNet 2.0

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Half-Day Preconference Institutes - Afternoon

Monday July 9, 2012 2:00 pm-5:30 pm

#PC5 Supporting the Educational Experience of Students on the Autism Spectrum through Online and Video Conferencing

Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut School of Law

Video conferencing is a tool for teaching and supporting students on the autism spectrum. Free programs available on the internet facilitate idea exchanges and conversations across geographical areas. The presenters use Skype and online role-playing modules to monitor academic issues and provide social supports for college students with ASD. The presenters will demonstrate webcam technology through video of student interactions.

Audience: All

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#PC6 Working with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students: Introduction and Emerging Trends

Ruth Loew, Educational Testing Service

Daniel “Dann” Trainer, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Emily Paul, University of Minnesota

Bambi Riehl, PN2 - University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

This pre-conference institute will cover three main topics: an overview of key issues in working with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, including an introduction to Deaf culture; recent trends in assistive technologies that enable students to access classroom as well as co-curricular activities; and current strategies for determining appropriate accommodations for this population in the postsecondary environment.

Audience: All

PEPNet 2.0

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One-Day Preconference Institutes

Tuesday July 10, 2012 9:00 am-5:30 pm

#PC7 Access Technologies: An A to Z Introduction

Ron Stewart, AHEAD and California Community Colleges

Teresa Haven, Arizona State University

This hands on preconference will introduce participants to an overview of technologies that are typically used in providing access to classroom and other learning environments, course materials, research settings, and technology tools used on postsecondary campuses. Both commercial and non-commercial technologies will be explored at an introductory level. The focus of the session will be on choosing technologies based on the learning task at hand and usability across the curriculum. The target audience is intended to be participants that need an introductory overview of the types of AT and the typical target audience that are the intended end users of these technologies.

Audience: Novice to Intermediate

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#PC8 OUT OF THE BOX! Setting the Landscape for the New Professional

Sue Kroeger, University of Arizona

Amanda Kraus, University of Arizona

We cannot deny the changing landscape of disability in contemporary society. Scholars and activists are engaged in reframing traditional perspectives of disability, and their good work challenges us to rethink our personal and professional concepts of disability and our roles on campus and to design service delivery practices accordingly. Designed specifically for the new professional, this concurrent session will give you the tools necessary to unpack, dismantle, and analyze the philosophical constructs and legal foundations that guide our work today and revolutionize our work tomorrow. Through dialogue, activities, and media analysis, we will grapple with topics that will profoundly impact our professional identities and practices. Participants will:

  • Reflect on professional goals and roles
  • Explore legal and philosophical foundations
  • Examine society’s frame of disability and its influence on professional practice
  • Reflect on the power of design, media, and language in shaping the disability experience
  • Explore disability activism, art, and studies and why they matter
  • Identify actions that will profoundly impact practice

Audience: Novice

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#PC9 OUT OF THE BOX! Refocusing for the Continuing Professional

Margaret Camp, University of South Carolina Upstate

Susan Lausier, Aurora University

Adam Meyer, Eastern Michigan University

Katheryne Staeger-Wilson, , Missouri State University

Kimberly Tanner, Valdosta State University

Melanie Thompson, Northern Illinois University

Randall Ward, Lake Michigan College

The 2012 AHEAD conference theme, DESIGN: Diversity, Equity, Social Change, Influence, Global, New Orleans, fits well with AHEAD’s philosophy of viewing disability as the interaction between person and environment while creating equitable, sustainable and usable postsecondary environments that create inclusive communities. But what does this mean for our work as disability service professionals? How might our procedures, language and encounters with students and faculty either work toward these values or against them? Where do disability studies and social justice, two emerging themes in this year’s conference, fit into all of this? This thought-provoking, interactive preconference session will explore the basics of social justice, the social model of disability and disability studies. How can and should these concepts influence our day-to-day work (syllabus statement, initial interviews, office procedures, etc.) and emerge as best practices? Talking points and hands-on work include:

Foundations:

  • Models of disability
  • Social welfare vs. social justice
  • Overview of disability studies
  • Personal core values and the values of our field currently
  • Power and influence of language

Action Planning-- Considerations and Discussion:

  • Office mission statements
  • Syllabus statements
  • Student initial interview
  • Accommodation letters
  • Office job descriptions
  • Continuing this journey in the future

Audience: Intermediate to Advanced

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#PC10 The Dysregulated Freshman: Assessing, Remediating and Accommodating Deficits in Executive Functioning

Lorraine Wolf, Boston University

Jane Thierfeld Brown, University of Connecticut School of Law

Students with deficits in executive functioning and self-regulation will struggle in a setting which demands organization and flexibility. A variety of disabilities, hidden and not hidden, affect the underlying brain systems. Many neurodevelopmental and acquired disorders have been linked to EF include mood disorders, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, learning disabilities, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders and personality disorders. Indeed, the greater case load of the DS professional may be comprised of students who are dysregulated, regardless of the specifics of their condition. Struggling freshman may be caught between environmental demands, brain development, and features of their disability. Through the presentation of research data and case discussion, participants will learn to identify the dysregulated freshman. A focus on simple cognitive strategies designed for DS practitioners will help attendees learn to support students’ success.

Audience: All

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#PC11 DOJ’s 2010 Accessibility Standards – Did You Meet the March 2012 “Deadline” and Are You Past the Starting Line?

Irene Bowen, ADA One, LLC

James Bostrom, US Department of Justice

The first new accessibility standards under the Americans with Disabilities Act since 1991 are now in effect. Explore the key changes that affect higher education, including a new approach to housing on campus. Find out what the March 2012 “compliance date” for existing facilities means to your campus, especially as to recreation facilities and assembly areas. And learn ways to ensure that your facilities comply with the new standards that went into effect in March too. You’ll find out how to find key terms and requirements, examine some real-life examples of what works and what might work, when you take your knowledge back to campus. Join a DOJ deputy chief who is an Architect, and a former DOJ official as they cover key changes that will affect your campus’s existing, new, and altered facilities.

Audience: All

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#PC12 An Interactive Introduction to Faculty Development: “Re-Designing” Our Work in Disability Services

Elizabeth Harrison, University of Dayton

This interactive preconference workshop will (1) introduce participants to faculty development; (2) explore ways to insert inclusive design into faculty development work so that faculty developers, instructional designers, and ultimately faculty will embrace it; and (3) provide opportunities for participants to practice talking about accessibility in faculty development terms. The presenter has extensive experience in faculty development and universal design.

Audience: All

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#PC13 Unveiling the Missing Linguistic Link

Caryl Williams, New Mexico Mentoring

Sara Ware, New Mexico School for the Deaf

Are interpreters unknowingly omitting the missing linguistic link? During this interactive workshop we will step back and analyze language from our student’s perspective. Understand the missing linguistic link that is masked within sign language and learn to uncover the necessary English. Watch your students succeed as they are empowered from language rather than feeling “lost”. Attendees: Interpreters, teachers, students, advisors.

Audience: Intermediate to Advanced

PEPNet 2.0

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Half-Day Preconference Institutes - Morning

Tuesday July 10, 2012 9:00 am-12:30 pm

#PC14 Creating the Future- Using Strategic Planning to Manage Change in Disability Services

Emily Lucio, Catholic University of America

Karen Pettus, University of South Carolina

Tom Thompson, Emeritus, Wm. Rainey Harper College

Passage of the ADAAA places new demands on DS providers and produces changes in policies and procedures. The amendments broadened the definition of disability and caused us to rethink accommodations for students. The challenge for DS providers is to emerge from these changing times with a clearer vision of our mission and purpose, assessment practices, and budgeting of resources. During this preconference workshop, presenters will use handouts, worksheets, and case studies to assist providers in evaluating their strategic plan and developing a mission statement, values statement and goals that are consistent with the new federal guidelines and assist DS providers to serve as change agents on their campuses.

Audience: Intermediate to Advanced

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#PC15 Web and Information Technology Accessibility: From the Basics to Institutional Policy

Terrill Thompson, University of Washington, DOIT

Sheryl Burgstahler, University of Washington, DOIT

Lyla Crawford, University of Washington, DOIT

How can we influence campuses to be proactive about ensuring IT resources are accessible? This session will provide a basic overview of web and IT accessibility, and help participants build a foundation of knowledge that will help them advocate for institutional change. With this foundation, we will explore strategies for reducing IT barriers through development and implementation of institutional policy.

Audience: All

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#PC16 First Year Connections: Holistic Student Support Programming for Students with Disabilities

Cruz Cullari, Staten Island College CUNY

Sara Paul, Staten Island College CUNY

The First Year Connections Program, which aims to retain first year students, is a robust transition program. The Program includes important elements of outreach and support focusing primarily on the first year of college, and also includes a First Year Connections Summer Institute, which prepares students for the first year transition before college begins.

Presenters will provide valuable information about how the Program aids in the transition to college. Participants will learn about the Program’s functions throughout the academic year as well as details of how workshops are run in the Summer Institute. Presenters will work with participants to conceptualize, design and coordinate transition programs for students with disabilities in higher education.

Audience: All

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Half-Day Preconference Institutes - Afternoon

Tuesday July 12, 2012 2:00 pm-5:30 pm

#PC17 Thinking Beyond Surveys: Designing an Assessment Plan that Works for You

Kristie Orr, Texas A&M University

Paul Harwell, Texas A&M University

Throughout higher education, more emphasis is being placed on measuring the effectiveness of the services provided. Without a background in assessment, it is often hard to know where to start in planning for assessment. This presentation will focus on explaining the components of an effective assessment plan. Many methods of assessment will be discussed, as well as examples from the presenters’ assessment plan (and hopefully some of the attendees as well). Topics to be discussed in this session include: 1) Development of goals that support the mission statement 2) Development of learning outcomes and program outcomes 3) Authentic methods of assessment 4) Using university resources for support. The majority of the session will be spent in an interactive discussion with participants concerning multiple methods of assessment beyond pencil and paper (or web based) satisfaction surveys and how to meet requirements for developing and maintaining an assessment plan for their office. The presenters have worked over the last several years in developing an assessment plan for the office. They have experience with many different iterations of the plan and understand what has worked well and not so well and are eager to share their experiences and the assessments that they have used over the years.

Audience: All

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#PC18 Universal Design & Online Learning: What Does the DS Provider Need to Know?

Jane Jarrow, DAIS/DCCOL

Kelly Hermann, Empire State College SUNY

From hybrid classes (those that have a traditional, seated component along with required online activities) to hybrid students (those who are taking some of their coursework through traditional classes and some online), to those students who are enrolled solely in online classes (and whom you may never meet!), higher education is embracing the potential that the internet brings to learning opportunities. Now is the time for disability services professionals to acknowledge that new delivery methods for education create new challenges to our assigned role in assuring access for students with disabilities. Workshop participants will: understand the benefits and challenges to online course participation by students with disabilities; articulate how the seven principles of universal design may be applied to online course environments to maximize accessibility prior to the application of accommodations; and utilize resources to determine how best to meet the needs of students with disabilities in online courses through the use of case study examples.

Audience: All

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#PC19 A Systems Approach to Evacuation and Safety Procedures for Persons with Disabilities

Carol DeSouza, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Jeffrey Hescock, Emergency Planning and Business Continuity Manager, University of Massachusetts System Office

Anne Marie McLaughlin, Emergency Management and Business Continuity, University of Massachusetts Boston

Most college campuses have accepted the realities and challenges of evacuation of persons with disabilities and have written policies and procedures. The presenters’ experience may serve as an example of a systems approach and could be a model for large universities as well as smaller institutions with multiple campuses.The presenters will share their efforts in relation to compliance with the applicable regulations, understanding available technologies, and employing best practices.

Audience: All